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Latest Extinction Stories

2012-08-13 11:06:29

Rate of loss of species exceeds that of terrestrial animals North American freshwater fishes are going extinct at an alarming rate compared with other species, according to an article in the September issue of BioScience. The rate of extinctions increased noticeably after 1950, although it has leveled off in the past decade. The number of extinct species has grown by 25 percent since 1989. The article, by Noel M. Burkhead of the US Geological Survey, examines North American freshwater...

Birds In New Zealand Face Extinction
2012-08-05 19:50:05

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Keys to survival today differ from those of the past. This is revealed in a new study of nearly 300 species of New Zealand birds – from pre-human times to the present. Lead author Lindell Bromham of Australian National University said, "Taking into consideration the growing number of studies that try to predict which species could be lost in the future based on what kinds of species are considered most threatened today the...

Past Influences On Biodiversity In Madagascar
2012-07-25 10:35:30

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online While human activity is usually identified as the primary threat to biodiversity through the loss of species, a new study published in the journal Proceedings of the Natural Academy of Sciences (PNAS) focused on identifying pre-human causes of pressures that threaten endangered species. The latest research focused on Madagascar, which is world-renowned for its biodiversity and has been plagued by deforestation and the destruction of...

2012-07-19 13:46:06

Researchers address great uncertainties in number of species and emphasize the use of technology to accelerate the rate of species discovery Most of the world's species are still unknown to science although many researchers grappled to address the question of how many species there are on Earth over the recent decades. Estimates of non-microbial diversity on Earth provided by researchers range from 2 million to over 50 million species, with great uncertainties in numbers of insects, fungi,...

Frog Diseases Increasing
2012-07-19 10:38:29

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In addition to the stresses placed on amphibians, or perhaps because of them, they are now more likely to succumb to debilitating infectious diseases. In recent decades, disease seems to have taken a more prominent role in the amphibian mortality rate, according to a new study published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B. Along with climate change, habitat destruction, pollution and invasive species, these creatures...

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2012-07-13 11:29:25

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The clearing of the Brazilian rainforest is racking up a debt than won´t be paid by any government, but instead will be paid by the species that become extinct as a result of the destruction of their habitat. If deforestation and development in the Brazilian Amazon occur at their current rates over the next 40 years, 25 vertebrate species will become locally extinct, according to new research published this week in Science....

Species Interactions Could Be Affected By Global Warming
2012-06-23 09:06:42

Yale and University of Connecticut researchers report that more extinctions will take place due to global warming should "scientists fail to account for interactions among species in their models." According to Phoebe Zarnetske, primary author and postdoctoral fellow at Yale´s School of forestry & Environmental Studies department, “Currently, most models predicting the effects of climate change treat species separately and focus only on climatic and environmental drivers."...

Mass Extinction Of Species Could Prove Harmful To Humans
2012-06-20 11:29:42

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com Plants and animals, both wild and domestic, are inextricably linked and any mass extinction of species would be catastrophic for life around the world, including humans. That´s the underlying theme in the newest update to the Red List of Threatened Species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) released Tuesday at the Rio+20 conference. The report showed that “of the 63,837 species assessed, 19,817 are threatened with...

Climate Change Linked To Woolly Mammoth Decline
2012-06-14 08:29:59

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com New evidence points to a dual conspiracy of climate change factors and hunting activities by early man that to drove the woolly mammoth to extinction between 4,000 and 10,000 years ago. The gradual decline of the sub-Arctic giant was likely caused in part by global warming induced changes in habitat, according to a new report published by an American-led research team in Nature Communications this week. These changes included a decline in the mammoths' food...


Latest Extinction Reference Libraries

Waitoreke
2014-02-05 16:37:44

The Waitoreke is a cryptid from New Zealand described as being otter-like. Its name derived from “Wai” is a Maori word for water. The rest of the word has different translations, but the common one is “toreke,” which means to disappear. Together the name could translate into “disappears into water” or another translation is a “disappearing water specter.” The usual description is a small otter-like creature about the size of a cat. It has brownish short fur and short...

Red Rail, Aphanapteryx bonasia
2013-10-02 13:35:50

The Red Rail (Aphanapteryx bonasia) is an extinct and flightless rail. It was native to the Mascarene island of Mauritius, east of Madagascar within the Indian Ocean. It had a close relative on Rodrigues Island, the likewise extinct Rodrigues Rail, with which it’s sometimes considered congeneric. Its relationship with other rail isn’t clear. Rails frequently evolve flightlessness when adapting to isolated islands. It was slightly larger than a chicken and had reddish and hair-like...

Panthera leo spelaea
2012-11-16 15:34:04

Commonly known as the Eurasian cave lion or the European cave lion, Panthera leo spelaea is an extinct subspecies of lion. It is thought to have lived during the Pleistocene epoch, and may have lived in the Balkans in southeastern Europe until 2,000 years ago. The range of this cave lion would have included northwestern North America, Asia, and areas of Europe and would have extended from Germany, Spain, and Great Britain to the Yukon Territory. Its range also extended from Turkistan to...

Short-faced Bear, Arctodus simus
2012-04-27 19:45:45

The short-faced bear is an extinct genus of bears that was native to North America during the Pleistoscene era. Other common names include Arctodus and the bulldog bear. There are two subspecies of the short-faced bear, and one of them, Aroctodus simus, is thought to have been the largest terrestrial mammal on earth. Placed into a group of bears known as running bears or the tremarctine bears, this genus was found in Europe and the Americas. The earliest member of the tremarchtine group,...

American Lion, Panthera leo atrox or P. atrox
2012-04-26 06:05:05

The American lion (Panthera leo atrox or P. atrox) is also known as the North American lion, American cave lion, or Naegele’s giant jaguar. It is an extinct species that was native to North America and the northwestern parts of South America during the Pleistocene era. It lived up to eleven thousand years ago. During the last interglacial period in North America (the Sangamonian Stage), the American lion’s range included the Americas south of Alaska. The earliest fossils of these big cats...

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Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
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