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Last updated on April 19, 2014 at 1:20 EDT

Latest eye cancer Stories

2013-09-30 08:29:34

Patients Undergoing Genetic Test for Uveal Melanoma Will Have Option to Store Remaining Tissue for Future Use FRIENDSWOOD, Texas, Sept. 30, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Castle Biosciences Inc. announced today the availability of a tumor tissue repository for patients whose tumors are being tested with the Company's gene test for uveal, or ocular, melanoma. Patients will now have the option of storing an additional sample of their tumor free of charge for up to five years, and will be able to...

2013-02-14 12:25:57

HOUSTON, Feb. 14, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Castle Biosciences Inc., a leading developer of prognostic tests for rare cancers, announced today the launch of MyUvealMelanoma.com, a website created to educate newly diagnosed patients, their families and healthcare providers about the most common form of eye cancer. MyUvealMelanoma tells the story of this disease, its treatment and the importance of prognostic testing, through the experience of patients who recently faced this devastating diagnosis...

2012-06-08 02:23:46

JACKSONVILLE, Fla., June 8, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- The fixed beam room, or eyeline, at the University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute is up and running and radiation oncologist Robert Malyapa, M.D., Ph.D. completed treating the facility's first eye cancer patient this week. Susan Porter, a Jacksonville, Fla. native and Mandarin resident, was treated for a choroidal melanoma. This is a type of cancer that arises from one of the layers of the eye. It is a rare cancer, but it is the most...

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2010-04-14 14:15:00

First two patients receive surgical therapy at St. Louis Children's Hospital An ophthalmologist at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis is implanting radioactive discs in the eyes of children with a rare cancer in an attempt to save their vision and their eyes. J. William Harbour, MD, is one of only a few doctors nationwide to use the approach for treating a rare, childhood eye cancer, called retinoblastoma. Harbour, the Paul A. Cibis Distinguished Professor of Ophthalmology...

2009-10-13 15:32:43

Study shows bioluminescence imaging distinguishes eye tumors in vivo, leading to early treatment of eye cancer At the moment, doctors rely on biopsy analysis to determine the progression of eye cancer. However, researchers now believe that a new technology, bioluminescence imaging (BLI), will allow doctors to detect tumors earlier and quickly choose a method of treatment that doesn't necessarily involve eye surgery. BLI is a new technology that uses the making and giving off of light by an...