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Latest F/A-18 Stories

NASA Demonstrates Space Launch System Adaptive Controls
2014-03-23 14:22:05

Leslie Williams, Public Affairs, NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center Can a rocket maneuver like an airplane? And can an airplane act as a surrogate for a maneuvering rocket? NASA engineers demonstrated just that when they used a NASA F/A-18 aircraft recently to simulate a rocket in its early flight phase to test adaptive software for NASA's new rocket the Space Launch System (SLS), the largest, most powerful launch vehicle for deep space missions. The tests are helping engineers...

Algorithms Plus F/A-18 Jet Equal Vital Testing For SLS Flight Control System
2013-11-20 08:27:56

NASA Raise your hand if, in a math class, you ever said, "When will I ever use this in my life?" Four young engineers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., can answer that question: They are using math to develop algorithms, or complex step-by-step equations, that can make an F/A-18 fighter jet fly like the Space Launch System (SLS) -- NASA's next heavy-lift launch vehicle. Marshall's Eric Gilligan and Tannen VanZwieten; Jeb Orr, a Draper Laboratory employee;...

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2011-06-22 10:07:48

Southern California's high desert has been a stand-in for Mars for NASA technology testing many times over the years. And so it is again, in a series of flights by an F/A-18 aircraft to test the landing radar for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission. The flight profile is designed to have the F/A-18 climb to 40,000 feet (about 12,000 meters). From there, it makes a series of subsonic, stair-step dives at angles of 40 to 90 degrees to simulate what the Mars radar will see while the...


Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.