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Latest FASEB Journal Stories

2012-07-06 11:45:15

New research in the FASEB Journal suggests that DNA methylation is responsible for switching on and off a gene that produces the MMP13 enzyme that is known to be important in the destruction of cartilage In what could be a breakthrough in the practical application of epigenetic science, U.K. scientists used human tissue samples to discover that those with osteoarthritis have a signature epigenetic change (DNA methylation) responsible for switching on and off a gene that produces a...

2012-07-06 11:40:42

New research in the FASEB Journal suggests that the protein AMPK plays a role in protecting sensory cells in the inner ear from permanent damage and helps maintain hearing after extreme noise exposure If you're concerned about losing your hearing because of noise exposure (earbud deafness syndrome), a new discovery published online in the FASEB Journal offers some hope. That's because scientists from Germany and Canada show that the protein, AMPK, which protects cells during a lack of...

2012-07-06 10:28:06

New research in the FASEB Journal suggests that microRNA plays an important role in determining the rate of glycolysis in tumors and unused muscles, and blocking this process could have beneficial effects A new research report published online in the FASEB Journal reveals a connection among sugar, cancer, and dependence on breathing machines--microRNA-320a. In the report, Stanford scientists show that the molecule microRNA-320a is responsible for helping control glycolysis. Glycolysis is...

2012-04-30 15:35:12

New research in the FASEB Journal suggests that the 5-lipoxygenase enzyme mediates microgravity-induced lymphocyte programmed cell death and its inhibition could help astronauts and the elderly New research published online in the FASEB Journal suggests that a specific enzyme, called 5-lipoxygenase, plays a key role in cell death induced by microgravity environments, and that inhibiting this enzyme will likely help prevent or lessen the severity of immune problems in astronauts caused by...

2012-04-02 15:52:11

New research in the FASEB Journal suggests that epigenetic changes in gene structure lead to higher incidents of obesity and diabetes for mothers with poor nutrition at the time of conception If you're expecting, this might make you feel a little better about reaching for that pint of ice cream: New research published online in the FASEB Journal (http://www.fasebj.org) suggests that twins, and babies of mothers who diet around the time of conception and in early pregnancy, may have an...

2012-04-02 09:24:24

New research in the FASEB Journal suggests that a lipid pathway (15-lipoxygenase-Lipoxin A4) is less active in females because estrogen reduces the activity and expression of this pathway Estrogen causes wounds in women to heal slower than in men - who have lower levels of estrogen - says a new study published in the April 2012 issue of the FASEB Journal. In the report, scientists from the University of California, Berkeley, provide the first evidence that mild injury response in the eye...

2012-03-06 11:11:26

New research in the FASEB Journal demonstrates that a balanced delivery of genes for angiogenic factors safely grows new blood vessels in mice A new research discovery by a team of Stanford and European scientists offers hope that people with atherosclerotic disease may one day be able to avoid limb amputation related to ischemia. A new research report appearing online in the FASEB Journal suggests that the delivery of genes for two molecules naturally produced by the body, called...

2012-01-31 10:24:17

New research in the FASEB Journal describes a novel antibody that blocks inflammation that leads to transplant rejection: 'Toll-like' receptors are its target New research published online in the FASEB Journal (http://www.fasebj.org) details a new antibody, called "OPN-305" that may significantly improve survival outcomes for those receiving donated kidneys and other organs. OPN-305 works by preventing inflammation triggered by oxygen deprivation in the donated organ, allowing for better...

2012-01-13 12:10:11

New research in the FASEB Journal shows that bacteria that dwell in the gut may determine the outcome of a heart attack and that probiotics can tilt the scales in our favor New research published online in the FASEB Journal (http://www.fasebj.org) suggests that the types and levels of bacteria in the intestines may be used to predict a person's likelihood of having a heart attack, and that manipulating these organisms may help reduce heart attack risk. This discovery may lead to new...

2011-12-01 10:36:38

New research in the FASEB Journal suggests magnetic resonance imaging allows researchers to study and monitor how new vessels perform while they are 'under construction' in patients Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nanoparticle technology, researchers from Yale have devised a way to monitor the growth of laboratory-engineered blood vessels after they have been implanted in patients. This advance represents an important step toward ensuring that blood vessels, and possibly other...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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