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Latest Fauna of Asia Stories

2005-11-01 08:14:37

By Emmanuel Braun BOA VISTA, Cape Verde (Reuters) - Loggerhead turtles flock to Cape Verde's quiet, white beaches to lay their eggs but the tranquillity that draws them may be under threat as the West African islands try to lure more sun-seekers. Environmentalists warn that plans to boost tourism on the volcanic isles off Africa's Atlantic coast do not take account of the need to protect fragile species, like the turtles who nest on the shores of Boa Vista island each year. Around...

2005-10-27 04:35:00

SYDNEY -- The death of about 110 stranded whales in the southern Australian state of Tasmania was probably caused by the animals becoming disoriented in confusing coastal waters, officials said on Thursday. The long-finned pilot whales died after two separate strandings on Tuesday and Wednesday in the Marion Bay area, on the southeastern coast of the island state. Mark Pharaoh, the Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service official in charge of the incident, said the most likely reason for the...

2005-10-25 20:14:56

NEW YORK, NY (October 24, 2005)-- Scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and their Russian colleagues from the Russian Far East recently fitted three wild 40-day-old Siberian tiger cubs with tiny radio-collars, marking the youngest wild tigers to be tracked by scientists. The elastic collars, which eventually fall off as the tigers grow, weigh just over five ounces and would fit on a large house cat. They give researchers crucial insights into the needs of tiger cubs and may...

2005-09-05 14:19:05

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - More than 100,000 protected Olive Ridley sea turtles have lumbered onto a Mexican beach in recent days to lay some 10 million eggs, just weeks after poachers massacred spawning turtles on the same stretch of sand. Mexico's environmental protection agency Profepa said on Monday that the turtles had arrived in the 72 hours to Sunday at Escobilla beach in Oaxaca state, a major nesting ground on the Pacific coast that is also a hunting field for poachers who...

2005-08-22 21:53:39

CANBERRA (Reuters) - A saltwater crocodile named Sputnik is being tracked by satellite in the remote heart of Australia in a bid to learn more about the deadly creatures. Researchers from New Zealand's Massey University attached a transmitter to the back of the 4.2m (14 feet) male crocodile, which was caught in the Adelaide River about 100 km (62 miles) southeast of the tropical city of Darwin in Australia's outback Northern Territory. They plan to track Sputnik for a year to learn...

2005-08-20 20:10:10

By Robin Pomeroy LAMPEDUSA, Italy (Reuters) - The island hospital is small, sparsely equipped and very often the patients are so large that they have to be tipped sideways to get them to the operating table. Fortunately, the patients are tough enough to withstand being knocked against a doorframe -- they are protected by a solid shell bigger than a manhole cover. It takes more than rough handling to kill off a loggerhead turtle. Tough they may be, but the species is endangered...

2005-08-10 06:38:02

By Alistair Bell MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Mexican poachers bludgeoned and chopped some 80 protected Olive Ridley sea turtles to death for their eggs, believed to be an aphrodisiac, and left their shells scattered on a Pacific beach. The carnage was discovered on Escobilla beach, Mexico's top nesting ground for the animals, in the state of Oaxaca last weekend, the government's environmental protection agency Profepa said on Tuesday. "They killed them with blows to the head and machetes. It...

2005-08-04 17:04:37

NEW YORK -- Sea turtles that receive the highest protection in Costa Rica and other neighboring countries are dying by the thousands at the hands of unregulated - and unsustainable - commercial fishing in Nicaragua, according to a study by the Bronx Zoo based Wildlife Conservation Society. The study, appearing in the latest issue of the journal Herpetologica, found that turtles tagged in Nicaragua have only little more than a 50 percent chance of surviving until the next year. This includes...

2005-07-18 19:15:03

NEW YORK (July 18, 2005) -- An extremely rare "royal" turtle narrowly escaped a trip to a Chinese soup-pot, thanks to a tiny microchip implanted in its skin, according to experts from the New York-based Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), who rediscovered the species four years ago in Cambodia. Wildlife inspectors discovered the 33-pound (15 kg) turtle in a crate of confiscated wildlife in Vietnam, where smugglers planned to send the shipment on to China. The inspectors used a special...

2005-07-16 22:05:44

BEIJING (Reuters) - Chinese elephants are evolving into an increasingly tuskless breed because poaching is changing the gene pool, a newspaper reported on Sunday. Five to 10 percent of Asian elephants in China now had a gene that prevented the development of tusks, up from the usual 2 to 5 percent, the China Daily said, quoting research from Beijing Normal University. "The larger tusks the male elephant has, the more likely it will be shot by poachers," said researcher Zhang Li, an...


Latest Fauna of Asia Reference Libraries

Northern White-Cheeked Gibbon, Nomascus leucogenys
2014-04-17 15:32:09

The Northern White-Cheeked Gibbon (Nomascus leucogenys) is a species of gibbon that is native to South East Asia. It is closely related to the Southern White-Cheeked Gibbon (Nomascus siki) with which it was formerly thought to be conspecific. The females of the two species are virtually impossible to tell apart in their appearance. The genome of this species was sequenced and published in the year 2011. A considerable population of 455 critically endangered Northern White-Cheeked...

Agile Gibbon, Hylobates agilis
2014-04-17 15:21:14

The Agile Gibbon (Hylobates agilis), known also as the Black-Handed Gibbon, is an Old World primate belonging to the gibbon family. It can be found in Indonesia on the island of Sumatra, Malaysia, and southern Thailand. The species is classified as endangered on the IUCN Red List because of destruction of habitat and the pet trade. The species is usually though to have subspecies, but some experts recognize a mountain form and a lowland form; the Mountain Agile Gibbon (Hylobates agilis...

Pygmy Slow Loris, Nycticebus pygmaeus
2014-04-16 11:59:00

The pygmy slow loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus) is a primate that can be found in Laos, eastern areas of Cambodia, the Yunnan Province, and in areas east of Mekong River in Vietnam. It prefers to reside in secondary, semi-evergreen, and mixed deciduous forests. This species was formally described in 1907 by J. Lewis Bonhote and was classified as one species with all loris species, although there are now nine distinct species. The pygmy slow loris reaches an average body length between 7.7 and...

Nycticebus kayan
2014-04-16 11:34:17

Nycticebus kayan is a species of slow loris and a primate that can be found in northern and central areas of Borneo. Its range extends into East Kalimantan and Malaysia. This species prefers to reside in highland areas and it was named after a river that extends through its range known as the Kayan River. It was once classified with the Bornean slow loris, but studies conducted in 2013, focusing on physical differences, showed that it should be classified as a distinct species. Nycticebus...

Javan Slow Loris, Nycticebus javanicus
2014-04-16 11:28:14

The Javan slow loris (Nycticebus javanicus) is a species of primate that can be found in central and western areas on the island of Java, Indonesia. This species resides in a number of habitats including primary and secondary forests, bamboo forests, and plantations at elevations between sea level and 5,200 feet. This species was formally described in 1812 by √Čtienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, but was reclassified as a subspecies of Bradylemur tardigradus in 1840. It was not until 2000 that it...

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