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Latest Fauna of Asia Stories

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2007-01-19 16:10:00

SOUTH PADRE ISLAND, Texas -- At least three dozen sea turtles are getting a little vacation under heat lamps in this spring-break capital after being rescued from an arctic blast that caused the water temperature in an arm of the Gulf of Mexico to plummet 18 degrees in 48 hours. The cold-blooded animals were left comatose by the rapid temperature drop this week in the shallow bay where the young turtles feed. Animal rescuers feared the cold would kill the turtles or make them so sluggish as...

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2006-11-14 15:45:00

World's most endangered big cat is assessed by experts then released NEW YORK -- Just three days after catching a Siberian tiger in the Russian Far East, an international team led by biologists from the Wildlife Conservation Society captured another species last week that carries the dubious distinction of being the world's most endangered big cat: an extremely Far Eastern leopard. One of only 30 left in the wild, the animal was captured in a "trapline" "“ a series of snares set out by...

2006-04-12 07:42:55

By Tom Brown EVERGLADES NATIONAL PARK, Florida (Reuters) - The man leading efforts to eradicate giant Burmese python snakes from Everglades National Park sounds almost fearful, and certainly not optimistic, when he talks about the chances of wiping out an invasive species he calls "the enemy." That is partly because Skip Snow, a 54-year-old veteran wildlife biologist with the U.S. National Park Service, says he doesn't know how many of the slithery monsters are in the swampy Florida...

2006-04-12 07:40:00

By Tom Brown EVERGLADES NATIONAL PARK, Florida -- The man leading efforts to eradicate giant Burmese python snakes from Everglades National Park sounds almost fearful, and certainly not optimistic, when he talks about the chances of wiping out an invasive species he calls "the enemy." That is partly because Skip Snow, a 54-year-old veteran wildlife biologist with the U.S. National Park Service, says he doesn't know how many of the slithery monsters are in the swampy Florida park. "It could be...

2006-04-12 07:07:59

By Tom Brown EVERGLADES NATIONAL PARK, Florida (Reuters) - The man leading efforts to eradicate giant Burmese python snakes from Everglades National Park sounds almost fearful, and certainly not optimistic, when he talks about the chances of wiping out an invasive species he calls "the enemy." That is partly because Skip Snow, a 54-year-old veteran wildlife biologist with the U.S. National Park Service, says he doesn't know how many of the slithery monsters are in the swampy Florida...

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2006-03-03 20:20:00

By Christopher Doering WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. government plans to look into possible changes in laws protecting zoo elephants after an animal welfare group complained that many were kept in cramped conditions that caused arthritis and foot disease and could be deadly. The Agriculture Department said on Friday it would seek public comment on a petition filed last month by the group, In Defense of Animals, accusing U.S. zoos of violating the Animal Welfare Act by keeping elephants in...

2006-03-03 20:24:09

By Patricia Wilson WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Five weeks after the U.S. National Zoo put down one of its elephants, veterinarians artificially inseminated another, hoping to add one more notable birth at an institution hit by high-profile deaths. Shanthi, a 30-year-old 9,000-pound (4,000-kg) Asian elephant stood in a training chute -- a contraption with bars to restrain her gently -- and a keeper fed her treats while the zoo's experts and a team of German veterinary scientists used...

2006-01-31 00:50:00

LONDON -- Scientists have offered a ray of hope to Asian vultures being wiped out in India after eating the corpses of cattle treated with a common anti-inflammatory drug. And they called on the Indian government, which has already banned the use of the drug diclofenac, to intensify a captive breeding program for threatened Oriental white-backed, long-billed and slender-billed vultures. Writing on Tuesday in the journal PLoS Biology, the scientists from Britain, India, South Africa and...

2005-12-20 22:30:00

WELLINGTON (Reuters) - Hundreds of volunteers refloated more than 100 pilot whales stranded on a beach at the top of New Zealand's South Island on Wednesday and conservation authorities prepared to herd the mammals out to sea to keep them from returning. The volunteers, who included tourists, refloated the beached whales just before high tide at around 2 p.m. (0100 GMT), about 24 hours after they were stranded. "Once we've got them refloated, there'll be some boats used to try to herd them...

2005-12-20 06:10:00

By Nazimuddin Shaymol CHITTAGONG, Bangladesh (Reuters) - Asian elephant numbers are falling because of deforestation, road-building and expansion of farmlands and plans to protect remaining populations are crucial, wildlife experts meeting in Bangladesh said. The South Asian wildlife experts concluded a two-day meeting in southern Bangladesh on Tuesday with an agreement for joint collaboration to protect elephants, whose numbers across Asia are now 60,000, down from 150,000 two decades ago....


Latest Fauna of Asia Reference Libraries

Colugos, Cynocephalidae
2014-08-05 09:51:41

Cynocephalidae is a family that holds three species of gliding, tree dwelling mammals known as culugos or flying lemurs, only two of which are living. These species, known as the Philippine flying lemur and the Sunda flying lemur, can be found in tropical rainforests in Southeast Asia. Culugos range in size between fourteen and sixteen inches and they have a slender body with long legs and a medium-sized tail. They are the most capable of all gliding mammal species, using a large membrane of...

Bekisar
2014-06-19 14:20:21

The Bekisar, also known as the Ayam Bekisar, is the first generation of hybrid chicken developed from the cross of the green junglefowl and the domestic red junglefowl. Although the exact origin of this breed is unknown, Javanese and Sudanese people assert that it was first developed on the Kangean Islands in Java. The earliest members of this breed were used for communication, because each rooster’s call was unique and due to its ancestry, very loud. Roosters were placed in baskets on the...

Northern White-Cheeked Gibbon, Nomascus leucogenys
2014-04-17 15:32:09

The Northern White-Cheeked Gibbon (Nomascus leucogenys) is a species of gibbon that is native to South East Asia. It is closely related to the Southern White-Cheeked Gibbon (Nomascus siki) with which it was formerly thought to be conspecific. The females of the two species are virtually impossible to tell apart in their appearance. The genome of this species was sequenced and published in the year 2011. A considerable population of 455 critically endangered Northern White-Cheeked...

Agile Gibbon, Hylobates agilis
2014-04-17 15:21:14

The Agile Gibbon (Hylobates agilis), known also as the Black-Handed Gibbon, is an Old World primate belonging to the gibbon family. It can be found in Indonesia on the island of Sumatra, Malaysia, and southern Thailand. The species is classified as endangered on the IUCN Red List because of destruction of habitat and the pet trade. The species is usually though to have subspecies, but some experts recognize a mountain form and a lowland form; the Mountain Agile Gibbon (Hylobates agilis...

Pygmy Slow Loris, Nycticebus pygmaeus
2014-04-16 11:59:00

The pygmy slow loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus) is a primate that can be found in Laos, eastern areas of Cambodia, the Yunnan Province, and in areas east of Mekong River in Vietnam. It prefers to reside in secondary, semi-evergreen, and mixed deciduous forests. This species was formally described in 1907 by J. Lewis Bonhote and was classified as one species with all loris species, although there are now nine distinct species. The pygmy slow loris reaches an average body length between 7.7 and...

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Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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