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Latest Fauna of the United Kingdom Stories

Whiskers Were An Important Evolutionary Milestone For Mammals
2011-11-11 12:53:35

Researchers have found that moveable whiskers on rats and mice were an important milestone in the evolution of mammals from reptiles. The team used high-speed digital video recording and automatic tracking to discover how rodents move their whiskers back-and-forth at high speed. This behavior, known as whisking, allows mice or rats to accurately determine the position, shape and texture of objects, make decisions about objects, and use the information to build environmental maps. The...

2011-06-14 09:06:00

HARRISBURG, Pa., June 14, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- With general hunting license sales underway, Pennsylvania Game Commission Executive Director Carl G. Roe reminded hunters that county treasurers will begin accepting antlerless deer license applications from resident hunters starting Monday, July 11 and from nonresidents beginning Monday, July 25. For the 2011-12 license year, antlerless deer license fees are the same as they have been since 1999, except for the 70-cent transaction...

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2010-12-15 11:24:33

University of Guelph researchers have finally figured out why female squirrels are so darn promiscuous. Turns out it has nothing to do with genes and everything to do with how many males are knocking at their door. "Their behaviour is overwhelmingly influenced by opportunity," said graduate student Eryn McFarlane, who, along with integrative biology professor Andrew McAdam and a team of researchers from across Canada, solved a mystery that has baffled biologists for years. Their findings...

2010-11-15 13:46:00

HARRISBURG, Pa., Nov. 15, 2010 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Pennsylvania's only unofficial holiday - the Monday after Thanksgiving, which marks the opening day of the two-week general deer season - will feature nearly 750,000 individuals sporting fluorescent orange and camouflage clothing throughout Penn's Woods, according to Pennsylvania Game Commission Executive Director Carl G. Roe. "Pennsylvania's deer season has a dramatic and beneficial effect on the Commonwealth, as it provides...

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2010-10-27 06:10:00

A giant red stag believed to be the UK's biggest wild animal was killed for its antlers, according to reports on Tuesday. "The Emperor of Exmoor," as the beast has been dubbed, was named after the southwestern area where the stag frequented. The deer, which was about 12 years old, weighed more than 300 pounds, and stood more than 9 feet tall was found close to the road dead in the county of Devon. It is believed that a licensed hunter is responsible for legally killing the stag. But the...

2010-06-24 08:06:00

HARRISBURG, Pa., June 24 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Pennsylvania Game Commission Executive Director Carl G. Roe today reminded hunters that county treasurers will begin accepting antlerless deer license applications from resident hunters starting Monday, July 12; and from nonresidents beginning Monday, July 26. For the 2010-11 license year, antlerless deer license fees are the same as they have been since 1999, except for the 70-cent transaction fee attached to the purchase of each...

2010-05-05 15:58:00

RICHMOND, Va., May 5 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- It's that time of year again when white-tailed deer fawns are showing up in yards and hayfields and concerned citizens want to know how to help. In almost all cases, the best way to help is to simply give the fawn space and leave it alone. Concerned people sometimes pick up animals that they think are orphaned. Most such "orphans" that good-intentioned citizens "rescue" every spring should have been left alone. Most wild animals will not...

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2010-04-09 08:50:00

The vocalizations or "Ëœgroans' of male fallow deer provide rivals and potential mates with an honest account of the emitting animal's competitive abilities. A study, published in the open access journal BMC Biology, describes how the acoustic qualities of a deer's call change year by year and reflect changes in status and age. Alan McElligott and Elodie Briefer from Queen Mary, University of London together with Elisabetta Vannoni, University of Zurich, studied fallow deer, during...

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2009-12-23 09:35:00

Details of the lifestyle of mink, which escaped from fur farms and now live wild in the UK, have been revealed through analysis of their whiskers. Research led by the University of Exeter reveals more about the diet of this invasive species and provides a clue to its whereabouts. There are now plans to use the findings to eradicate it from environments where it can be devastating to native species. Published in the Journal of Applied Ecology, the study focused on American mink living in the...

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2009-10-29 15:39:57

Spanish researchers have confirmed that the largest bat in Europe, Nyctalus lasiopterus, was present in north-eastern Spain during the Late Pleistocene (between 120,000 and 10,000 years ago). The Greater Noctule fossils found in the excavation site at Abríc Romaní (Barcelona) prove that this bat had a greater geographical presence more than 10,000 years ago than it does today, having declined due to the reduction in vegetation cover. Although this research...


Latest Fauna of the United Kingdom Reference Libraries

Natterjack Toad, Epidalea calamita
2014-09-16 16:07:34

The natterjack toad, Epidalea Calamita, formerly Bufo calamita, is a toad endemic to sandy and heathland areas of Europe. The adults are about 60 to 70 millimeters long and are set apart from common toads by a yellow colored line that runs down the middle of the back. They have fairly short legs, and this provides them with a characteristic step, compared to the hopping movement of many other toad species. Natterjacks have a very loud and distinct mating call, amplified by the single vocal...

Grey Seal, Halichoerus grypus
2012-11-05 11:36:13

The grey seal (Halichoerus grypus), known as the gray seal in the United States is a species that can be found on shores on both sides of the North Atlantic Ocean. Its other common names include the Atlantic grey seal and the horsehead seal, because of its elongated nose. It has a large range on the shores of Ireland and Great Britain, with larger populations residing in areas including the Farne Islands near the Northumberland Coast, North Rona near northern Scotland, and Ramsey Island near...

Greater Horseshoe Bat, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum
2012-09-03 06:50:52

The greater horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum) can be found in Japan, Africa, Europe, China, South Asia, Korea, and Australia. It prefers a habitat in warm regions, with open scrub and trees, human settlements, and bodies of water like ponds. It will also inhabit older orchards, glades within woodlands, and permanent pastures, among other areas. Many of its roosts occur in houses in the northern areas of its range and in caves in the southern areas of its range. These bats travel to...

Field Vole, Microtus agrestis
2012-08-05 21:06:26

The field vole (Microtus agrestis) is native to Europe, inhabiting a large range that includes Poland, France, Germany, and Belgium, among many other areas. It is not found in Ireland or in Iceland. It prefers a habitat within moist grasslands, like marshes and woodlands and along riverbanks. The population density of the field vole will fluctuate throughout a four-year period. The field vole will dig burrows underground, but it most commonly builds nests on the surface. It reaches an...

Common Vole, Microtus arvalis
2012-08-05 21:02:11

The common vole (Microtus arvalis) is native to Eurasia, with a very large range stretching across many areas. Its preferred habitat includes all areas besides densely forested areas. It will inhabit agricultural lands, and as a result will end up eating the crops found there, although it prefers grass. The common vole varies slightly in size between sexes, with males weighing an average of 1.7 ounces and females weighing 1.4 ounces if not pregnant. It will inhabit home ranges of up to .3...

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Word of the Day
negawatt
  • A unit of saved energy.
Coined by Amory Lovins, chairman of the Rocky Mountain Institute as a contraction of negative watt on the model of similar compounds like megawatt.