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Latest Fear Stories

Social Anxiety Or Shyness
2012-11-19 20:11:45

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online A paper published in the Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics looks into where to draw the line between social anxiety and just being shy. Many experts have separate opinions over whether someone suffers from shyness and social anxiety disorder (SAD). The team decided to explore the mental disorder, as well as treatment options and its impact on daily life. "There are many differing opinions about social anxiety disorder and the...

Why Are Some People Afraid To Relax
2012-11-15 06:24:37

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Phobias are irrational fears. Whether it´s fear of flying, public speaking, snakes or the dark, these phobias are usually manifested after a traumatic experience that plants itself deep in the subconscious of the sufferer. A phobia can continue to hold sway over an individual even though that person can understand the irrationality of it. And if one avoids the source of their phobia it typically can increase the sense of worry...

Child Nighttime Fears Result of Fantasy-Reality Confusion
2012-11-14 10:29:57

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Most children experience nighttime fears at some point in their development, whether it is monsters under the bed or boogeymen in the closet. Most children outgrow these fears without professional help, but some contend with them for extended periods of time. For these children, experts say, there is a risk of developing anxiety problems later in life. Professor Avi Sadeh of Tel Aviv University's School of Psychological Sciences is...

Emotional Communication Uses Sense Of Smell
2012-11-06 12:58:08

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online While is it well known that many species transmit information via chemical signals, the extent to which these chemosignals play a role in human communication is unknown. Researchers from Utrecht University in the Netherlands have investigated whether we humans might actually be able to communicate with each other about our emotional states through chemical signals. The findings of the study were recently published in the journal...

Math Can Really Hurt
2012-11-02 04:01:41

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Some lucky people have a proclivity for number crunching and difficult equations, but for many of us the idea of performing complex calculations is more horrifying than a Friday the 13th movie marathon. And, like Jason Voorhees´ two-foot machete plunging into his victim´s abdomen – the personal anxiety surrounding an impending math exam can actually cause people to feel physical pain, according to new research from the...

Spatial Perception Influenced By Fear
2012-10-29 05:41:33

Jedidiah Becker for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online When it comes to providing an objective account of the world around us, the human brain can be a notoriously inaccurate and biased reporter. Scholarly literature in the fields of psychology and neuroscience are full of studies that demonstrate how the brain 'fudges' the picture of reality with which it presents our conscious mind, often favoring a useful or convenient interpretation of our surroundings over a strictly accurate one....

Distortion Of Time Perception Offset By Sense Of Control
2012-10-25 09:28:13

Jedidiah Becker for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online There are few more fascinating and mind-bending frontiers in fields of neuroscience and psychology than the study of how the brain perceives time. While symphonies, stock markets and our daily schedules are conveniently constructed around the well-defined, predictable progression of what might be called 'objective time', our brains take a much more flexible approach to dealing with passing events, stretching, condensing and...

Spatial Perception Influenced By Fear
2012-10-22 12:48:06

Read my exclusive interview with Dr. Matthew Longo about his research. Jedidiah Becker for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online One of the many mind-bending lessons that neuroscience has taught us in recent years is that our brain often ℠fudges´ the picture of reality that it gives us. For a very simple at-home demonstration of this cognitive trickery, stand in front of a mirror and alternate back and forth between looking at your left eye, then your right eye. No matter...

2012-10-19 04:02:27

Panic and anxiety disorders affect millions of Americans each and every day. In fact, the number of people diagnosed with panic and anxiety disorders has steadily increased over the last several years. Pacific Palisades, CA (PRWEB) October 18, 2012 Panic and anxiety disorders affect millions of Americans each and every day. In fact, the number of people diagnosed with panic and anxiety disorders has steadily increased over the last several years. In direct response to this troubling trend,...

2012-10-16 11:36:29

A brain pathway that is stimulated by traumatic or fearful experiences can be disrupted by two compounds that show promise for preventing post-traumatic stress disorder, Indiana University researchers reported. In a presentation prepared for the Neuroscience 2012 scientific conference in New Orleans Oct. 13 to 17, Anantha Shekhar and colleagues from IU reported the results of experiments with rats using a standard methodology called a conditioned fear test. The neural signaling...


Latest Fear Reference Libraries

Spectrophobia
2013-12-24 12:23:34

Spectrophobia is a kind of specific phobia involving a morbid fear of mirrors. Catoptrophobia is the fear of mirrors. This phobia is distinct from Eisoptrophobia, which is the fear of your own reflection. In general, an individual suffering from this phobia has been traumatized in an event where they believe they have seen or heard apparitions or ghosts. The individual could also become traumatized by television shows, nightmares, or horror films. This fear could be the result of a trauma...

Ophidiophobia
2013-12-24 09:20:10

Ophidiophobia or ophiophobia is a particular form of specific phobia, the abnormal fear of snakes. Fear of snakes is occasionally referred to as a more general term, herpetophobia, fear of reptiles and/or amphibians. The word comes from the Greek ophis, which is in reference to snakes and phobia, meaning fear. Numerous symptoms are common among ophidiophobes including a feeling of uncontrollable anxiety when thinking about or are exposed to snakes, the feeling that you must do everything...

Acrophobia
2013-10-21 09:15:37

Acrophobia, derived from the Greek: ákron, meaning "peak, summit, edge”, is an intense, irrational fear of heights. This is a somewhat common fear; between 2 and 5 percent of the general population suffer from a fear of heights, and twice the number of sufferers are female. Like most phobias, Acrophobia is generally attributed to a traumatic incident involving heights; however, recent studies have questioned this theory, due to the prevalence of this phobia. Some studies have suggested...

Generalized Anxiety Disorder
2013-07-25 15:07:54

Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) is an anxiety disorder with worry about normal, everyday situations such as finance, health and wellbeing in relationships (personal and work related) all lasting longer than six months. Symptoms The symptoms of GAD can include but are not limited to difficulty swallowing, rashes, shortness of breath, fidgeting, headaches, tension, nausea, etc. In order for GAD to be ruled as present, the symptoms and feelings must be experiences for at least six...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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