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Latest Feather Stories

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2009-08-26 07:40:00

Known for their wide variety of vibrant plumage, birds have evolved various chemical and physical mechanisms to produce these beautiful colors over millions of years. A team of paleontologists and ornithologists led by Yale University has now discovered evidence of vivid iridescent colors in feather fossils more than 40 million years old. The finding, published online August 26 in Biology Letters, signifies the first evidence of a preserved color-producing nanostructure in a fossilized...

2009-08-06 06:35:00

ADA, Okla., Aug. 6 /PRNewswire/ -- Cultural artifacts of historical significance are often lost with the passing of time, leaving only those things that have been made of stone or bone -- or that have been expertly encased. To the Chickasaw and other southeastern Native American tribes one artifact hard-pressed to withstand the wages of time -- the feather cape -- was made to honor tribal elders and leaders. Written in the voice of tribal elder Robert Perry, "The Turkey Feather Cape: My...

2009-08-05 07:15:00

DES PLAINES, Ill., Aug. 5 /PRNewswire/ -- United Feather & Down, the nation's premier purveyor of luxury down for use in high-quality bedding is, for the first time, offering unprecedented value for online shoppers. The company is introducing a Web site, http://www.ufandd.com, the new online home for United Feather & Down's Factory Outlet Store. Consumers will find a wide selection of bedding essentials from cushy down pillows to down or down-alternative comforters and duvets,...

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2009-08-03 12:30:00

Recent studies have shown that birds sporting brightly colored plumage are more susceptible to being infected with feather-eating bacterium, according to a BBC Earth report. The bacterial infection can harm the birds' health and cause their feathers to become dull. The discovery comes from a study that found 99% of all Eastern bluebirds observed in the state of Virginia to be afflicted with feather-degrading bacteria. Although this kind of bacteria was first found 10 years ago, the latest...

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2009-07-22 14:00:00

Scientists in Nevada are reporting development of a new and environmentally friendly process for producing biodiesel fuel from "chicken feather meal," made from the 11 billion pounds of poultry industry waste that accumulate annually in the United States alone. Their study is scheduled for the July 22 issue of ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, a bi-weekly publication.In the study Mano Misra, Susanta Mohapatra, Narasimharao Kondamudi, and Jason Strull note that chicken feather...

2009-07-14 10:33:38

A new study finds that a change in a single gene has sent two closely related bird populations on their way to becoming two distinct species. The study, published in the August issue of the American Naturalist, is one of only a few to investigate the specific genetic changes that drive two populations toward speciation.Speciation, the process by which different populations of the same species split into separate species, is central to evolution. But it's notoriously hard to observe in action....

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2009-07-09 07:46:42

Catching adult eagles for research is a difficult task, so scientists at Purdue University say they are using eagle feathers to learn more about the birds. Many birds are small, easy to catch and abundant, Associate Professor Andrew DeWoody, who is leading the study, said. With eagles, the effort can be 100 to 1,000 times greater than catching chickadees. Not only do eagles, with their sharp talons and beaks, pose a physical threat to the scientists, but the birds can badly injure themselves...

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2009-07-06 14:35:00

Catching adult eagles for research purposes is no easy task, but a Purdue University researcher has found a way around the problem, and, in the process, gathered even more information about the birds without ever laying a hand on one."Many birds are small, easy to catch and abundant," said Andrew DeWoody, associate professor of forestry and natural resources. "With eagles, the effort can be 100 to 1,000 times greater than catching chickadees."Eagles can be hard to find, they often require...

2009-07-06 11:38:24

Australian and New Zealand scientists say they have completed the first DNA-based reconstruction of the giant extinct moa bird. Researchers from the University of Adelaide and New Zealand's Landcare Research Ltd. said they used prehistoric feathers recovered from caves and rock shelters to identify four moa species after retrieving ancient DNA from the feathers believed to be at least 2,500 years old. The giant birds -- measuring up to 8.2 feet and weighing 550 pounds -- were the dominant...

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2009-06-10 09:47:06

Smithsonian Institution scientists say the birds that struck a plane in New York, forcing it into the Hudson River in January, were migratory Canadian geese. The researchers said they examined the feather remains from the Jan. 15 US Airways Flight 1549 bird strike and determined the geese were from a migratory, rather than resident, population. Scientists in the Feather Identification Laboratory at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History said they used molecular genetic...


Latest Feather Reference Libraries

Rosy Feather Star, Antedon bifida
2013-04-30 15:09:13

The rosy feather star (Antedon bifida) is a species of crinoid that can be found in northwestern waters of Europe. Its range extends from Portugal in the south to the Shetland Islands and includes Venezuela, West Africa, Algeria, and Tunisia. This species resides at an average depth of 650 feet, although it can occasionally be found in deeper waters. The rosy feather star has a disc shaped body that is concave and holds ten arms that resemble a fern. These arms can grow to be ten inches...

Rosy feather star, Antedon bifida
2013-04-27 07:35:37

The Rosy feather star is a species of starfish in the Antedonidae family. It is found in North West Europe along the coast. The specific area of the coast is between the Shetland Islands south to Portugal. There have been sightings in Algeria, Tunisia, West Africa and Venezuela. The Western and Eastern coasts of the British Isles has a climate that promotes the growth of the Antedon bifida. It grows between the low tide mark and 650 feet deeper. Clinging to rocks, seaweed and mollusks, it...

Giant Feather Duster Worm, Eudistylia polymorpha
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The Giant Feather Duster Worm (Eudistylia polymorpha) is a species of marine polychaete worm of the Sabellidae family. Its range extends along the western coast of North America, from Alaska to California. It is most commonly found in the intertidal zone in tide pools and in the neritic (coastal) zone at depths up to 1,375 feet. It is often found in groups along rocks, reefs, pilings, wharves and marinas. Its common name comes from the crown of tentacles extended when the animal is under...

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2009-08-18 17:26:24

Caudipteryx, meaning "tail feather", is a genus of small theropod dinosaur that lived during the Aptian Age of the Early Cretaceous Period (124 million years ago). There are two species known, C. zoui (described 1998) and C. dongi. (described 2000). It was first discovered in 1997 in the Yixian Formation of the Sihetun area of Liaoning Province, northeastern China. The genus appears to have been fairly common, though isolated to the small region where it has been found. This region was also...

Red-shouldered Macaw, Diopsittaca nobilis
2009-06-04 22:50:45

The Red-shouldered Macaw (Diopsittaca nobilis), also known as the Noble Macaw, Long-wing Macaw, and Hahn's Macaw, is a species of parrot native to Venezuela, the Guianas, Bolivia, Brazil, and far south-eastern Peru. It is found mostly in tropical lowlands, savannah and swamplands. This is not considered an endangered species, although populations in the wild have declined due to habitat loss. Though not considered endangered, it is illegal to export wild caught birds of this species. The...

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Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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