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Latest Fecal bacteriotherapy Stories

2014-09-08 16:25:18

Phase I/II study also demonstrated SER-109 restoration of a diverse, healthy microbiome CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Sept. 8, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Seres Health, a clinical-stage therapeutics company developing novel treatments for diseases related to the human microbiome, today announced final data for its single-arm, open-label clinical trial of SER-109, its first-in-field, oral microbiome therapeutic. SER-109, a mixture of bacterial spores, is designed for the treatment of recurrent...

packrat
2014-07-22 03:30:57

University of Utah Woodrats lost their ability to eat toxic creosote bushes after antibiotics killed their gut microbes. Woodrats that never ate the plants were able to do so after receiving fecal transplants with microbes from creosote-eaters, University of Utah biologists found. The new study confirms what biologists long have suspected: bacteria in the gut – and not just liver enzymes – are “crucial in allowing herbivores to feed on toxic plants,” says biologist Kevin Kohl, a...

2014-06-30 08:29:30

-- Company Expects to Initiate C. difficile Clinical Trials in 2014 -- ROCKVILLE, Md., June 30, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Synthetic Biologics, Inc. (NYSE MKT: SYN), a developer of novel anti-infective biologic and drug candidates targeting specific pathogens that cause serious infections and diseases, announced today the formation of a Clinical Advisory Board (CAB) to support development of SYN-004, the Company's lead anti-infective product candidate for the prevention of the devastating...

2014-06-17 12:37:42

American Society for Microbiology Fecal microbiota transplantation --- the process of delivering stool bacteria from a healthy donor to a patient suffering from intestinal infection with the bacterium Clostridium difficile --- works by restoring healthy bacteria and functioning to the recipient's gut, according to a study published this week in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. The study provides insight into the structural and potential...

2014-04-25 09:18:08

Mass. General study identifies more acceptable way to administer treatment for dangerous recurrent infection A pilot study by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators may lead to greater availability and acceptability of an unusual treatment for a serious medical problem – use of fecal material from healthy donors to treat recurrent diarrhea caused by the Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) bacteria. In their paper being published online in the journal Clinical Infectious...

2013-12-04 16:01:15

Infants and toddlers frequently carry toxigenic Clostridium difficile, usually with no harm to themselves, but can serve as a reservoir and spread the bacteria to adults in whom it can cause severe disease, according to a study by a team of Swedish researchers published ahead of print in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology. In the study, which involved following 42 children from birth to 1 ½ or 3 years, the investigators found that C. difficile strains persisted for more than six months...

Poop Pill Cures Intestinal Infections
2013-10-04 12:24:35

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Recent studies have shown infections with the bacteria Clostridium difficile (C. diff) can be cured if other bacteria can be transplanted into the patient’s gut. Doctors from Amsterdam, Canada and elsewhere have successfully transferred these bacteria by means of fecal transplant, or placing a sterile stool sample from a healthy person into the patient’s stomach. Tests have shown this procedure is highly effective, curing up to 94...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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