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Latest Fellows of the Royal Society Stories

2008-08-07 09:00:18

Children from a Year 11 science class are walking across the beach on Dorset's Jurassic Coast, picking up pebble after pebble in search of evidence of evolution. For some, the exciting discovery of ammonite fossils hidden inside the rock, and clear explanations from presenter and scientist Richard Dawkins of what they are looking at add enough physical proof to their classroom lesson to convince them that Charles Darwin's theory - first published 150 years ago - is correct. But several of...

2008-07-30 03:00:35

By Zaleski, Carol THE NEW ATHEIST movement has reached its high-water mark, and there are signs that it is starting to recede. Wishful thinking, you say? Aren't there more and more antireligious tracts on the bestseller lists? Aren't these writers terribly clever? Perhaps so, yet somehow they fail to capture the imagination. There have been times-above all during the 19th century-when the debate between belief and unbelief was a more spirited adventure, engaging combatants of wonderful...

2008-07-26 00:00:27

By BILL STONE Theatre Writer NEXT month the world-renowned company Complicite returns to the Theatre Royal with their latest production, A Disappearing Number. This tale has two interwoven strands - one an historical snapsnot of the relationship between a Cambridge professor and an Indian mathematician, the other a fictitious love affair between a futures dealer and a lecturer excitedly passing on mathematical discoveries to her pupils - which can be enjoyed on many levels. But anyone...

2008-07-01 15:00:32

A SERIES of events to honour the life, ideas and impact of Charles Darwin are to be held at Edinburgh Zoo. It is taking part in Darwin200, a national celebration of the famous naturalist, which starts today. The celebrations cover three anniversaries. Today it is 150 years since Darwin first presented his theory of evolution; his 200th birthday is on February 12, 2009; and in November next year it will be 150 years since the controversial publication of his definitive work On the Origin...

2007-10-12 06:00:00

By Kenny, Robert Abstract. This paper examines the debate engendered in ethnological and anthropological circles by Darwin's Origin of Species and its effects. The debate was more about the nature of human diversity than about transmutation. By 1859 many polygenists thought monogenism had been clearly shown to be an antiquated and essentially religious concept. Yet the doctrine of natural selection gave rise to a 'new monogenism'. Proponents of polygenism such as James Hunt claimed natural...

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2006-11-28 07:52:55

Renowned physicist Stephen Hawking is being honored with the world's oldest award for scientific achievement, with a special high-altitude assist from NASA. The British Royal Society is awarding Professor Hawking its prestigious Copley Medal on Nov. 30 for his contributions to theoretical physics and theoretical cosmology. The silver gilt medal flew on space shuttle Discovery's July 2006 mission to the International Space Station, at the initiative of crew member Piers Sellers, a native of...

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2006-07-13 13:55:00

WASHINGTON -- Finches on the Galapagos Islands that inspired Charles Darwin to develop the concept of evolution are now helping confirm it - by evolving. A medium sized species of Darwin's finch has evolved a smaller beak to take advantage of different seeds just two decades after the arrival of a larger rival for its original food source. The altered beak size shows that species competing for food can undergo evolutionary change, said Peter Grant of Princeton University, lead author of the...

2006-06-07 16:18:32

CHICAGO (Reuters) - The 109-year-old Yerkes Observatory, where astronomers discovered the Milky Way galaxy's spiral shape and made other advances, will become an anchor for a spa and luxury homes, the University of Chicago, its owner, announced on Wednesday. Thirty of the 80 acres along Lake Geneva in Wisconsin that surround the ornate, stone observatory housing what was once the world's largest telescope will remain undeveloped. Private developer Mirbeau Cos. agreed to pay the...

2006-03-28 14:07:32

LONDON (Reuters) - A last-minute deal reached on Tuesday ensures a manuscript charting the birth of modern science, lost for more than 200 years, will be housed at the Royal Society rather than falling into private hands. Hailed as "science's missing link," the journal of Robert Hooke had been due to go on sale at auction with a price tag in excess of 1 million pounds. But just before the sale was due to take place, auctioneers Bonhams said an anonymous private bidder had agreed to...

2006-03-27 09:05:49

By Jeremy Lovell LONDON (Reuters) - A manuscript charting the birth of modern science, lost for more than 200 years, goes on sale on Tuesday with a price tag in excess of one million pounds. Hailed as "science's missing link," the journal of Robert Hooke contains details of experiments he conducted as curator at the Royal Society from 1662 and his correspondence as its secretary from 1677. It was found by chance in a cupboard at a private house in Hampshire by experts from...


Latest Fellows of the Royal Society Reference Libraries

Admiral Sir George Back
2014-01-07 10:58:04

Admiral Sir George Back FRS, born November 6th of 1796 and died on June 23rd of 1878, was a British naval officer, naturalist, artist, and explorer of the Canadian Arctic. He was born in Stockport. When he was a boy, he went to sea as a volunteer in the frigate HMS Arethusa in the year 1808 and participated in the destruction of batteries on the Spanish coast. In the following year he was involved in the fighting in the Bay of Biscay up until he was captured by the French. He remained a...

William Buckland
2013-10-14 14:04:00

William Buckland (March 12, 1784 – August 14, 1856) was an English theologian, ordained Anglican minister, geologist, and the prominent paleontologist of his day. He pioneered the use of fossilized feces, which he named “coprolites,” in the study and reconstruction of ancient ecosystems. Buckland is perhaps best known for naming and describing the very first recognized dinosaur fossil, the Megalosaurus, before the term “dinosaur” ever existed. Buckland was born at Axminster in...

Zoological Journal
2012-04-24 18:24:00

The Zoological Journal was a scientific journal published in the early nineteenth century on a quarterly basis. It was devoted entirely to zoology (animal kingdom). It was published in London by W. Philips. It featured “Original Communications, Translations of new and interesting Papers from Foreign sources and notices of new and remarkable facts in any way connected with Zoology," according to Gentlemen’s Magazine, 1823. The journal’s editors were Thomas Bell, John George Children,...

Iguanodon
2012-01-11 16:16:53

Iguanodon, meaning “Iguana tooth,” is a genus of ornithopod dinosaur known from the Kimmeridgian age of the Late Jurassic Period to the Cenomanian age of the Late Cretaceous Period. It lived in Asia, Europe and North America. Research in the early 2000s suggests however that only one species, I. bernissartensis, is well-substantiated, and lived during the Early Cretaceous Period in Europe. It was first discovered in 1822 and described three years later by English geologist Gideon...

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2013-03-16 00:00:00

Antonio de Ulloa was born on January 12, 1716 in Seville. Ulloa enlisted with the Spanish Navy in 1733. In 1735, he was sent to Ecuador as a member of the French Geodesic Mission. The mission, led by Pierre Bouguer, was organized by the French Academy of Sciences to measure a degree of the meridian at the equator. He stayed in Ecuador for 9 years until 1744, during this stint; he discovered platinum with his partner, Jorge Juan. In 1745, he returned to Spain. However, while enroute to...

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Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.