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Latest Fellows of the Royal Society Stories

2005-07-24 22:10:47

LONDON (Reuters) - Sir Richard Doll, the British scientist whose research first established the link between smoking and lung cancer, has died aged 92. Oxford University said Doll, who gave up smoking after his groundbreaking work in the late 1940s, died on Sunday in hospital after a short illness. "His pioneering epidemiological work has led to the dramatic reduction in smoking rates in Britain over the past 50 years," John Hood, the university's vice-chancellor, said in a statement....

2004-11-30 06:00:11

Nobel prize-winning chemist Professor Sir Harry Kroto, left, has handed back his honourary degree to Exeter University in protest at its plans to close its chemistry department. Sir Harry received the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1996 for his work in discovering a new form of carbon, the C60 molecule. Exeter plans to cut a predicted deficit of nearly pounds 4.5m by cutting up to 130 jobs in three departments.

2004-11-30 03:00:09

Madam, - Needing something soothing to peruse over breakfast this morning, I somewhat belatedly read William Reville's article about Science Week (Science Today, November 18th). Suddenly a sentence caught my eye, which caused me to splutter over my porridge: "Science is not fun," it read. As a practising scientist for several decades, let me assure your readers that for many of us science (and especially chemistry) continues to be fun. Dr Reville goes on to comment on the demonstration...

2004-11-26 09:00:12

Birmingham University yesterday paid tribute to one of its former graduates, Nobel prizewinner Sir John Vane, who discovered the lifesaving qualities of a daily dose of aspirin. Worcestershire-born Sir John, who has died aged 77, was one of the most outstanding scientists of the 20th Century. He shared the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1982 after he demystified one of medical science's conundrums: how aspirin works. The pharmacologist's discovery saves millions each year from heart...


Latest Fellows of the Royal Society Reference Libraries

Admiral Sir George Back
2014-01-07 10:58:04

Admiral Sir George Back FRS, born November 6th of 1796 and died on June 23rd of 1878, was a British naval officer, naturalist, artist, and explorer of the Canadian Arctic. He was born in Stockport. When he was a boy, he went to sea as a volunteer in the frigate HMS Arethusa in the year 1808 and participated in the destruction of batteries on the Spanish coast. In the following year he was involved in the fighting in the Bay of Biscay up until he was captured by the French. He remained a...

William Buckland
2013-10-14 14:04:00

William Buckland (March 12, 1784 – August 14, 1856) was an English theologian, ordained Anglican minister, geologist, and the prominent paleontologist of his day. He pioneered the use of fossilized feces, which he named “coprolites,” in the study and reconstruction of ancient ecosystems. Buckland is perhaps best known for naming and describing the very first recognized dinosaur fossil, the Megalosaurus, before the term “dinosaur” ever existed. Buckland was born at Axminster in...

Zoological Journal
2012-04-24 18:24:00

The Zoological Journal was a scientific journal published in the early nineteenth century on a quarterly basis. It was devoted entirely to zoology (animal kingdom). It was published in London by W. Philips. It featured “Original Communications, Translations of new and interesting Papers from Foreign sources and notices of new and remarkable facts in any way connected with Zoology," according to Gentlemen’s Magazine, 1823. The journal’s editors were Thomas Bell, John George Children,...

Iguanodon
2012-01-11 16:16:53

Iguanodon, meaning “Iguana tooth,” is a genus of ornithopod dinosaur known from the Kimmeridgian age of the Late Jurassic Period to the Cenomanian age of the Late Cretaceous Period. It lived in Asia, Europe and North America. Research in the early 2000s suggests however that only one species, I. bernissartensis, is well-substantiated, and lived during the Early Cretaceous Period in Europe. It was first discovered in 1822 and described three years later by English geologist Gideon...

26_7f396add43f7099cf1531543919f62b0
2013-03-16 00:00:00

Antonio de Ulloa was born on January 12, 1716 in Seville. Ulloa enlisted with the Spanish Navy in 1733. In 1735, he was sent to Ecuador as a member of the French Geodesic Mission. The mission, led by Pierre Bouguer, was organized by the French Academy of Sciences to measure a degree of the meridian at the equator. He stayed in Ecuador for 9 years until 1744, during this stint; he discovered platinum with his partner, Jorge Juan. In 1745, he returned to Spain. However, while enroute to...

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