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Latest Fellows of the Royal Society Stories

Historian Says Sir William Herschel May Not Be A 'Sir' At All
2013-04-05 15:48:24

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online A paper written by the historian Michael Hoskin and published in the Journal for the History of Astronomy claims Sir William Herschel may not be a "Sir" after all. Hoskin says that William and John Herschel were both made a knight of the Royal Hanoverian Guelphic Order, an event that typically leads to someone earning themselves the title of "Sir." However, the historian said they were in fact not given the "Sir" titles at all....

Darwin’s Private Letters Reveal A Deeply Sensitive Side
2013-03-27 09:56:41

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Charles Darwin is known primarily for his revolutionary theories on evolution and natural selection, but a series of soon-to-be-published letters show a personal, caring and emotional side of the iconic and controversial English naturalist. Some of the more intimate letters being released by Cambridge University´s Darwin Correspondence Project are a series of correspondences with his good friend and botanist Sir Joseph Hooker...

DNA Discoverer's Letter To Be Auctioned Off
2013-03-25 05:26:50

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A handwritten letter sent from one of the scientists responsible for discovering the structure of DNA will be auctioned off next month in New York City, according to various media reports. In the letter, which was written on March 19, 1953, British molecular biologist and biophysicist Francis Crick explains to his then-12-year-old son Michael how he and colleague James Watson were able to create a model for the genetic...

How To Celebrate Darwin Day 2013
2013-02-10 05:46:26

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online February 12, 2013 will be celebrated for many reasons around the world. In America it is President Abraham Lincoln's birthday. For Catholics around the world it is Mardi Gras or Carnival. But for every country on Earth, Feb. 12 is Darwin's Day — a celebration of science, humanity, and Charles Darwin's birthday. Charles Darwin, father of the theory of evolution and the author of "On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural...

Extinction Threat For Geniuses?
2013-02-04 04:22:29

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online There may never be another scientific genius on the level of Einstein, Newton, Darwin or Copernicus, one prominent US psychology professor claims in a recently published article. In that paper, which was published by the journal Nature, Dean Keith Simonton of the University of California-Davis (UC Davis) wrote that individuals who possess what he refers to as the ultimate level of scientific creativity could be an extinct species,...

StephenHawkingQuotes_011813
2013-01-18 14:45:24

Jedidiah Becker for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Over the years, the British cosmologist and theoretical physicist extraordinaire Stephen Hawking has become as well known for his ability to translate mind-boggling research about the universe into language that´s accessible to the layman as he is for his groundbreaking theoretical work in gravitational singularities and black hole radiation. This month, Cambridge´s wheelchair-bound conqueror of the cosmos turns 71....

2013-01-11 16:10:45

The RAS is pleased to announce the 2013 winners of its awards, medals and prizes. The President of the society, Prof. David Southwood, made the announcement at the Ordinary Meeting of the society held on Friday 11 January 2013. The winners will be invited to collect their awards at the annual RAS National Astronomy Meeting. Each year the RAS recognizes significant achievement in the fields of astronomy and geophysics through these awards. The Society's highest honor is its Gold Medal,...

Victorian-Era Map Helps Researchers Redraw Distribution Of Biodiversity
2012-12-21 13:36:25

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Ecologists have collected massive amounts of data over the past 130 years and a research team led by University of Copenhagen scientists has used that wealth of information to redraw a Victorian map used to illustrate the geographic distribution of animals. The original map by the renowned English naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace, with assistance from Charles Darwin, has been in use since it was drawn up in 1874, when it established...

Black Hole Research Nets Stephen Hawking $3 Million Prize
2012-12-11 08:41:39

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online One of the world´s most renowned physicists has likely got something bigger on his mind now than solving puzzles of the universe. Stephen Hawking, who has been shaking up the science world more than 25 years, has won a $3 million (£1.8m) Fundamental Physics Prize for his discovery in the 1970s that black holes emit radiation, for his work in quantum gravity and for his work in quantum aspects of the early universe. The...

Most Pressing Marine Science Questions Addressed
2012-12-10 13:45:17

National Oceanography Centre Southampton The most pressing issues that UK marine science needs to address over the next two decades are the subject of a prospectus published as a themed issue of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A last month. The volume is co-edited and carries contributions by scientists based at the National Oceanography Centre Southampton (NOCS). Human-induced changes in ocean processes are already being observed, and are projected to intensify as...


Latest Fellows of the Royal Society Reference Libraries

Admiral Sir George Back
2014-01-07 10:58:04

Admiral Sir George Back FRS, born November 6th of 1796 and died on June 23rd of 1878, was a British naval officer, naturalist, artist, and explorer of the Canadian Arctic. He was born in Stockport. When he was a boy, he went to sea as a volunteer in the frigate HMS Arethusa in the year 1808 and participated in the destruction of batteries on the Spanish coast. In the following year he was involved in the fighting in the Bay of Biscay up until he was captured by the French. He remained a...

William Buckland
2013-10-14 14:04:00

William Buckland (March 12, 1784 – August 14, 1856) was an English theologian, ordained Anglican minister, geologist, and the prominent paleontologist of his day. He pioneered the use of fossilized feces, which he named “coprolites,” in the study and reconstruction of ancient ecosystems. Buckland is perhaps best known for naming and describing the very first recognized dinosaur fossil, the Megalosaurus, before the term “dinosaur” ever existed. Buckland was born at Axminster in...

Zoological Journal
2012-04-24 18:24:00

The Zoological Journal was a scientific journal published in the early nineteenth century on a quarterly basis. It was devoted entirely to zoology (animal kingdom). It was published in London by W. Philips. It featured “Original Communications, Translations of new and interesting Papers from Foreign sources and notices of new and remarkable facts in any way connected with Zoology," according to Gentlemen’s Magazine, 1823. The journal’s editors were Thomas Bell, John George Children,...

Iguanodon
2012-01-11 16:16:53

Iguanodon, meaning “Iguana tooth,” is a genus of ornithopod dinosaur known from the Kimmeridgian age of the Late Jurassic Period to the Cenomanian age of the Late Cretaceous Period. It lived in Asia, Europe and North America. Research in the early 2000s suggests however that only one species, I. bernissartensis, is well-substantiated, and lived during the Early Cretaceous Period in Europe. It was first discovered in 1822 and described three years later by English geologist Gideon...

26_7f396add43f7099cf1531543919f62b0
2013-03-16 00:00:00

Antonio de Ulloa was born on January 12, 1716 in Seville. Ulloa enlisted with the Spanish Navy in 1733. In 1735, he was sent to Ecuador as a member of the French Geodesic Mission. The mission, led by Pierre Bouguer, was organized by the French Academy of Sciences to measure a degree of the meridian at the equator. He stayed in Ecuador for 9 years until 1744, during this stint; he discovered platinum with his partner, Jorge Juan. In 1745, he returned to Spain. However, while enroute to...

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Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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