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Latest Fellows of the Royal Society Stories

Hawking Unable To Attend 70th Birthday Celebration
2012-01-09 05:25:51

A special conference held to honor Stephen Hawking's 70th birthday went on without the guest of honor Sunday, as the professor and physicist was forced to cancel his appearance after being hospitalized for an unidentified infection last week. According to the Associated Press (AP), University of Cambridge Vice Chancellor Leszek Borysiewicz told those in attendance, "Unfortunately, his recovery has not been fast enough for him to be able to be here“¦ If you're listening...

Physics Luminary Hawking Searching For An Assistant
2011-12-29 14:31:11

One of the 21st century´s most brilliant public figures Stephen Hawking has recently placed an advertisement on his website for a personal assistant at a starting salary of around $40,000. The 69-year old professor at Cambridge University says he is not looking for a fellow physicist, just someone with technical savvy to help him with diverse tasks. Professor Hawking, whose work in theoretical physics, cosmology, and quantum gravity have established him as one of the century´s...

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2011-12-05 09:27:45

Medical records contained in a Seventeenth century book are set to go on display in a new exhibition celebrating 350 years of book collecting at the Royal Society. The medical records from John Graunt´s 1679 book, Natural and Political Observations “¦ Upon the Bills of Mortality, contain such information as people dying from lethargy, itch and fright. The book also reveals that more than 30,000 people in London died of consumption between 1647 and 1657. The bills of...

2011-05-27 08:00:00

LA JOLLA, Calif., May 27, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Royal Society announced today that Salk Institute molecular biologist Joanne Chory, Ph.D., an expert on how plants regulate their growth, has been named a foreign member of the Royal Society, the world's oldest scientific academy in continuous existence. She is being recognized as "a beacon of scientific excellence and relentless ambassador for plant research in the international community." "Joanne is a leader in the field of...

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2011-05-07 06:00:00

Doctors are putting modern medicine to the test to unravel the mystery of the long, painful illness and death of Charles Darwin, the father of evolution. Darwin's ailments were the subject of this year's annual Historical Clinicopathological Conference (CPC) in Baltimore on Friday.  The conference, sponsored by the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the Veterans Affairs (VA) Maryland Health Care System, is devoted to the modern medical diagnosis of disorders that affected...

2011-05-05 23:01:00

Doctors Investigate Long Illness and Death of Scientist Known as 'Father of Evolution' BALTIMORE, May 6, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Now, 200 years after the birth of Charles Darwin, the father of evolution, doctors are putting modern medicine to the test to unravel the mystery of the painful illness that plagued the scientist for much of his life. Darwin is the subject of this year's annual Historical Clinicopathological Conference (CPC) sponsored by the University of Maryland School...

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2011-04-08 07:05:00

A British astrophysicist and cosmologist known for his studies into the origins of the universe and its future was awarded one of the world's top religious awards this week for his work in exploring life's spiritual dimension. Martin Rees, 68, who is an expert on the extreme physics of black holes and the Big Bang, is the recipient of the $1.6 million 2011 Templeton Prize, announced by the John Templeton Foundation on Wednesday. Rees was chosen for the award because of the nature of his...

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2011-03-10 07:38:03

The prestigious Alan Mathison Turing Award was awarded to a Harvard University professor whose machine learning research helped to create an IBM computer that defeated two human competitors on a recent "Jeopardy!" tournament. Leslie Valiant, a computer science and applied mathematics professor, was honored for his "contributions to the development of computational learning theory and to the broader theory of computer science," the Association for Computing Machinery said on Wednesday. The...

2011-03-03 01:19:11

Protein folding and how it affects disease and drug discovery will be the focus of lectures hosted Thursday, March 3, by The Verna and Marrs McLean Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. Guest speakers will include Dr. David S. Eisenberg, director of the University of California at Los Angeles Department of Energy Institute for Genomics and Proteomics, and Sir Tom Blundell, Ph.D., director of research and professor emeritus in the department...


Latest Fellows of the Royal Society Reference Libraries

Admiral Sir George Back
2014-01-07 10:58:04

Admiral Sir George Back FRS, born November 6th of 1796 and died on June 23rd of 1878, was a British naval officer, naturalist, artist, and explorer of the Canadian Arctic. He was born in Stockport. When he was a boy, he went to sea as a volunteer in the frigate HMS Arethusa in the year 1808 and participated in the destruction of batteries on the Spanish coast. In the following year he was involved in the fighting in the Bay of Biscay up until he was captured by the French. He remained a...

William Buckland
2013-10-14 14:04:00

William Buckland (March 12, 1784 – August 14, 1856) was an English theologian, ordained Anglican minister, geologist, and the prominent paleontologist of his day. He pioneered the use of fossilized feces, which he named “coprolites,” in the study and reconstruction of ancient ecosystems. Buckland is perhaps best known for naming and describing the very first recognized dinosaur fossil, the Megalosaurus, before the term “dinosaur” ever existed. Buckland was born at Axminster in...

Zoological Journal
2012-04-24 18:24:00

The Zoological Journal was a scientific journal published in the early nineteenth century on a quarterly basis. It was devoted entirely to zoology (animal kingdom). It was published in London by W. Philips. It featured “Original Communications, Translations of new and interesting Papers from Foreign sources and notices of new and remarkable facts in any way connected with Zoology," according to Gentlemen’s Magazine, 1823. The journal’s editors were Thomas Bell, John George Children,...

Iguanodon
2012-01-11 16:16:53

Iguanodon, meaning “Iguana tooth,” is a genus of ornithopod dinosaur known from the Kimmeridgian age of the Late Jurassic Period to the Cenomanian age of the Late Cretaceous Period. It lived in Asia, Europe and North America. Research in the early 2000s suggests however that only one species, I. bernissartensis, is well-substantiated, and lived during the Early Cretaceous Period in Europe. It was first discovered in 1822 and described three years later by English geologist Gideon...

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2013-03-16 00:00:00

Antonio de Ulloa was born on January 12, 1716 in Seville. Ulloa enlisted with the Spanish Navy in 1733. In 1735, he was sent to Ecuador as a member of the French Geodesic Mission. The mission, led by Pierre Bouguer, was organized by the French Academy of Sciences to measure a degree of the meridian at the equator. He stayed in Ecuador for 9 years until 1744, during this stint; he discovered platinum with his partner, Jorge Juan. In 1745, he returned to Spain. However, while enroute to...

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Word of the Day
pungle
  • To take pains; labor assiduously with little progress.
This word comes from the Spanish 'pongale,' put it.
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