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Latest Fellows of the Royal Society Stories

2010-09-09 12:06:00

Leading Authority on Metaphysics to Respond to Hawking's Creation Theory IRVINE, Calif., Sept. 9 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- It's on! The Larry King stage is set for what may shape up to be one of the most provocative discussions on the need for a Creator in physics. Stephen Hawking's latest controversial work The Grand Design -- "no God required" -- has drawn vigorous retort from the religious community. One prominent philosopher and metaphysical expert, Robert Spitzer, S.J., Ph.D....

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2010-08-24 09:30:00

The amount of available living space--not competition, as Darwin believed--may have been the catalyst of evolution, according to a new study published in the August 23 edition of Biology Letters. As part of the study, researchers at the University of Bristol analyzed the fossils of birds, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians dating as far back as 400 million years ago. According to BBC News science reporter Howard Falcon-Lang, "the scientists showed that the amount of biodiversity closely...

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2010-07-29 13:54:43

Canadian archeologists have found the wreckage of the ship that has been credited with discovering the Northwest Passage. Marc-Andre Bernier of Parks Canada said on Wednesday that the archeologists snapped sonar images of HMS investigator not long after they arrived at the remote Mercy Bay site in the Northwest Territories. The HMS Investigator was the British ship that set out to search for two lost vessels and were part of Sir John Franklin's ill-fated 1845 Royal Navy expedition to...

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2010-07-12 12:46:13

A controversial new study, commissioned by the Royal Society of the United Kingdom, will analyze how population growth will impact sustainable development and the economy, according to a statement release by the organization on Monday. "The Royal Society has decided that it is time for a comprehensive review of the science, looking at the extent to which population will be a significant variable in rates of progress towards sustainable economic and social development over the next thirty...

2010-06-21 08:16:00

AMSTERDAM, June 21, 2010 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- - Professor William H. Miller of University of California, Berkeley, Rewarded for his Outstanding Contributions to the Theory of Chemical Reactions The Editors of the leading international journal Chemical Physics Letters are pleased to announce that the third Ahmed Zewail Prize in Molecular Sciences has been awarded to Professor William H. Miller from the University of California, Berkeley, USA, for his outstanding...

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2010-06-17 15:25:00

A professor of microbiology believes that humans will be wiped out in a few decades. Frank Fenner, professor at the Australian National University and the man who helped eradicate smallpox, told The Australian newspaper this week that "Homo sapiens will become extinct, perhaps within 100 years." "A lot of other animals will, too. It's an irreversible situation. I think it's too late. I try not to express that because people are trying to do something, but they keep putting it off." Fenner...

2010-06-16 06:45:00

GROSSE POINTE, Mich., June 16 /PRNewswire/ -- Creative Evolution Revisited (published by iUniverse) by Donald Austin offers a new way of thinking about evolution by combining various elements from differing philosophies. In the late 1800's, there were two competing theories regarding evolution: Natural Theology held by William Paley, and Darwin's theory of evolution. At this same time in history, a famous French philosopher named Henri Bergson offered a third option that has come to be...

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2010-05-03 11:31:00

New research suggests that Charles Darwin's family was a living human example of a theory that he developed about plants: that inbreeding could negatively affect the health and number of resulting offspring. Darwin was married to his first cousin, Emma Wedgwood. They had 10 children, but three died before age 10, two from infectious diseases. And three of the six surviving children with long-term marriages did not produce any offspring "“ a "suspicious" sign, researchers say, that these...

2010-04-27 08:23:16

Leading Australian researchers will next week be honored for their work in fields ranging from cancer prevention and how sex shapes us, to the revelation of past climates, the secrets of coral reefs and the future of our oil and gas industry. The Australian Academy of Science will present its highest awards over two days, 5th and 6th May, at the Academy's Shine Dome in Canberra, to three eminent scientists for their career contributions to their fields, and five awards to outstanding...

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2010-02-23 08:50:15

Scaling and shear link morphology, genotype and developmental genetics From how massive humpbacks glide through the sea with ease to the efficient way fungal spores fly, applied mathematicians at Harvard have excavated the equations behind a variety of complex phenomena. The latest numerical feat by Otger Campàs and Michael Brenner, working closely with a team of Harvard evolutionary biologists led by Arhat Abzhanov, zeroes in on perhaps the most famous icon of evolution:...


Latest Fellows of the Royal Society Reference Libraries

Admiral Sir George Back
2014-01-07 10:58:04

Admiral Sir George Back FRS, born November 6th of 1796 and died on June 23rd of 1878, was a British naval officer, naturalist, artist, and explorer of the Canadian Arctic. He was born in Stockport. When he was a boy, he went to sea as a volunteer in the frigate HMS Arethusa in the year 1808 and participated in the destruction of batteries on the Spanish coast. In the following year he was involved in the fighting in the Bay of Biscay up until he was captured by the French. He remained a...

William Buckland
2013-10-14 14:04:00

William Buckland (March 12, 1784 – August 14, 1856) was an English theologian, ordained Anglican minister, geologist, and the prominent paleontologist of his day. He pioneered the use of fossilized feces, which he named “coprolites,” in the study and reconstruction of ancient ecosystems. Buckland is perhaps best known for naming and describing the very first recognized dinosaur fossil, the Megalosaurus, before the term “dinosaur” ever existed. Buckland was born at Axminster in...

Zoological Journal
2012-04-24 18:24:00

The Zoological Journal was a scientific journal published in the early nineteenth century on a quarterly basis. It was devoted entirely to zoology (animal kingdom). It was published in London by W. Philips. It featured “Original Communications, Translations of new and interesting Papers from Foreign sources and notices of new and remarkable facts in any way connected with Zoology," according to Gentlemen’s Magazine, 1823. The journal’s editors were Thomas Bell, John George Children,...

Iguanodon
2012-01-11 16:16:53

Iguanodon, meaning “Iguana tooth,” is a genus of ornithopod dinosaur known from the Kimmeridgian age of the Late Jurassic Period to the Cenomanian age of the Late Cretaceous Period. It lived in Asia, Europe and North America. Research in the early 2000s suggests however that only one species, I. bernissartensis, is well-substantiated, and lived during the Early Cretaceous Period in Europe. It was first discovered in 1822 and described three years later by English geologist Gideon...

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2013-03-16 00:00:00

Antonio de Ulloa was born on January 12, 1716 in Seville. Ulloa enlisted with the Spanish Navy in 1733. In 1735, he was sent to Ecuador as a member of the French Geodesic Mission. The mission, led by Pierre Bouguer, was organized by the French Academy of Sciences to measure a degree of the meridian at the equator. He stayed in Ecuador for 9 years until 1744, during this stint; he discovered platinum with his partner, Jorge Juan. In 1745, he returned to Spain. However, while enroute to...

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Word of the Day
cruet
  • A vial or small glass bottle, especially one for holding vinegar, oil, etc.; a caster for liquids.
This word is Middle English in origin, and ultimately comes from the Old French, diminutive of 'crue,' flask.
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