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Latest Fermentation Stories

2012-08-28 12:29:06

Antibiotic residues in uncured pepperoni or salami meat are potent enough to weaken helpful bacteria that processors add to acidify the sausage to make it safe for consumption, according to a study to be published in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, on August 28. Sausage manufacturers commonly inoculate sausage meat with lactic-acid-producing bacteria in an effort to control the fermentation process so that the final product is acidic...

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2012-08-13 09:40:53

John Neumann for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Forget the image of a bewhiskered and lederhosen -wearing biermeister stirring golden vats of ale over a fire, the future of beer drinking is in the hands of rubber-gloved hands and face-mask protected flavor technicians and biochemists. Buried in the corridors of Cara Technology´s research labs in southern England, is a lab containing hundreds of beer yeast strains, some dating back 130 years. All are cryogenicly frozen in tiny...

2012-07-11 05:40:34

A new biofuel production process created by Michigan State University researchers produces energy more than 20 times higher than existing methods. The results, published in the current issue of Environmental Science and Technology, showcase a novel way to use microbes to produce biofuel and hydrogen, all while consuming agricultural wastes. Gemma Reguera, MSU microbiologist, has developed bioelectrochemical systems known as microbial electrolysis cells, or MECs, using bacteria to...

2012-05-29 08:05:50

Single cell oils (SCO), produced by and extracted from some single-celled microorganisms, are featured with high levels of the major very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). SCO are essential for health and potential sources of bio-diesel. There has been a long history of interest in the exploitation of microorganisms as oil and fat providers, due to the continuing diminution of arable land and climate change making animal and plant sourced oils even more limited. However, such...

Scientists Use New Method To Study Judo
2012-03-21 06:23:49

Brazilian scientists are taking note of the rise in popularity of mixed martial arts and want to quantify the amount of energy being used during these activities. By using tools and technologies such as electromagnetic blood tests and portable gas analyzers, these scientists will be able to quantify how much energy is used during other activities, such as team sports. Watching a Judo match makes it clear why scientists would want to base their study on this sport. The two fighters will...

2012-03-09 00:02:59

Whether or not a wine turns out to be as outstanding as the winemaker hopes depends on the quality of the yeasts; they control the fermentation process and create the distinctive flavor. A new sensor allows winemakers to establish whether the grape must contains the right sort of microorganisms before fermentation has even begun. A good wine is unmistakable. It has its own particular taste, its own characteristic and singular aroma. None of this happens by accident: the production of...

Promiscuous Yeast Hook Up In Wine-making Vats
2012-02-27 06:07:40

Humans aren't the only species that like to get busy with a glass of bubbly, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Turns out, the common baker's yeast has indulged in a frenzy of amorous frolicking in the fermentation vats of winemakers for hundreds, possibly thousands, of years, with interesting results. The unexpected promiscuity has made the lineage of many commercial and wild yeast strains difficult to trace. But there are also indications that such...

Toasting The Chemistry Of Champagne
2011-12-29 09:22:37

[ Watch the Video ] Just in time for those New Year's Eve toasts, which might include a farewell to the International Year of Chemistry, the world's largest scientific society today posted online a video on the chemistry of champagne. It explains that champagne, unlike other wines, undergoes a second fermentation in the bottle to trap carbon dioxide gas, which dissolves into the wine and forms the fabled bubbles in the bubbly. More than 600 different chemical compounds join carbon...

Image 1 - Waiter! There's A Fly In My Beer!
2011-11-18 04:34:10

UC Riverside entomologists explain why flies are attracted to beer and products of yeast fermentation Ever wondered why flies are attracted to beer? Entomologists at the University of California, Riverside have, and offer an explanation. They report that flies sense glycerol, a sweet-tasting compound that yeasts make during fermentation. "Insects use their taste system to glean important information about the quality and nutritive value of food sources," said Anupama Dahanukar, an...


Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
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