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Latest Fern Stories

2012-04-19 23:00:50

Costa Farms O2 For You, Houseplants with a Purpose, lets you bring home earth´s natural air purifiers for health and well being on Earth Day Miami, Florida (PRWEB) April 19, 2012 Thank a plant on Earth Day. Silently and always “working”, these green heroes toil tirelessly to purify the environment, naturally cleansing the air and providing truly amazing health benefits! They filter indoor air 24/7 to sweep it clean from dangerous chemicals and toxins while continuously...

2011-10-12 07:00:00

A biotechnical company called Biomar Microbial Technologies, has recently announced its strategy to achieve an annual growth superior to 20%, from 2011 to 2014, based on the intensive internationalization and diversification policy of its Business Units in various business sectors. In like manner, Biomar has just made public the positive results it has obtained from the research carried out on some of their marine compounds to treat Glioblastoma, the most aggressive type of cancer, as well as...

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2011-07-19 11:07:09

Recent botanical exploration efforts in the rugged Marquesas Islands (French Polynesia) have increased the known flora of the archipelago by an impressive 20%. Field research and collecting in conjunction with the Vascular Flora of the Marquesas Islands and Flore de la Polynesie française projects have yielded 62 new species of ferns and flowering plants bringing the total native species to 360, of which 18 are newly described and illustrated in a special issue of...

2011-06-24 12:51:39

Japanese royal fern tops list for formaldehyde removal effectiveness Formaldehyde is a major contaminant of indoor air, originating from particle board, carpet, window coverings, paper products, tobacco smoke, and other sources. Indoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as formaldehyde can contribute to allergies, asthma, headaches, and a condition known as ''sick building syndrome". The concern is widespread; a 2002 report from the World Health Organization estimated that undesirable...

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2010-07-11 08:20:09

Redwood forest ecosystem of northern California depends on fog to stay hydrated during rainless summers As the mercury rises outdoors, it's a fitting time to consider the effects of summertime droughts and global warming on ecosystems. Complex interactions among temperature, water cycling, and plant communities create a tangled web of questions that need to be answered as we face a rapidly changing climate. Drs. Emily Limm and Todd Dawson (University of California, Berkeley) recently tackled...

2010-06-11 13:21:04

Isolating a gene that allows a type of fern to tolerate high levels of arsenic, Purdue University researchers hope to use the finding to create plants that can clean up soils and waters contaminated by the toxic metal. The fern Pteris vittata can tolerate 100 to 1,000 times more arsenic than other plants. Jody Banks, a professor of botany and plant pathology, and David Salt, a professor of horticulture, uncovered what may have been an evolutionary genetic event that creates an arsenic pump of...

2010-06-09 14:17:11

Insights into arsenic transport and tolerance Arsenic is toxic to most forms of life, and occurs naturally in soil and ground water in many regions of the world. Chronic exposure to arsenic has been linked to lung, bladder and kidney cancer, and thus there are strict limits on allowable levels or arsenic in drinking water. Chemically similar to phosphorus, arsenic forms arsenate (AsO43-), which closely resembles phosphate (PO43-). Arsenate interferes with many phosphate-requiring metabolic...

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2010-05-05 11:34:18

DNA testing of garden ferns sold at plant nurseries in North Carolina, Texas, and California has found that plants marketed as American natives may actually be exotic species from other parts of the globe. The finding relied on a new technique called "DNA barcoding" that uses small snippets of DNA to distinguish between species, in much the same way that a supermarket scanner uses the black lines in a barcode to identify cans of soup or boxes of cereal. A team of North Carolina researchers...

2010-05-04 15:00:50

Materials based on water ferns could reduce fuel consumption massively The hairs on the surface of water ferns could allow ships to have a 10 per cent decrease in fuel consumption. The plant has the rare ability to put on a gauzy skirt of air under water. Researchers at the University of Bonn, Rostock and Karlsruhe now show in the journal Advanced Materials (doi: 10.1002/adma.200904411) how the fern does this. Their results can possibly be used for the construction of new kinds of hulls with...

2010-04-01 13:24:10

Dehydrin proteins are found to be a possible key to desiccation-tolerant plants such as the resurrection fern Drought can take a serious toll on plants and animals alike. When cells are deprived of water, they shrink, collapsing in upon themselves and, without water as a medium, chemicals and enzymes inside the cells may malfunction. However, some plants, like the aptly named "resurrection fern" (Polypodium polypodioides), can survive extreme measures of water loss, even as much as 95% of...


Latest Fern Reference Libraries

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2008-06-15 19:42:59

The Black Tree Fern (Cyathea medullaris), is a species of evergreen tree fern endemic to New Zealand. New Zealand forest is evergreen due to the mild climate. Groups of lightly interspersed black tree ferns are common sights and very prominent on the rather steep but overgrown slopes of the North Island volcanic landscape. This fern is found to grow to heights of 65 feet, making it the largest tree fern. It may have been named because the stalk of each mature frond is black with a rather...

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2008-06-15 19:41:38

The Hawaiian Tree Fern or Male Tree Fern (Cibotium menziesii), is a species of tree fern, of the genus Cibotium which is endemic to the islands of Hawaii, and is found on all the windward Hawaiian islands. The habitat of this species is damp forest areas, usually at elevations varying between 1,000 and 6,000 feet. They can grown on the ground or epiphytically, growing on trees. It is also very adaptable and can withstand cool winter temperatures. These ferns can grow up to 35 feet tall but...

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2008-06-15 19:39:07

Giant Salvinia (Salvinia molesta), also known as kariba weed after it infested a large portion of the reservoir of the same name, is an aquatic fern, native to south-eastern Brazil. It is a free floating plant that does not attach to the soil, but instead remains buoyant on the surface of a body of water. The fronds are .25 to 1.5 inches long and broad, with a bristly surface, and produced in pairs also with a third modified root-like frond that hangs in the water. This is an example of an...

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2008-06-15 19:37:30

The Royal Fern (Osmunda regalis), is a species of Osmunda, native to Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas, growing in woodland bogs. The species is sometimes known as flowering fern due to the appearance of its fertile fronds. The name derives from its being one of the largest and most imposing European ferns. In many areas, it has become rare as a result of wetland drainage for agriculture. It is a deciduous herbaceous plant which produces separate fertile and sterile fronds. The...

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2008-06-15 19:35:52

The Interrupted Fern (Osmunda claytoniana), is a fern native to eastern North America and eastern Asia. In eastern North America it occurs from southern Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec (up to the tree line), east to Newfoundland and south through the Appalachian mountains down to Georgia and west to the Mississippi River. In Asia, it is found in the Himalaya, southern China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan. It is found in humid zones, mostly in forests, but also in more open biomes, although rarely in...

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Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.