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Latest Ferroelectricity Stories

2010-09-28 20:41:26

The second law of thermodynamics is a big hit with the beret-wearing college crowd because of its implicit existential crunch. The tendency of a closed systems to become increasingly disordered if no energy is added or removed is a popular, if not depressing, "things fall apart" sort-of-law that would seem to confirm the adolescent experience. Now a joint team of Ukrainian and American scientists has demanded more work and less poetry from the second law of thermodynamics, proposing a novel...

2010-08-25 14:19:37

Chinese scientists have shown that magnetic memory, logic and sensor cells can be made faster and more energy efficient by using an electric, not magnetic, field to flip the magnetization of the sensing layer only about halfway, rather than completely to the opposite direction. They describe the new cell design in the Journal of Applied Physics, which is published by the American Institute of Physics (AIP). Magnetic random access memory (or MRAM) cells have long been investigated as possible...

2010-08-18 02:40:19

Scientists at Tohoku University in Japan have recorded data at a density of 4 trillion bits per square inch, which is a world record for the experimental "ferroelectric" data storage method. As described the journal Applied Physics Letters, which is published by the American Institute of Physics, this density is about eight times the density of today's most advanced magnetic hard-disk drives. The data-recording device scans a tiny cantilever tip that rides in contact with the surface of a...

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2010-03-31 10:09:36

A newly discovered path for the conversion of sunlight to electricity could brighten the future for photovoltaic technology. Researchers with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have found a new mechanism by which the photovoltaic effect can take place in semiconductor thin-films. This new route to energy production overcomes the bandgap voltage limitation that continues to plague conventional solid-state solar cells. Working with bismuth ferrite, a ceramic made from bismuth,...

2010-02-13 08:23:46

Two of The Florida State University's most accomplished scientists recently joined forces on a collaborative research project that has yielded groundbreaking results involving an unusual family of crystalline minerals. Their findings could lay the groundwork for future researchers seeking to develop a new generation of computer chips and other information-storage devices that can hold vast amounts of data and be strongly encrypted for security purposes. Working with a team of researchers from...

2009-09-03 11:40:00

NEW YORK, Sept. 3 /PRNewswire/ -- Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue. Displays: Global Markets and Evolving Technologies http://www.reportlinker.com/p0120334/Displays-Global-Markets-and-Evolving-Technologies.html This Report: Provides an overview of the global market for displays, with market forecasts through 2014 Focuses on key types of electronic displays including CRT, flat panels, LCD, plasma, light emitting diodes, organic...

2009-06-22 14:04:17

U.S. government scientists say they have created a method of measuring the intrinsic conducting properties of ferroelectric materials. The researchers at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences at the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee say their achievement could lead to much smaller, faster and more powerful electronic devices. For years, the challenge has been to develop a nanoscale material that can act as a switch to store binary information, Peter...

2009-06-18 07:33:46

Electronic devices of the future could be smaller, faster, more powerful and consume less energy because of a discovery by researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory.The key to the finding, published in Science, involves a method to measure intrinsic conducting properties of ferroelectric materials, which for decades have held tremendous promise but have eluded experimental proof. Now, however, ORNL Wigner Fellow Peter Maksymovych and co-authors Stephen Jesse, Art...

2009-05-14 11:11:03

U.S. researchers say they have developed a technique using a silicon crystal as a type of nanoscale vice to squeeze another crystal into a more useful shape. The scientists led by Professor Darrell Schlom of Cornell University and Joseph Woicik of the National Institute of Standards and Technology said their accomplishment might lead to development of a new class of electronic devices that remember their last state even after power is turned off. Computers that could switch on instantly...

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2009-05-09 08:18:14

A clever materials science technique that uses a silicon crystal as a sort of nanoscale vise to squeeze another crystal into a more useful shape may launch a new class of electronic devices that remember their last state even after power is turned off. Computers that could switch on instantly without the time-consuming process of "booting" an operating system is just one of the possibilities, according to a new paper by a team of researchers spanning four universities, two federal...