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Latest Ferromagnetism Stories

2012-02-20 20:24:17

Dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS) have recently been a major focus of magnetic semiconductor research. A laboratory from the University of Science and Technology of China explored the feasibility of doping manganese (Mn) into zinc sulfide (ZnS) to obtain magnetic semiconductors. Hideo Ohno and his group at the Tohoku University, Japan, were the first to measure ferromagnetism in transition metal-doped semiconductors such as indium arsenide and gallium arsenide doped with Mn. Ever since,...

2011-11-29 11:21:36

Dr. Ariando of the National University of Singapore discovered a collective electronic state not seen before in the bulk of either 2 individual insulating oxides, thus demonstrating that electrons at their interface can now exhibit ferromagnetism In many ionic materials, including the oxides, surfaces created along specific directions can become electrically charged. By the same token, such electronic charging, or 'polarization', can also occur at the interface of two connecting materials....

2011-11-22 12:25:16

A magnetic force microscope (MFM) can determine the distribution of stray fields at a level of tens of nanometers near the surface of magnetic films, and therefore is an effective tool for observing the domain structures in magnetic grains of submicrometer size. At present, the coercivity of normal MFM cantilevers is about 0.3 kOe. Being affected by the magnetism of the measured material, the stability of these cantilevers is unsatisfactory. By applying a FePt layer, the coercivity can reach...

New Materials Turn Heat Into Electricity
2011-11-05 04:16:03

A new material with a low-temperature nonmagnetic phase and a strongly magnetic high-temperature phase could potentially be used to help generate power Most of today's power plants--from some of the largest solar arrays to nuclear energy facilities--rely on the boiling and condensing of water to produce energy. The process of turning heated water into energy was essentially understood by James Watt all the way back in 1765. Heat from the sun or from a controlled nuclear reaction boils...

2011-09-27 17:35:05

Innovative process allows creation of stable ferromagnetic materials at room temperature in fewer steps than before Scientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst report that for the first time they have designed a much simpler method of preparing ordered magnetic materials than ever before, by coupling magnetic properties to nanostructure formation at low temperatures. The innovative process allows them to create room-temperature ferromagnetic materials that are stable for long...

2011-09-12 13:14:05

Rotating magnetic moments: Applied Physics Letters reports Bochum's physicists led by Prof. Dr. Hartmut Zabel have demonstrated the spin pumping effect in magnetic layers for the first time experimentally. The behavior of the spin pumping had previously only been predicted theoretically. The research team at the RUB has now succeeded in measuring the effect using ultrafast X-ray scattering with picosecond resolution. Through their rotation of the magnetic moments, the so-called magnetic...

Neutron Analysis Reveals Unique Atom-scale Behavior Of 'Cobalt Blue'
2011-09-07 05:55:07

  Neutron scattering studies of "cobalt blue," a compound prized by artists for its lustrous blue hue, are revealing unique magnetic characteristics that could answer questions about mysterious properties in other materials. Experiments at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), both located at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, indicate novel behaviors in the antiferromagnetic material cobalt aluminum oxide, -- CoAl2O4, or...

2011-08-23 17:40:35

Nature Materials: new multiferroic material developed An international team of researchers from France and Germany has developed a new material which is the first to react magnetically to electrical fields at room temperature. Previously this was only at all possible at extremely low and unpractical temperatures. Electric fields are technically much easier and cheaper to produce than magnetic fields for which you need power guzzling coils. The researchers have now found a way to control...

foto_zu_multiferroik
2011-08-22 20:10:59

HZB scientists observe how a material at room temperature exhibits a unique property — a 'multiferroic' material with potential uses for cheap and quick data storage. Researchers at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) in close collaboration with colleagues in France and UK, have engineered a material that exhibits a rare and versatile trait in magnetism at room temperature. It´s called a “multiferroic,” and it means that the material has properties allowing it to be both...

2011-08-01 14:36:30

Computer files that allow us to watch videos, store pictures, and edit all kinds of media formats are nothing else but streams of "0" and "1" digital data, that is, bits and bytes. Modern computing technology is based on our ability to write, store, and retrieve digital information as efficiently as possible. In a computer hard disk, this is achieved in practice by writing information on a thin magnetic layer, where magnetic domains pointing "up" represent a "1" and magnetic domains pointing...


Latest Ferromagnetism Reference Libraries

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2010-09-23 20:39:09

An electromagnet, a magnet whose magnetic field is produced by the flow of electric current, works until the electric current ceases. The magnetic field in a simple electromagnet is created by a wire passing through it with an electric current. The strength of the magnet depends on the amount of current. By making the wire into a coil the magnetic field is concentrated. A straight tube coil is a solenoid. A stronger magnetic field can be produced by putting a ferromagnetic material, such as...

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Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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