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Latest Fertility and intelligence Stories

Economic Factors Have Greatest Impact On Fertility Rates
2013-05-01 08:56:09

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Economic factors, rather than medical or cultural influences, will have the greatest impact on global population levels over the next decade, according to a recent University of Missouri College of Arts and Science (COAS) study. According to United Nations figures, the Earth´s population could exceed 8 billion people by the year 2023 if current trends continue. But improvements in economic development, such as higher...

2012-10-03 10:35:37

Children in smaller families are only slightly more likely to survive childhood in high mortality environments, according to a new study of mothers and children in sub-Saharan Africa seeking to understand why women, even in the highest fertility populations in world, rarely give birth to more than eight children. The study by Dr David Lawson and Dr Alex Alvergne from UCL Anthropology, and Dr Mhairi Gibson from the University of Bristol, challenges the popular theory proposed by...

2012-05-01 21:26:28

A national study suggests that a significantly greater number of highly educated women in their late 30s and 40s are deciding to have children - a dramatic turnaround from recent history. Among college-educated women, childlessness peaked in the late 1990s, when about 30 percent had no children, according to the new analysis of U.S. data. But childlessness declined about 5 percentage points between 1998 and 2008. “We may be seeing the beginning of a new trend,” said Bruce...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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