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Latest Fertility preservation Stories

2006-02-20 10:30:00

NEW YORK -- Sperm banking is possible for most teens with cancer who must undergo fertility-impairing treatment, British researchers report. Several types of chemotherapy can damage the sperm-producing portion of the testes, while radiation of the testicular area can also lead to infertility, For this reason, infertility is very common among male survivors of childhood cancer. Freezing sperm obtained by masturbation is the most widely available method for fertility preservation, and patients...

2005-12-30 15:00:00

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The damage to "ovarian reserve" is quantitative rather than qualitative when ovarian cysts are excised using minimally invasive laparoscopy, Italian researchers report. Importantly, they say, this approach has a good chance of preserving a woman's fertility. An ovarian endometrioma is a cyst that is attached to the ovaries and that often contains ovarian tissue. Dr. Guido Ragni and colleagues from Universita Degli Studi di Milano studied 38 women who had previously...

2005-08-25 11:46:11

By Amy Norton NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Sperm banking may not only preserve young cancer patients' ability to have children, but their emotional well-being as well, according to Japanese researchers. They found that among 51 young men who banked their sperm before undergoing chemotherapy, 80 percent said that the move helped them in the "emotional battle against cancer." Even those who were unsure whether they wanted to have children in the future gained some peace of mind from...

2005-08-19 15:03:02

A quarter of young breast cancer sufferers have reported no discussion of fertility issues at the time of diagnosis, despite the possibility of infertility after treatment, according to new research led by the University of New South Wales (UNSW). "Timing is everything," said Belinda Thewes, a UNSW PhD candidate in the Faculty of Medicine. "These women need more information when they are diagnosed about the effect that treatment could have on their fertility, so they can take appropriate...

2005-07-19 13:03:41

By Patricia Reaney LONDON (Reuters) - Most testicular cancer patients who try to father children after completing their treatment succeed, scientists said Tuesday. Men who have surgery to remove the tumour have the least problems but even patients who have radiotherapy and chemotherapy are able to have children. "The vast majority of men, after testicular cancer treatment, can go on and have a family as normal," said Dr Robert Huddart of The Institute of Cancer Research in London. But he...

2005-06-30 15:05:37

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Women with a history of fertility problems appear to run the risk of developing certain cancers, new research indicates. In a look-back study, Dr. Louise A. Brinton, of the National Cancer Institute in Rockville, Maryland, compared the risk of cancer among 12,193 U.S. women treated for infertility between 1965 and 1988 with that of the general population. Over an average period of nearly 19 years, the infertility patients had a 23 percent higher likelihood of...

2005-06-28 11:47:01

By Megan Goldin JERUSALEM (Reuters) - An Israeli woman who became infertilefrom cancer treatment has given birth to a healthy baby girlafter an ovarian tissue transplant, the first clear example ofthe procedure's success, doctors said on Tuesday. The Israeli, who suffered from non-Hodgkins lymphoma,became completely infertile in her late 20s due to chemotherapyand a bone marrow transplant to treat her disease. She gave birth on Monday at Israel's Sheba Medical Centernear Tel Aviv. "Her...

2005-06-22 12:20:00

The largest study to date on women with borderline ovarian tumours shows that fertility can be preserved if conservative surgery is used, a scientist said at the 21st annual conference of the European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology. Dr. Christophe Poncelet, from the UFR SMBH L©onard de Vinci, Universit© Paris XIII, Bobigny, France, said that the research mean that women could choose to preserve their fertility by having only one ovary removed. Borderline tumours make...

2005-06-16 19:51:26

While more than 70% of patients survive childhood leukemia, curative chemotherapy can often irreversibly impair the formation of spermatozoa, causing infertility in males. Currently, the only established clinical option for the preservation of fertility in leukemia patients is to bank sperm before treatment commences. However, as mature germ cells do not develop until the onset of puberty, children are unable to later benefit from such assisted reproductive techniques. Although the...

2005-05-29 23:15:00

ANN ARBOR, Mich. - A new technique might allow women diagnosed with cancer the opportunity to have children when chemotherapy and radiation treatments rob them of their fertility, researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have found. By having her eggs frozen before she begins cancer treatments, a woman can preserve the hope of one day having a baby. Freezing eggs is one thing; thawing them safely so they can lead to pregnancy is the challenge. In the past,...


Word of the Day
holluschickie
  • A 'bachelor seal'; a young male seal which is prevented from mating by its herd's older males (mated bulls defending their territory).
This comes from the Russian word for 'bachelors.'
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