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Latest Fertility preservation Stories

2007-04-16 09:00:42

The Fertility Centers of Illinois (FCI) will host the third annual Midwest Reproductive Symposium where physicians, nurses, allied health professionals, and scientists will meet to discuss new concepts, techniques and challenges in the field of reproductive medicine. This forum will collectively bring together medical experts to help advance the field of assisted reproductive technology. The Midwest Reproductive Symposium (MRS) is an educational event that began in 2005 to promote the...

2006-08-15 14:11:26

By Megan Rauscher NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A study of women with ovarian cancer undergoing chemotherapy shows that those with a more optimistic outlook were less distressed and had a better quality of life. The study team also found that higher levels of optimism at the start of treatment were associated with greater declines in cancer antigen 125 (CA 125) levels during treatment. Declines in CA 125 have been used to predict the likelihood of remission and survival in ovarian...

2006-07-25 00:30:00

NEW YORK -- In vitro fertilization (IVF), a popular type of test tube fertility technique, is less likely be successful in the mother's eggs have been frozen and stored, researchers report in the journal Fertility and Sterility. With IVF, the egg is fertilized by the sperm outside the body and the resulting embryo is placed in the mother. The egg may be relatively fresh or it may have been obtained in the past and frozen until ready for use. This latter approach allows women with certain...

2006-06-19 07:46:21

By Patricia Reaney PRAGUE (Reuters) - A new method of freezing human eggs could enable many more women, particularly young cancer patients, to have children, Japanese fertility experts said on Monday. Unlike sperm which can be easily frozen, thawed and used in fertility treatments, women's eggs are very fragile and are often damaged when they are thawed. Only about 150 babies worldwide, including three in Britain, have been born from eggs that have been frozen and thawed. But...

2006-02-20 10:30:00

NEW YORK -- Sperm banking is possible for most teens with cancer who must undergo fertility-impairing treatment, British researchers report. Several types of chemotherapy can damage the sperm-producing portion of the testes, while radiation of the testicular area can also lead to infertility, For this reason, infertility is very common among male survivors of childhood cancer. Freezing sperm obtained by masturbation is the most widely available method for fertility preservation, and patients...

2005-12-30 15:00:00

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The damage to "ovarian reserve" is quantitative rather than qualitative when ovarian cysts are excised using minimally invasive laparoscopy, Italian researchers report. Importantly, they say, this approach has a good chance of preserving a woman's fertility. An ovarian endometrioma is a cyst that is attached to the ovaries and that often contains ovarian tissue. Dr. Guido Ragni and colleagues from Universita Degli Studi di Milano studied 38 women who had previously...

2005-08-25 11:46:11

By Amy Norton NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Sperm banking may not only preserve young cancer patients' ability to have children, but their emotional well-being as well, according to Japanese researchers. They found that among 51 young men who banked their sperm before undergoing chemotherapy, 80 percent said that the move helped them in the "emotional battle against cancer." Even those who were unsure whether they wanted to have children in the future gained some peace of mind from...

2005-08-19 15:03:02

A quarter of young breast cancer sufferers have reported no discussion of fertility issues at the time of diagnosis, despite the possibility of infertility after treatment, according to new research led by the University of New South Wales (UNSW). "Timing is everything," said Belinda Thewes, a UNSW PhD candidate in the Faculty of Medicine. "These women need more information when they are diagnosed about the effect that treatment could have on their fertility, so they can take appropriate...

2005-07-19 13:03:41

By Patricia Reaney LONDON (Reuters) - Most testicular cancer patients who try to father children after completing their treatment succeed, scientists said Tuesday. Men who have surgery to remove the tumour have the least problems but even patients who have radiotherapy and chemotherapy are able to have children. "The vast majority of men, after testicular cancer treatment, can go on and have a family as normal," said Dr Robert Huddart of The Institute of Cancer Research in London. But he...

2005-06-30 15:05:37

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Women with a history of fertility problems appear to run the risk of developing certain cancers, new research indicates. In a look-back study, Dr. Louise A. Brinton, of the National Cancer Institute in Rockville, Maryland, compared the risk of cancer among 12,193 U.S. women treated for infertility between 1965 and 1988 with that of the general population. Over an average period of nearly 19 years, the infertility patients had a 23 percent higher likelihood of...


Word of the Day
cenobite
  • One of a religious order living in a convent or in community; a monk: opposed to anchoret or hermit (one who lives in solitude).
  • A social bee.
This word comes from the Latin 'coenobium,' convent, which comes from the Greek 'koinobios,' living in community.
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