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Latest Fetal bovine serum Stories

2014-07-21 08:29:00

LONDON, July 21, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Reportbuyer.com has added a new market research report: Cell Culture Market by Equipment (Bioreactor, Incubator, Centrifuge), by Reagent (Media, Sera, Growth Factors, Serum Free Media), by Application (Cancer Research, Gene Therapy, Drug Development, Vaccine Production, Toxicity Testing) - Global Forecast to...

2014-07-16 12:27:46

EWING, N.J., July 16, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Essential Pharmaceuticals LLC, Ewing NJ announces the release of Cell-Ess® serum replacement for cell culture. Cell-Ess is a replacement for the Fetal Bovine Serum (FBS) that is commonly used in cell culture. The product is chemically defined, animal component free and delivers critical components that are needed for cell growth. http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnvar/20140715/127335 Cell-Ess enables researchers to eliminate FBS use in...

2011-06-29 12:06:20

Mensenchymal stem cells (MSCs), multipotent cells identified in bone marrow and other tissues, have been shown to be therapeutically effective in the immunosuppression of T-cells, the regeneration of blood vessels, assisting in skin wound healing, and suppressing chronic airway inflammation in some asthma cases. Typically, when MSCs are being prepared for therapeutic applications, they are cultured in fetal bovine serum. A study conducted by a research team from Singapore and published in the...

2009-11-25 06:45:00

NEW YORK, Nov. 25 /PRNewswire/ -- Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue: Cell/Tissue Culture Supplies - A Global Market Perspective http://www.reportlinker.com/p0164378/Cell/Tissue-Culture-Supplies---A-Global-Market-Perspective.html Cell culture is of vital importance in the life sciences industry for both research and industrial use. On the research front, cell cultures find extensive application in toxicology studies for...


Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'