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Latest Fetus Stories

2009-04-16 14:11:17

Immigrant women are less likely to use folic acid supplements before pregnancy to prevent spina bifida, particularly those who recently immigrated to the country, according to a new study led by a St. Michael's Hospital physician in collaboration with Statistics Canada, Health Canada and the University of Toronto. The study is the first to provide national estimates of pre-pregnancy folic acid use in Canada. "Our study's findings report that while about six in 10 Canadian-born mothers take...

2009-04-15 09:03:02

German scientists say they've discovered very immature sheep fetuses can enter a dreaming sleep-like state weeks before rapid eye movements develop. The Friedrich Schiller University researchers in Jena, Germany, led by mathematician Karin Schwab noted that after about seven months growing in the womb, a human fetus spends most of its time asleep. Its brain cycles between rapid eye movement sleep and the quiet resting state of non-REM sleep. But whether the brains of younger, immature fetuses...

2009-04-15 11:57:03

Children are affected by what their mother did not eat during her pregnancy, U.S. researchers say. The study, published in the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Journal, suggests some health risks passed across generations may be linked to poor nutrition in the womb. The study involved rats, but the researchers say the genes and cellular mechanisms involved are the same as those in humans. Our study emphasizes that maternal-fetal health influences multiple healthcare...

2009-04-14 08:16:40

New research in AIP's journal Chaos reveals sleep cycles in early fetus After about seven months growing in the womb, a human fetus spends most of its time asleep. Its brain cycles back and forth between the frenzied activity of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and the quiet resting state of non-REM sleep. But whether the brains of younger, immature fetuses cycle with sleep or are simply inactive has remained a mystery, until now. Mathematician Karin Schwab and a team of neuroscientists at...

2009-03-23 00:01:00

Surgeons at North Carolina's Duke University Medical Center say they have performed surgery on a fetus to repair a heart defect. The heart was critically malformed and lacked proper channels for blood flow, The (Raleigh, N.C.) News & Observer reported Sunday. In November, surgeons threaded a needle through the mother's abdomen into the womb, into the fetus' chest, and finally into the heart, to open a hole between the upper left and upper right chambers. Before Nathan Brindle was born in...

2009-03-05 10:00:00

NEW YORK, March 5 /PRNewswire/ -- WHO: The Columbia University Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology is happy to announce that Charles S. Kleinman, M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics in Obstetrics/Gynecology and Director of Fetal Cardiology at Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital of New York Presbyterian will begin seeing patients at our practice on East 60th Street. Dr. Kleinman is the "Father of Fetal Echocardiography" and...

2009-01-21 10:05:13

Moms to be may have more reason to stick to a healthy diet while they're pregnant. New research indicates a developing baby's health can be affected by the amount of fat consumed by his or her mother. There has been a recent rise in the United States in the number of children classified as obese and diagnosed with obesity-related diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Previous studies pointed to the weight of an obese child's mother during pregnancy....

2009-01-15 10:17:48

Rats whose mothers were fed alcohol during pregnancy are more attracted to the smell of liquor during puberty. Researchers writing in BioMed Central's open access journal Behavioral and Brain Functions have shown that rats exposed during gestation find the smell of alcohol on another rat's breath during adolescence more attractive than animals with no prior fetal exposure.Professor Steven Youngentob from the State University of New York Upstate Medical University, USA, led a team of...

2009-01-07 14:16:58

Asian immigrants in the United States appear to be using medical technology to guarantee that second or third children will be male, U.S. researchers say. Studies at the University of Texas and Columbia University reached similar conclusions, the San Jose, Calif., Mercury News reported. Both found that couples from China, India and South Korea have more boys than expected among later children when their first-born is a female. The surveys suggest that couples leave the gender of the first...

2008-12-21 13:43:28

Researchers at the Baylor School of Medicine in Houston say they are making breakthroughs in enhanced DNA testing of unborn fetuses. Dr. Arthur Beaudet, head of the school's molecular and human genetics department, said the cutting-edge services being developed at Baylor should be able to reveal previously undetectable disorders in fetuses, the Houston Chronicle reported Saturday. This is the beginning of a sea change in prenatal diagnosis, the research head said. I think it will replace...


Word of the Day
callithump
  • A somewhat riotous parade, accompanied with the blowing of tin horns, and other discordant noises; also, a burlesque serenade; a charivari.
'Callithump' is a back-formation of 'callithumpian,' a 'fanciful formation' according to the Oxford English Dictionary. However, the English Dialect Dictionary, says 'Gallithumpians' is a Dorset and Devon word from the 1790s that refers to 'a society of radical social reformers' or 'noisy disturbers of elections and meetings.'
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