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Latest Fibronectin Stories

2014-07-02 10:59:23

Every living cell's surface has a protein-embedded membrane that's covered in polysaccharide chains – a literal sugar coating.

Cancer Cells Break Away
2012-10-11 09:30:45

A new study from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has revealed that cancer cells break away from tumors via adhesion molecules, causing a spread of cancer throughout the body.

2012-04-24 23:24:38

Fibronectin plays a major role in wound healing and embryonic development.

2012-02-10 10:31:58

Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most lethal form of breast cancer.

2012-01-23 22:07:58

Metastasizing cancer cells often express integrins that provide better traction.

2011-10-24 22:51:44

Infectious films of Staph bacteria around an implanted cardiac device, such as a pacemaker, often force a second surgery to replace the device at a cost of up to $100,000.

2011-03-22 23:06:32

Ninety percent of cancer deaths resulted from metastasis, the spread of cancer to different areas in the body, yet scientific exploration of the possible mechanical factors that promote metastasis has been limited.

2009-03-19 09:43:40

Research conducted by Allison Berrier, PhD, Assistant Professor of Oral and Craniofacial Biology at the LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Dentistry, and colleagues, provides insights that may help scientists design novel approaches to control wound healing and fight diseases such as cancer and fibrosis.

2009-02-25 11:35:28

Researchers have found a way to block the ability of white blood cells to sprint toward the sites of infection when such speed worsens the damage done by sepsis, the often fatal, whole-body bacterial infection, according to a study published today in the journal Blood.


Word of the Day
dingle
  • A small wooded valley; a dell.
  • The protecting weather-shed built around the entrance to a house.
  • The roofed-over space between the kitchen and the sleeping-quarters in a logging-camp, commonly used as a storeroom.
The word 'dingle' comes from Middle English dell, hollow.
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