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Latest Field cricket Stories

Among Insects, Chivalry Is Not Dead
2011-10-06 14:17:05

The long-standing consensus of why insects stick together after mating has been turned on its head by scientists from the University of Exeter. Published today in Current Biology, their study shows that, contrary to previous thinking, females benefit from this arrangement just as much as males.

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2010-06-04 08:33:45

Tracing the success of individual wild insects in leaving descendants is now possible according to new research by University of Exeter biologists using a combination of digital video technology, tagging and DNA fingerprinting.

2009-09-08 09:54:21

Scientists have found new evidence to explain how female insects can influence the father of their offspring, even after mating with up to ten males. A team from the University of Exeter has found that female crickets are able to control the amount of sperm that they store from each mate to select the best father for their young.

2009-04-22 10:25:11

UC Riverside biologists researching the behavior of field crickets have found for the first time that female crickets remember attractive males based on the latter's song, and use this information when choosing mates.

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2009-01-07 10:30:00

In a study published in the Dec 24 issue of the online, open-access, peer-reviewed journal PLoS ONE, Judge and co-author Vanessa Bonanno show that, indeed, males with larger heads and mouthparts are more successful in fights with smaller-headed rivals.

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2007-07-27 13:05:00

They congregate on patios, slip into stairwells and, if they're crunched under foot, oh do they stink. Crickets are here in force, annoying Texans earlier than usual - thanks to the year's wet weather in much of the state.


Latest Field cricket Reference Libraries

40_941d9b831618c7e24a221338360c02ca
2005-09-08 14:48:50

Crickets, family Gryllidae (also known as "true crickets"), are insects which are related to grasshoppers and katydids (order Orthoptera). They have somewhat flattened bodies and long antennae and are known for their chirp (which only male crickets can do; male wings have ridges that act like a "comb and file" instrument). They chirp by rubbing their wings over each other, and the song is species-specific. There are two types of cricket songs: a calling song and a courting song. The...

0_80b600c3cd3494e8a4c494affbdaba4d
2005-07-13 16:57:18

Crickets, family Gryllidae (also known as "true crickets"), are insects related to grasshoppers and katydids (order Orthoptera). They have somewhat flattened bodies and long antennae. Crickets are known for the loud chirping noises they make by rubbing their wings together. Only male crickets sing as the male wings have ridges that act like a "comb and file" that produces a song that is species specific. Interestingly in 1970, Dr. William H. Cade discovered that the parasitic fly Ormia...

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Word of the Day
donative
  • A gift; a largess; a gratuity; a present; a dole.
The word 'donative' comes from a Latin word meaning 'to give'.
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