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Latest Filariasis Stories

2008-09-09 03:00:09

By Sahare, K N Anandharaman, V; Meshram, V G; Meshram, S U; Gajalakshmi, D; Goswami, K; Reddy, M V R Background & objectives: Disease burden due to lymphatic filariasis is disproportionately high despite mass drug administration with conventional drugs. Usage of herbal drugs in traditional medicine is quite well known but largely empirical. Hence the present study was designed to screen the in vitro antifilarial effect of four herbal plants on Brugia malayi. Methods: Motility of...

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2008-08-31 13:25:00

No more big stink: Scent lures mosquitoes, but humans can't smell it A University of California, Davis research team led by chemical ecologist Walter Leal has discovered a low-cost, easy-to-prepare attractant that lures blood-fed mosquitoes without making humans hold their noses. The synthetic mixture, containing compounds trimethylamine and nonanal in low doses, is just as enticing to Culex mosquitoes as the current attractants, Leal said, but this one is odorless to humans. The research,...

2008-07-17 15:00:00

By DIANA MARRERO By DIANA MARRERO Washington -- Nearly a year after dropping out of the presidential race, Tommy Thompson is turning his attention to worms. Thompson, the former Wisconsin governor who later served as the country's top health official, has teamed up with a nonprofit health organization to fight hookworm, whipworm and other tropical diseases that affect 1 billion of the world's poorest people. He says this type of "medical diplomacy" could help build support for the...

2008-07-08 15:00:56

TOYAKO, Japan, July 8 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- "The worldwide pharmaceutical industry is joining the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) in calling on the G-8 to recognize the importance of neglected diseases as a global health threat and a major strain on the economic viability and educational development of communities worldwide. We urge the G-8 to finance successful treatment and prevention programs, to support innovative strategies...

2006-03-23 22:50:00

LONDON (Reuters) - Egypt is close to eliminating elephantiasis -- one of the world's most disfiguring diseases -- which has plagued the country since the time of the pharaohs, scientists said on Friday. The condition, known officially as lymphatic filariasis (LF), is caused by a microscopic parasitic worm spread by mosquitoes. It can cause devastating symptoms such as grotesquely swollen limbs, as well as fevers and pain. Yet researchers reported in the Lancet medical journal that a simple...

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2005-06-24 14:50:00

The disease is triggered off by the bite of an infected mosquito: together with its anticoagulant the mosquito pumps threadworm larvae into its host's body. These gravitate towards the lymph nodes, where they grow into threadworms which may be up to ten centimetres long. The body reacts by producing inflammation which halts the flow of lymphatic fluid. The consequence of this is that arms, legs and genitals swell to monstrous proportions "“ hence the name elephantiasis. More than 120...


Latest Filariasis Reference Libraries

Onchocerca volvulus
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Onchocerca volvulus is a species of roundworm that is classified within the Nematoda phylum. This species causes the disease onchocerciasis, more commonly known as river blindness. The life cycle of this species is dependent upon an intermediate host, typically the black fly, and a definitive host, which is always a human. Its lifecycle begins when a black fly ingests microfilariae from a human host by consuming blood. The microfilariae that were present in the skin of the human host now...

Eye-worm, Loa loa
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The eye-worm (Loa loa) is a species of roundworm within the Nematoda phylum. It can be found in India and Africa, among other areas. This species causes a disease known as Loa loa filariasis and is one of three species that can cause subcutaneous filariasis in humans. Females are larger than males, reaching an average body length of up to 2.7 inches, with males reaching an average body length of up to 1.3 inches. The first stage of life for the eye-worm begins when an adult worm, which is...

Wuchereria bancrofti
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Wuchereria bancrofti is a species of roundworm in the Nematoda phylum. This species is spread through a mosquito vector, which means that it is transferred through mosquitos. This species infects over 120 million people in South America, Africa, and other tropical and subtropical areas. It is one of three species of parasitic worm that can cause lymphatic filariasis, which can lead to elephantiasis. The disease is wrongfully named, because the term translates to “a disease caused by...

Wuchereria bancrofti
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Wuchereria bancrofti is a species of roundworm in the Nematoda phylum. This species is spread through a mosquito vector, which means that it is transferred through mosquitos. This species infects over 120 million people in South America, Africa, and other tropical and subtropical areas. It is one of three species of parasitic worm that can cause lymphatic filariasis, which can lead to elephantiasis. The disease is wrongfully named, because the term translates to “a disease caused by...

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2008-08-06 17:58:39

The Deer Fly (Chrysops spp.), also known as the "yellow fly", is a fly of the family Tabanidae that can be a pest to cattle, horses, and humans. It is often found in damp environments, such as wetlands or forests. It lays clusters of shiny black eggs on the leaves of small plants by water. The aquatic larvae feed on small insects and pupate in the mud at the edge of the water. The Deer Fly is often considered a horse-fly. A distinguishing characteristic is its patterned gold or green eyes....

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Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.