Quantcast

Latest Fire ecology Stories

2014-08-12 08:23:46

ASHLAND, Ore., Aug. 12, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Two recently published scientific studies add to a growing body of research on the ecological importance of forest fires, even severe ones, in the western U.S, particularly California's Sierra region. Photo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140811/135259 One study, published in Natural Areas Journal (http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.3375/043.034.0317), documented the ecological importance of forest fires for numerous plants and...

2014-07-28 13:12:56

ESA Before the colonial era, 100,000s of people lived on the land now called California, and many of their cultures manipulated fire to control the availability of plants they used for food, fuel, tools, and ritual. Contemporary tribes continue to use fire to maintain desired habitat and natural resources. Frank Lake, an ecologist with the U.S. Forest Service’s Pacific Southwest Station, will lead a field trip to the Stone Lake National Wildlife Refuge during the Ecological Society of...

2014-05-13 08:24:49

ASHLAND, Ore., May 13, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Fire scientists are releasing a new synthesis of the ecological benefits of large wildfires, including those that kill most vegetation in fire-adapted forests, grasslands, and shrub lands of the western U.S. Photo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140512/86768Photo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140512/86755 These benefits are described in a Prezi presentation, "Fireside Chat: Lessons from Fire Ecology and Post-fire...

Invasive Grass May Be Contributing To Extreme Wildfires
2012-12-06 13:33:34

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online An international team of scientists comprised of members from Penn State, UMass Amherst, UC Santa Barbara (UCSB) and University College London has revealed that an invasive grass species may be one reason that fires are bigger and more frequent in certain regions of the western U.S. Using satellite imagery, the team identified cheatgrass — a plant species accidentally introduced by western settlers during the 1800s...

science-051812-004
2012-05-18 07:43:37

[ Watch the Video ] Brett Smith for RedOrbit.com A study led by anthropologist Christopher I. Roos from Southern Methodist University in Dallas shows that modern “mega forest fires” in the southwestern U.S. are the result of dense canopies that likely grew as a result of human interference. “The U.S. would not be experiencing massive large-canopy-killing crown fires today if human activities had not begun to suppress the low-severity surface fires that were so...

25df0202f6cb62802c06c778292de92f1
2010-02-24 14:49:54

With a changing climate there's a good chance that forest fires in the Pacific Northwest will become larger and more frequent "“ and according to one expert speaking today at a professional conference, that's just fine. The future of fire in this region is difficult to predict, will always be variable, and undoubtedly a part of the future landscape. People should understand, however, that fire is not only inevitable but also a valuable part of forest ecosystems and their management,...

2009-09-17 16:30:00

TreePeople and partners prepare for reforestation in fire-devastated national parks LOS ANGELES, Sept. 17 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The historic Angeles Forest Station Fire devastated more than 160,500 acres of forest lands, including the heart of Los Angeles' upper watershed and the headwaters of the Los Angeles River. TreePeople's California Wildfire Restoration Initiative, a private/public partnership, is already receiving requests from volunteers to replant the fire-damaged...

fd5c96eede21f5e6042915f38f9f6f001
2009-07-07 15:51:18

U.S. scientists say they've determined climate -- not high temperatures or longer fire seasons -- is the most significant factor in wildfires. Scientists at the U.S. Forest Service's Pacific Northwest Research Station and from the University of Washington said the recent increase in area burned by wildfires in the Western United States is a product of a complex relationship between climate and fuels that varies among different ecosystems/ We found that what matters most in accounting for...

2009-06-26 08:44:05

Study finds that climate's influence on production, drying of fuels -- not higher temperatures or longer fire seasons alone -- critical determinant of Western wildfire burned areaThe recent increase in area burned by wildfires in the Western United States is a product not of higher temperatures or longer fire seasons alone, but a complex relationship between climate and fuels that varies among different ecosystems, according to a study conducted by U.S. Forest Service and university...

2008-07-27 03:00:25

By Duncan, Riva Many who work in fire management will, at some time in their career, face something difficult, an "abrupt and brutal audit" (Lagadec 1993) that will shake their confidence at best and leave them heartbroken at worst. I know. How do some of us get through those dark days, learn from our mistakes, and continue to do our jobs as best we can? What makes some of us "bounce back" from a serious accident, a fatality, or an escaped prescribed fire and continue to do the work on...


Word of the Day
cruet
  • A vial or small glass bottle, especially one for holding vinegar, oil, etc.; a caster for liquids.
This word is Middle English in origin, and ultimately comes from the Old French, diminutive of 'crue,' flask.
Related