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Latest Fish anatomy Stories

Adipose Fins Evolve Repeatedly In Teleost Fishes
2014-03-05 10:33:13

University of Chicago Though present in more than 6,000 living species of fish, the adipose fin, a small appendage that lies between the dorsal fin and tail, has no clear function and is thought to be vestigial. However, a new study analyzing their origins finds that these fins arose repeatedly and independently in multiple species. In addition, adipose fins appear to have repeatedly and independently evolved a skeleton, offering a glimpse into how new tissue types and structural...

Genetic Basis For Behavior In Fish Found
2013-09-12 19:08:48

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com – Your Universe Online A new study on the schooling habits of fish could provide new insights into the social behaviors and natural variations of humans. Published on Thursday in the journal Current Biology, the new study was able to trace the tendency and the aptitude for schooling to different genomic regions in the threespine stickleback, a small fish that lives in the Northern Hemisphere. "The motivation to be social is common among fish and...

Ancient Fish Fossils Give Insight Into Evolutionary History Of Gobioid Order
2013-05-16 13:51:46

LMU Fish fossils that are about 23 million years old give unprecedented insight into the evolutionary history of the gobioid order, one of the most species-rich groups among the modern bony fishes. Researchers led by paleontologist Professor Bettina Reichenbacher from the Division of Paleontology and Geobiology at LMU´s Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences have completed a comprehensive analysis of fish fossils which they assign to the group of bony fishes that includes...

New Insight Into Evolution Offered From Unusual Anal Fin
2013-04-10 09:31:33

University of Manchester An unusual fossil fish that has fins behind its anus could have implications for human evolution according to a scientist at The University of Manchester. Dr Robert Sansom from the Faculty of Life Sciences identified the paired fins of Euphanerops, a fossil jawless fish that swam in the seas around 370 million years ago. The find makes the fish one of the first vertebrate to develop paired appendages such as fins, legs or arms. However, their positioning is...

Researchers Attempting To Develop Prosthetic Flippers For Injured Loggerhead Turtle
2013-02-17 08:53:47

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports — Your Universe Online Officials at a Japanese aquarium are looking for a high-tech apparatus that will help an injured, endangered loggerhead turtle regain the ability to swim after she lost both front flippers in a 2008 shark attack. The 25-year-old turtle, which is named Yu, currently resides at the Suma Aqualife Park in Kobe, where she was transported following the attack five years ago, according to Ruairidh Villar of Reuters. "She was in...

Fish Ear Bones Can Offer Clues To Impacts Of Climate Change In Aquatic Environments
2012-11-28 11:38:09

CSIRO Australia The earbones, or 'otoliths', help fish to detect movement and to orient themselves in the water. Otoliths set down annual growth rings that can be measured and counted to estimate the age and growth rates of fish. "Otoliths can form the basis of new techniques for modelling fish growth, productivity and distribution in future environments," said Dr John Morrongiello of CSIRO's Wealth from Oceans Flagship, lead author of a paper published online in Nature Climate Change...

How Does The Swim Bladder Affect Hearing In Cichlid Fish?
2012-08-08 11:35:57

"Sound vibrations are transmitted to the inner ear via anterior extensions of the swim bladder or via bony ossicles", the biologist Tanja Schulz-Mirbach explains how swim bladders may serve for hearing. The hearing sensitivity improves considerably in this way. The anterior part of the swim bladder functions in specialized fish species similar to an ear drum. Up to now the effects of the different swim bladder morphologies have not been investigated in detail in cichlid fishes. The...

2012-06-21 12:03:05

Fish-saving sound threshold recommended for pile driving projects The rise of ocean infrastructure development to tap energy sources such as tides, offshore wind and natural gas will require more pile driving, the practice of pounding long, hollow steel pipes called piles into the ocean floor to support energy turbines and other structures. But pile driving creates loud, underwater booms that can harm fish and other marine animals. Many scientists and regulators have assumed that...

2012-03-12 15:00:34

University of Rhode Island marine biologist Jacqueline Webb gets an occasional strange look when she brings fish to the Orthopedics Research Lab at Rhode Island Hospital. While the facility's microCT scanner is typically used to study bone density and diseases like osteoporosis, it is also providing new insights into the skull structure and sensory systems of fish. A professor of biological sciences and director of the marine biology program at URI, Webb studies the lateral line system, a...

2011-01-10 15:07:49

Common genetic recipes pattern organs as different as shark gills and human hands A SCUBA expedition in Australia and New Zealand to find the rare embryos of an unusual shark cousin enabled American and British researchers to confirm new developmental similarities between fish and mammals. Elephant fish, a relative of sharks, utilize the same genetic process for forming skeletal gill covers that lizards and mammals use to form fingers and toes, researchers at the University of Chicago and the...


Latest Fish anatomy Reference Libraries

Asian Arowana, Scleropages formosus
2013-10-17 08:51:48

The Asian Arowana (Scleropages formosus) comprises several phenotypic varieties of freshwater fish that are distributed geographically across Southeast Asia. As they are native to Southeast Asia, Asian Arowana inhabits blackwater rivers and slow moving water flowing through the forested swamps and wetlands. The adults feed on other fish while the juveniles feed on insects. These popular aquarium fish have special cultural importance in areas that are influenced by the Chinese culture....

Butler’s Frogfish, Tathicarpus butleri
2013-10-15 10:45:52

The Butler’s Frogfish (Tathicarpus butleri), known also as the blackspot anglerfish, is a rare species of frogfish belonging to the family Antennariidae. The only member of its genus, this species is the most derived member of its family, representing a separate lineage from all other frogfishes, leading to some consideration of it being placed in its own family. It can be found off the southern coast of New Guinea, and along the coasts of Western Australia, the Northern Territory, and...

Psychedelic frogfish, Histiophryne psychedelica
2013-03-28 14:20:18

The psychedelic frogfish is found only around Ambon Island, Indonesia at depths of 16 - 23 feet in coral rubble about 66 feet from the shoreline. This fish was discovered in 1992 amongst a shipment of assorted fish that was delivered to the Dallas Aquarium at Fair Park. But was not observed or photographed in the wild until 2008. The psychedelic frogfish was named one of the top ten new species discovered in 2009 by Arizona State University's International Institute for Species Exploration...

Little tunny, Euthynnus alletteratus
2013-03-28 14:07:39

The little tunny is found widespread in temperate and tropical waters of the Atlantic Ocean, Black Sea and Mediterranean Sea. It is the most common tuna and is highly migratory, with a range from Cape Cod, Massachusetts to Brazil in the Western Atlantic. In the Eastern Atlantic it is found from Skagerrak to South Africa. The little tunny will form schools close to the shoreline, around inlets, and sandbars that can cover up to two miles. This fish prefers warm water and will migrate south in...

Hawaiian Flagtail, Kuhlia Sandvicensis
2012-12-26 06:21:13

During the day Hawaiian flagtail (locally known as Aholehole) huddle in schools around the top of reefs and along drop-offs where turbulent water creates bubbles hiding them from predators in and around the Hawaiian Islands. Young flagtails will form schools in the shallow water near sandy beaches, mouths of streams, tide pools, and brackish water (salt and fresh water combined). At night the fish will swim to deeper water to feed. The Hawaiian flagtail has fairly large eyes in comparison...

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Word of the Day
kenspeckle
  • Having so marked an appearance as easily to be recognized.
This word may come from the Swedish 'kanspak,' quick at recognizing persons or things, or else from confusion with 'conspicuous.'