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Latest Fish anatomy Stories

2009-08-28 10:16:36

Fish and some amphibians possess a unique sensory capability in the so-called lateral-line system. It allows them, in effect, to "touch" objects in their surroundings without direct physical contact or to "see" in the dark. Professor Leo van Hermmen and his team in the physics department of the Technische Universities Muenchen are exploring the fundamental basis for this sensory system. What they discover might one day, through biomimetic engineering, better equip robots to orient themselves...

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2009-06-26 06:05:00

For years scientists have observed the deleterious effects of rising levels of carbon dioxide in the oceans on shellfish and corals.  Now, a new study by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography has provided evidence that the physiological development of fish ears is also impacted by the gas. In the June 26 edition of the journal Science, researchers from the San Diego-based institute published a short paper outlining the results of experiments in which young white seabass were...

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2009-04-14 08:23:14

Lateral line sensory system detects vibrations from unseen prey Most fish rely primarily on their vision to find prey to feed upon, but a University of Rhode Island biologist and her colleagues have demonstrated that a group of African cichlids feeds by using its lateral line sensory system to detect minute vibrations made by prey hidden in the sediments. The lateral line system is composed of a canal embedded in the scales along the side of the body of a fish, around its eyes and on its...

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2009-03-24 07:45:00

The genetic toolkit that animals use to build fins and limbs is the same genetic toolkit that controls the development of part of the gill skeleton in sharks, according to research to be published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on March 23, 2009, by Andrew Gillis and Neil Shubin of the University of Chicago, and Randall Dahn of Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory. "In fact, the skeleton of any appendage off the body of an animal is probably patterned by the...

2009-02-10 10:50:58

A paper in this week's PLoS Biology reports that a common gene regulatory circuit controls the development of all dentitions, from the first teeth in the throats of jawless fishes that lived half a billion years ago, to the incisors and molars of modern vertebrates, including you and me. "It's likely that every tooth made throughout the evolution of vertebrates has used this core set of genes," said Gareth Fraser, postdoctoral fellow at Georgia Tech's School of Biology. The first vertebrates...

2008-10-02 03:00:25

By Longenecker, Ken Abstract: Estimating body size of fishes from remains recovered from piscivores, archaeological sites, and sedimentary deposits is desirable but rarely accomplished because the relationships between the size of a fish and its durable anatomical structures are largely unknown. Regression equations to predict the size or weight of 41 common Hawaiian reef fishes from sagittae (saccular otoliths) are presented. Data are also grouped into higher taxa to permit size...

2008-06-29 06:02:25

By Luntz, Stephen Increasing ocean acidity as a result of carbon emissions may be making it hard for fish to form symmetrical otoliths (ear bones), creating a further threat to the health of coral reef ecosystems as fish with asymmetrical ear bones struggle to find their way to the safety of coral reefs. Dr Monica Gagliano of the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) was part of a team investigating damselfish otoliths. At hatching they found that 59% had asymmetrical otoliths....

2007-04-03 09:00:10

By Duffin, Christopher John Abstract The folklore associated with fish otoliths is traced from classical times to the present day for the first time. Otolithomancy involved divination of maritime weather conditions by consulting the properties and morphology of the "stones." In folk medicine, they were employed in the treatment of renal problems, malarial fever, nose bleeds, jaundice, pain, and swellings in the groin. They were also believed to act as aphrodisiacs. Modern applications...

2007-02-10 10:43:32

LIMA, Peru -- Peruvian archaeologists displayed more than 400 seized shark teeth, shells and fish fossils as old as 12 million years on Friday, saying customs officials have already made twice the number of such seizures this year than they did in 2006. Peru's National Culture Institute said fossil trafficking is a growing problem because the items are highly valued in foreign markets. So far this year, customs agents have made 947 fossil seizures, compared to 461 all of last year, Javier...

2007-01-02 03:00:26

By Friedman, Matt; Blom, Henning ABSTRACT- A new actinopterygian, Cuneognathus gardineri new genus and species, is described from the Devonian (Famennian) Obrutschew Bjerg Formation of East Greenland on the basis of multiple incomplete specimens. Cuneognathus most closely resembles Limnomis from the Famennian Catskill Formation of Pennsylvania, and, like that taxon, is known exclusively from freshwater deposits. A cladistic analysis with an ingroup of 13 actinopterygians and an outgroup...


Latest Fish anatomy Reference Libraries

Asian Arowana, Scleropages formosus
2013-10-17 08:51:48

The Asian Arowana (Scleropages formosus) comprises several phenotypic varieties of freshwater fish that are distributed geographically across Southeast Asia. As they are native to Southeast Asia, Asian Arowana inhabits blackwater rivers and slow moving water flowing through the forested swamps and wetlands. The adults feed on other fish while the juveniles feed on insects. These popular aquarium fish have special cultural importance in areas that are influenced by the Chinese culture....

Butler’s Frogfish, Tathicarpus butleri
2013-10-15 10:45:52

The Butler’s Frogfish (Tathicarpus butleri), known also as the blackspot anglerfish, is a rare species of frogfish belonging to the family Antennariidae. The only member of its genus, this species is the most derived member of its family, representing a separate lineage from all other frogfishes, leading to some consideration of it being placed in its own family. It can be found off the southern coast of New Guinea, and along the coasts of Western Australia, the Northern Territory, and...

Psychedelic frogfish, Histiophryne psychedelica
2013-03-28 14:20:18

The psychedelic frogfish is found only around Ambon Island, Indonesia at depths of 16 - 23 feet in coral rubble about 66 feet from the shoreline. This fish was discovered in 1992 amongst a shipment of assorted fish that was delivered to the Dallas Aquarium at Fair Park. But was not observed or photographed in the wild until 2008. The psychedelic frogfish was named one of the top ten new species discovered in 2009 by Arizona State University's International Institute for Species Exploration...

Little tunny, Euthynnus alletteratus
2013-03-28 14:07:39

The little tunny is found widespread in temperate and tropical waters of the Atlantic Ocean, Black Sea and Mediterranean Sea. It is the most common tuna and is highly migratory, with a range from Cape Cod, Massachusetts to Brazil in the Western Atlantic. In the Eastern Atlantic it is found from Skagerrak to South Africa. The little tunny will form schools close to the shoreline, around inlets, and sandbars that can cover up to two miles. This fish prefers warm water and will migrate south in...

Hawaiian Flagtail, Kuhlia Sandvicensis
2012-12-26 06:21:13

During the day Hawaiian flagtail (locally known as Aholehole) huddle in schools around the top of reefs and along drop-offs where turbulent water creates bubbles hiding them from predators in and around the Hawaiian Islands. Young flagtails will form schools in the shallow water near sandy beaches, mouths of streams, tide pools, and brackish water (salt and fresh water combined). At night the fish will swim to deeper water to feed. The Hawaiian flagtail has fairly large eyes in comparison...

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Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.