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Last updated on April 18, 2014 at 11:57 EDT
Four New Species Of Killer Sponges Discovered

Four New Species Of 'Killer Sponges' Discovered

MBARI [ Watch the Video: Four New Species Of Carnivorous Sponges Discovered ] Killer sponges sound like creatures from a B-grade horror movie. In fact, they thrive in the lightless depths of the deep sea. Scientists first discovered that...

Latest Fisheries Stories

2014-04-10 09:45:00

Oyster aquaculture in the Potomac River estuary could result in significant improvements to water quality, according to a new NOAA and U.S. Geological Survey study published in the journal Aquatic Geochemistry. All of the nitrogen currently polluting the Potomac River estuary could be removed if 40 percent of its river bed were used for shellfish cultivation, according to the joint study. The researchers determined that a combination of aquaculture and restored oyster reefs may provide...

2014-04-03 20:21:29

Port State Measures Agreement will strengthen inspection standards to keep illegally caught fish from reaching market WASHINGTON, April 3, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The United States Senate on April 3 took a strong stand in the global fight against illegal fishing by ratifying a treaty that will prevent illegally caught fish from entering the market through ports around the world. The treaty, called the Port State Measures Agreement, or PSMA, also would empower port officials...

Deepwater Horizon oil spill
2014-03-26 05:02:48

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Crude oil from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster has been causing heart abnormalities in some large marine fish, according to research appearing Tuesday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. In the study, researchers from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and colleagues from American and Australian universities say the 200 million gallons of petroleum that spilled into the...

2014-03-25 23:01:10

HOBO® U22 Data Loggers Monitor Potentially Damaging Increases in Local Sea Temperature and Determine Effects on Coral Bourne, MA (PRWEB) March 25, 2014 At Naitauba, Fiji, a 2,000-acre island completely encircled by a coral reef, the Naitauba Reef Initiative is working with researchers from the University of the South Pacific (USP) School of Marine Studies to learn as much as possible about all aspects of the reef. Onset’s HOBO U22 Water Temperature Pro v2 data loggers are being...

intensive fishing's collateral damage
2014-03-21 09:07:51

By Rob Jordan, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment Biology researcher joins with other scientists to chart intensive fishing's collateral damage. Seabirds, sea turtles and marine mammals such as dolphins may not appear to have much in common, other than an affinity for open water. The sad truth is that they are all unintended victims – by-catch – of intensive global fishing. In fact, accidental entanglement in fishing gear is the single biggest threat to some species in...

2014-03-20 23:01:26

A new report from environmental group Oceana slams US fisheries for allegedly wasteful bycatch, but a Saving Seafood analysis shows the report ignores industry efforts and successes in by-catch reduction and conservation efforts. Washington, DC (PRWEB) March 20, 2014 Today, Oceana released a report and accompanying press release, Wasted Catch: Unsolved Bycatch Problems in U.S. Fisheries, which calls out nine U.S. fisheries for allegedly wasteful practices producing harmful levels of...

Adipose Fins Evolve Repeatedly In Teleost Fishes
2014-03-05 10:33:13

University of Chicago Though present in more than 6,000 living species of fish, the adipose fin, a small appendage that lies between the dorsal fin and tail, has no clear function and is thought to be vestigial. However, a new study analyzing their origins finds that these fins arose repeatedly and independently in multiple species. In addition, adipose fins appear to have repeatedly and independently evolved a skeleton, offering a glimpse into how new tissue types and structural...

elkhorn coral
2014-02-28 08:28:25

University of Southampton A new publication from researchers at the University of Southampton and the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton highlights the importance of nutrients for coral reef survival. Despite the comparably small footprint they take on the ocean floor, tropical coral reefs are home to a substantial part of all marine life forms. Coral reefs also provide numerous benefits for human populations, providing food for millions and protecting coastal areas from erosion....

2014-02-27 18:37:30

Reducing the size of the Lake Erie "dead zone" to acceptable levels will require cutting nutrient pollution nearly in half in coming decades, at a time when climate change is expected to make such reductions more difficult. That's one of the main conclusions of a comprehensive new study that documents recent trends in Lake Erie's health. It offers science-based guidance to policymakers seeking to reduce the size of toxic algae blooms and oxygen-starved regions called hypoxic zones, or dead...

Where Did All The Codfish Go?
2014-02-27 13:44:10

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa The mega-decline in cod and other fisheries across the North Atlantic Ocean threatens the livelihood of fishermen and communities in New England and Atlantic Canada. One suspect in the disappearance of cod and other groundfish is the food source for their young: a planktonic copepod crustacean, no larger than a grain of rice. Recent changes in local copepod populations have co-occurred with declines in fisheries elsewhere, such as the collapse of the cod...


Latest Fisheries Reference Libraries

Crown Of Thorns Starfish, Acanthaster planci
2013-11-11 10:54:41

The crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci) is a species of starfish that is classified within the Acanthasteridae family. This species has a large range that extends from the Red Sea to the African coasts in the east and from the Indian Ocean to the western coasts of Central America. It prefers a habitat in coral reefs, which can be harmed if population numbers are too high. Damage occurs when filamentous algae covers bare skeletons of coral and the starfish move in to feed, stripping...

Bluefish, Pomatomus saltatrix
2013-10-22 10:54:52

The Bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) is the only living species of the family Pomatomidae. It is a marine pelagic fish that can be found around the world in temperate and subtropical waters, except for the northern Pacific Ocean. Bluefish are known as tailor in Australia, shad on the east coast of South Africa, and elf on the west coast. Other common names regarding this fish are blue, chopper, and anchoa. It is a good eating and game fish. The bluefish is moderately proportioned with a...

Lampert's Sea Cucumber, Synaptula lamperti
2013-04-30 15:18:06

Synaptula lamperti is a species of sea cucumber that can be found in the waters of the Indo-Pacific. Its range includes the coastal waters of Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Indonesia, and Micronesia. It does not have the tube feet, which are common to other species of sea cucumber, instead moving around by using a small grouping of pinnate feeding tentacles, which are always moving. It can also move by using the small, hook-like bones found along its body, attaching itself to the sea...

Mudflats
2013-04-19 21:07:34

Mudflats, or otherwise known as tidal flats, are coastal wetlands that form when mud is left behind by tides or rivers. They’re found in sheltered regions such as bayous, lagoons, estuaries, and bays. Mudflats might be seen geologically as exposed layers of bay mud, a result from the deposition of estuarine silts, marine animal detritus, and clays. The majority of the sediment in a mudflat is within the intertidal zone, therefore the flat is submerged and exposed about twice per day. In...

Kelp Forest
2013-04-19 19:29:03

Kelp forests are areas that are underwater with a high density of kelp. They’re recognized as one of the most dynamic and productive ecosystems on Earth. Smaller regions of anchored kelp are known as kelp beds. Kelp forests can be found worldwide throughout polar and temperate coastal oceans. In the year 2007, kelp forests were discovered in tropical waters near Ecuador as well. While they are physically formed by brown macroalgae of the order Laminariales, kelp forests offer a unique...

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