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Latest Fisheries Stories

2013-02-07 15:02:51

Researchers from the University of Bonn found out that tiny foraminifera in the oceans can save islands The climate is getting warmer, and sea levels are rising — a threat to island nations. As a group of researchers lead by colleagues from the University of Bonn found out, at the same time, tiny single-cell organisms are spreading rapidly through the world's oceans, where they might be able to mitigate the consequences of climate change. Foraminifera of the variety Amphistegina are...

Growth Of Toxic Algae Caused By Nitrogen From Pollution And Natural Sources
2013-02-07 10:17:49

San Francisco State University Nitrogen in ocean waters fuels the growth of two tiny but toxic phytoplankton species that are harmful to marine life and human health, warns a new study published in the Journal of Phycology. Researchers from San Francisco State University found that nitrogen entering the ocean -- whether through natural processes or pollution -- boosts the growth and toxicity of a group of phytoplankton that can cause the human illness Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning....

2013-02-06 16:07:28

Same-sized fish stick together, using chemical cues to identify each other Have you ever wondered why, and how, shoals of fish are comprised of fish of the same size? According to new research by Ashley Ward, from the University of Sydney in Australia, and Suzanne Currie, from Mount Allison University in Canada, fish can use a variety of different sensory cues to locate shoal-mates, but they are able to use chemical cues to find other fish of the same size as themselves. Using these cues,...

2013-02-06 16:02:40

Perceived risk of predation increased acceptance of immigrants into group Cichlid fish are more likely to accept immigrants into their group when they are under threat from predators and need reinforcements, new research shows. The researcher suggests that there are parallels between cooperatively breeding fish's and humans' regulation of immigrants. The research was published today, 6 February 2013, in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The Princess of Lake Tanganyika...

Scientists Analyze Costs And Benefits Of Rock Dissolving Practices
2013-01-22 12:14:08

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Geoengineering is a controversial and illegal practice that attempts to mitigate the forces of climate change on a grand scale. Many see this attempt to alter global climate via artificial means as a ℠quick fix´ with potential long-term negative effects. However, despite the contentious nature of geoengineering, scientists from the Alfred Wegener Institute in Bremerhaven, Germany decided to analyze a ℠rock...

High-Tech Robotic Fish Glides Through Water With Great Ease
2013-01-17 12:54:52

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Scientists from the Michigan State University made a number of improvements on a high-tech robotic fish. The new fish, called Grace, was designed and built by Xiaobo Tan, an MSU associate professor of electrical and computer engineering, and his team. They equipped the new fish with an array of sensors, allowing it to travel autonomously through the water, as well as measure water temperature, quality and other pacts. These...

2013-01-14 10:30:20

Tiny coral reef wrasses can swim as fast as some of the swiftest fish in the ocean — but using only half as much energy to do so, Australian scientists working on the Great Barrier Reef have found. By flapping their fins in a figure-eight pattern, bluelined wrasses can travel at high speeds while using 40 per cent less energy than tunas of the same size. “For a long time, people thought the best high-speed swimmers were the fishes cruising in open waters, like mackerel and...

National Geographic Celebrates 125 Years Of Scientific Exploration
2013-01-12 10:21:34

Jedidiah Becker for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online This Sunday, The National Geographic Society will celebrate 125 years of intrepid exploration, pioneering science journalism and dazzling photography. If you´re like us, you can scarcely hear the name “National Geographic” without immediately calling to mind a vision of the magazine´s iconic yellow border framing some breathtaking image or hearing Elmer Bernstein´s rousing fanfare...


Latest Fisheries Reference Libraries

Crown Of Thorns Starfish, Acanthaster planci
2013-11-11 10:54:41

The crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci) is a species of starfish that is classified within the Acanthasteridae family. This species has a large range that extends from the Red Sea to the African coasts in the east and from the Indian Ocean to the western coasts of Central America. It prefers a habitat in coral reefs, which can be harmed if population numbers are too high. Damage occurs when filamentous algae covers bare skeletons of coral and the starfish move in to feed, stripping...

Bluefish, Pomatomus saltatrix
2013-10-22 10:54:52

The Bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) is the only living species of the family Pomatomidae. It is a marine pelagic fish that can be found around the world in temperate and subtropical waters, except for the northern Pacific Ocean. Bluefish are known as tailor in Australia, shad on the east coast of South Africa, and elf on the west coast. Other common names regarding this fish are blue, chopper, and anchoa. It is a good eating and game fish. The bluefish is moderately proportioned with a...

Lampert's Sea Cucumber, Synaptula lamperti
2013-04-30 15:18:06

Synaptula lamperti is a species of sea cucumber that can be found in the waters of the Indo-Pacific. Its range includes the coastal waters of Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Indonesia, and Micronesia. It does not have the tube feet, which are common to other species of sea cucumber, instead moving around by using a small grouping of pinnate feeding tentacles, which are always moving. It can also move by using the small, hook-like bones found along its body, attaching itself to the sea...

Mudflats
2013-04-19 21:07:34

Mudflats, or otherwise known as tidal flats, are coastal wetlands that form when mud is left behind by tides or rivers. They’re found in sheltered regions such as bayous, lagoons, estuaries, and bays. Mudflats might be seen geologically as exposed layers of bay mud, a result from the deposition of estuarine silts, marine animal detritus, and clays. The majority of the sediment in a mudflat is within the intertidal zone, therefore the flat is submerged and exposed about twice per day. In...

Kelp Forest
2013-04-19 19:29:03

Kelp forests are areas that are underwater with a high density of kelp. They’re recognized as one of the most dynamic and productive ecosystems on Earth. Smaller regions of anchored kelp are known as kelp beds. Kelp forests can be found worldwide throughout polar and temperate coastal oceans. In the year 2007, kelp forests were discovered in tropical waters near Ecuador as well. While they are physically formed by brown macroalgae of the order Laminariales, kelp forests offer a unique...

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Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.