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Latest Fisheries Stories

Tsunami Debris Could Harbor Invasive Species, Experts Warn
2012-06-08 05:45:18

While the 70-foot-long dock that washed ashore at an Oregon beach earlier this week may not be radioactively harmful or contain chemical contaminants, scientists are warning that it is likely home to a different sort of threat. The dock, which was dislodged from a fishing port in northern Japan by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, floated across the Pacific Ocean and arrived at Agate Beach, a mile north of Newport, on Tuesday. On Thursday, scientists at the Oregon State University (OSU)...

Scientists Use 'Lab-in-a-Box' To Study Coral Reefs
2012-06-08 05:04:39

In what is being called the first controlled ocean acidification experiment ever conducted in shallow coastal waters, an international team of experts has created a miniature laboratory in the Great Barrier Reef in order to simulate anticipated future conditions in the waters of the region's ecosystem. The researchers, including Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment Senior Fellows Jeff Koseff, Rob Dunbar and Steve Monismith, created a so-called "lab-in-a-box" in two to six foot deep...

2012-06-01 10:10:12

Major new marine herbivory study Coral reefs and seashores largely look the way they do because large fish and urchins eat most of the seaweed that might otherwise cover them, but a major new study has found that the greatest impact of all comes from an unexpected quarter — small marine snails. The study published in the journal Ecology Letters is the largest of its kind ever undertaken into the ecological impacts of marine grazing animals: it was led by Associate Professor...

2012-05-31 01:12:17

An international team of scientists has gathered the first conclusive evidence that marine reserves can help restock exploited fish populations on neighboring reefs which are open to both commercial and recreational fishing. The groundbreaking study was carried out in the Keppel Island group on Australia´s Great Barrier Reef by researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (CoECRS), in conjunction with other leading research institutions, and is reported in the...

California Bluefin Tuna Found Carrying Radiation From Japan's 2011 Fukushima Nuclear Disaster
2012-05-29 10:46:09

Low-level radiation has been found in populations of bluefin tuna off the coast of California, a new study has found, noting that the fish are carrying radioactive material from Japanese waters more than 6,000 miles away. Researchers have found “modestly elevated levels” of two radioactive isotopes in bluefin tuna caught off the coast of San Diego in August 2011. They said the tuna picked up the radiation by swimming and feeding in the waters off the coast of Japan where the...


Latest Fisheries Reference Libraries

Crown Of Thorns Starfish, Acanthaster planci
2013-11-11 10:54:41

The crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci) is a species of starfish that is classified within the Acanthasteridae family. This species has a large range that extends from the Red Sea to the African coasts in the east and from the Indian Ocean to the western coasts of Central America. It prefers a habitat in coral reefs, which can be harmed if population numbers are too high. Damage occurs when filamentous algae covers bare skeletons of coral and the starfish move in to feed, stripping...

Bluefish, Pomatomus saltatrix
2013-10-22 10:54:52

The Bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) is the only living species of the family Pomatomidae. It is a marine pelagic fish that can be found around the world in temperate and subtropical waters, except for the northern Pacific Ocean. Bluefish are known as tailor in Australia, shad on the east coast of South Africa, and elf on the west coast. Other common names regarding this fish are blue, chopper, and anchoa. It is a good eating and game fish. The bluefish is moderately proportioned with a...

Lampert's Sea Cucumber, Synaptula lamperti
2013-04-30 15:18:06

Synaptula lamperti is a species of sea cucumber that can be found in the waters of the Indo-Pacific. Its range includes the coastal waters of Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Indonesia, and Micronesia. It does not have the tube feet, which are common to other species of sea cucumber, instead moving around by using a small grouping of pinnate feeding tentacles, which are always moving. It can also move by using the small, hook-like bones found along its body, attaching itself to the sea...

Mudflats
2013-04-19 21:07:34

Mudflats, or otherwise known as tidal flats, are coastal wetlands that form when mud is left behind by tides or rivers. They’re found in sheltered regions such as bayous, lagoons, estuaries, and bays. Mudflats might be seen geologically as exposed layers of bay mud, a result from the deposition of estuarine silts, marine animal detritus, and clays. The majority of the sediment in a mudflat is within the intertidal zone, therefore the flat is submerged and exposed about twice per day. In...

Kelp Forest
2013-04-19 19:29:03

Kelp forests are areas that are underwater with a high density of kelp. They’re recognized as one of the most dynamic and productive ecosystems on Earth. Smaller regions of anchored kelp are known as kelp beds. Kelp forests can be found worldwide throughout polar and temperate coastal oceans. In the year 2007, kelp forests were discovered in tropical waters near Ecuador as well. While they are physically formed by brown macroalgae of the order Laminariales, kelp forests offer a unique...

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Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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