Quantcast

Latest Fisheries Stories

shutterstock_3223476
2012-07-11 14:42:36

John Neumann for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online There is a lichen named for President Obama and Elvis has a wasp species named after him. Now the world of celebrity species naming can add a parasitic blood-feeding crustacean to the list with Gnathia marleyi, named after reggae icon Bob Marley, reports Deborah Zabarenko for Reuters. “I named this species, which is truly a natural wonder, after Marley because of my respect and admiration for Marley´s music,” Paul...

We Can Still Save Our Reefs
2012-07-11 10:41:40

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online John Pandolfi, along with 81 nations and 500 million people, keep hopeful that the world´s coral reefs are not in a lot of trouble. The world-famous coral scientist, from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and University of Queensland, has traced the story of the world´s reefs over more than 50 million years and is translating delicate signals from the past to reveal what doomed them in previous...

shutterstock_77358073
2012-07-11 09:36:14

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The acid levels of the world's oceans are increasing far faster than scientists had expected, making it one of the biggest threats to coral reefs and threatening both food supplies and the tourism industry, the head of the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) told reporters Monday. Speaking with Kristen Gelineau of the Associated Press (AP), Jane Lubchenco, head of the American scientific organization, said...

Color Changes In Coral Reefs Due To Increased Growth
2012-07-10 21:21:09

New research has provided insight into the basic immune response and repair mechanisms of corals to disease and changing environmental conditions. The study, published in the latest issue of the journal Coral Reefs, found that increased growth is the underlying physiological process associated with disease, wounding and stress-related color changes in reef-building corals. The study investigated distinct green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like pigments responsible for the green, red and...

2012-07-10 10:34:54

Like their warrior ancestors, leaders of many Pacific Island nations have been making efforts to safeguard their countries, this time by sounding an alarm as the impact of climate change becomes more apparent.  Today their efforts received a big boost with the release of a Scientific Consensus Statement on Climate Change and Coral Reefs that is supported by over 2,600 scientists, showing the threats that reef corals are under across the globe and calling for governments worldwide to take...

2012-07-10 10:18:52

Marine scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have linked the decline in growth of Caribbean forereef corals – due to recent warming – to long-term trends in seawater temperature experienced by these corals located on the ocean-side of the reef. The research was conducted on the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System in southern Belize. The results were revealed online in the July 8 issue of Nature Climate Change, a journal that publishes research on the...

Climate Change Affected Coral Reefs In Ancient Times
2012-07-06 12:20:36

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Climate change has historically affected the growth of coral reefs, with some reefs experiencing a long-term growth stoppage around 4,000 years ago, according to newly published research in the journal Science. An international team of scientists, who used radiocarbon dating and other research techniques, said that the growth stoppage they identified in eastern Pacific reefs took 2,500 years to recover from. "We were shocked to find...

2012-07-04 22:50:14

Unfair and exploitative political agreements allow Europeans to eat fish from the plates of developing countries, according to a study led by University of British Columbia researchers. In the case of Madagascar, the European Union pays less than it did two decades ago while catching more fish. Since 1986, the EU´s quotas for catching fish in Madagascar´s waters have increased by 30 per cent while its access fees have decreased by 20 per cent. As a result, the total annual income...

2012-07-02 21:57:35

Some coral reef fish may be better prepared to cope with rising CO2 in the world´s oceans — thanks to their parents. Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (CoECRS) today reported in the journal Nature Climate Change, encouraging new findings that some fish may be less vulnerable to high CO2 and an acidifying ocean than previously feared. “There has been a lot of concern around the world about recent findings that baby fish are highly...


Latest Fisheries Reference Libraries

Crown Of Thorns Starfish, Acanthaster planci
2013-11-11 10:54:41

The crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci) is a species of starfish that is classified within the Acanthasteridae family. This species has a large range that extends from the Red Sea to the African coasts in the east and from the Indian Ocean to the western coasts of Central America. It prefers a habitat in coral reefs, which can be harmed if population numbers are too high. Damage occurs when filamentous algae covers bare skeletons of coral and the starfish move in to feed, stripping...

Bluefish, Pomatomus saltatrix
2013-10-22 10:54:52

The Bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) is the only living species of the family Pomatomidae. It is a marine pelagic fish that can be found around the world in temperate and subtropical waters, except for the northern Pacific Ocean. Bluefish are known as tailor in Australia, shad on the east coast of South Africa, and elf on the west coast. Other common names regarding this fish are blue, chopper, and anchoa. It is a good eating and game fish. The bluefish is moderately proportioned with a...

Lampert's Sea Cucumber, Synaptula lamperti
2013-04-30 15:18:06

Synaptula lamperti is a species of sea cucumber that can be found in the waters of the Indo-Pacific. Its range includes the coastal waters of Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Indonesia, and Micronesia. It does not have the tube feet, which are common to other species of sea cucumber, instead moving around by using a small grouping of pinnate feeding tentacles, which are always moving. It can also move by using the small, hook-like bones found along its body, attaching itself to the sea...

Mudflats
2013-04-19 21:07:34

Mudflats, or otherwise known as tidal flats, are coastal wetlands that form when mud is left behind by tides or rivers. They’re found in sheltered regions such as bayous, lagoons, estuaries, and bays. Mudflats might be seen geologically as exposed layers of bay mud, a result from the deposition of estuarine silts, marine animal detritus, and clays. The majority of the sediment in a mudflat is within the intertidal zone, therefore the flat is submerged and exposed about twice per day. In...

Kelp Forest
2013-04-19 19:29:03

Kelp forests are areas that are underwater with a high density of kelp. They’re recognized as one of the most dynamic and productive ecosystems on Earth. Smaller regions of anchored kelp are known as kelp beds. Kelp forests can be found worldwide throughout polar and temperate coastal oceans. In the year 2007, kelp forests were discovered in tropical waters near Ecuador as well. While they are physically formed by brown macroalgae of the order Laminariales, kelp forests offer a unique...

More Articles (20 articles) »
Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.