Quantcast

Latest Flagellum Stories

Bacteria Use Whole Body To Swim, Not Just Propellers
2014-07-23 03:59:24

Brown University When it comes to swimming, the bodies of some bacteria are more than just dead weight, according to new research from Brown University. Many bacteria swim using flagella, corkscrew-like appendages that push or pull bacterial cells like tiny propellers. It's long been assumed that the flagella do all the work during swimming, while the rest of the cell body is just along for the ride. But this new research shows that in at least one species, the cell body is actively...

Researchers Explain The Flagellar Synchronisation Of Swimming Algae
2013-10-25 14:14:45

Max Planck Institute The beating of flagella is one of the basic principles of movement in the cellular cosmos. However, up to now, scientists were unsure as to how the movements of several of these small cellular appendages are synchronized. Dresden-based researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics and the MPI for the Physics of Complex Systems have now succeeded in demonstrating how the green alga Chlamydomonas synchronizes the movements of its two...

Bacteria Swim With Help From High-angle Helix
2013-08-13 15:33:24

Brown University It’s counterintuitive but true: Some microorganisms that use flagella for locomotion are able to swim faster in gel-like fluids such as mucus. Research engineers at Brown University have figured out why. It's the angle of the coil that matters. Findings are reported in Physical Review Letters. A high-angle helix helps microorganisms like sperm and bacteria swim through mucus and other viscoelastic fluids, according to a new study by researchers from Brown University...

Bacteria Flagella Utilize Evolutionary Foible
2013-07-09 08:58:42

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Marine microbes change swimming directions with a sideways flick of their lone flagellum, a type of high-speed controlled failure first documented in 2011 as a unique swimming stroke but whose underlying mechanism had eluded researchers until now. Bacteria swim by rotating the helical, hair-like flagella that extend from their unicellular bodies. Some bacteria, such as the Escherichia coli (E. coli) living in the human gut, have...

Role That Flagellum Plays In Helping E. Coli Colonize Rough Surfaces Revealed
2013-04-11 13:06:15

Harvard University New research from Harvard University helps to explain how waterborne bacteria can colonize rough surfaces–even those that have been designed to resist water. A team of materials scientists and microbiologists studied the gut bacterium Escherichia coli, which has many flagella that stick out in all directions. The researchers found that these tails can act as biological grappling hooks, reaching far into nanoscale crevices and latching the bacteria in place....

2013-02-06 15:59:57

In their natural environment bacteria develop by forming communities of micro-organisms called biofilms that afford them greater resistance. These biofilms on farms and premises where food is processed lead to considerable economic losses besides being a potential source of contamination and transmission of the pathogen. In her PhD thesis,VioletaZorraquino-Salvo has studied a specific protein type that activates the formation of biofilm in Salmonella and regulates bacterial...

2012-02-17 00:32:46

Team develops first 3D look at interaction between immune sensor and protein that helps bacteria move To invade organisms such as humans, bacteria make use of a protein called flagellin, part of a tail-like appendage that helps the bacteria move about. Now, for the first time, a team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute has determined the 3D structure of the interaction between this critical bacterial protein and an immune...

2011-12-01 11:29:07

Understanding mechanism may aid in development of infection-fighting drugs In the human world of manufacturing, many companies are now applying an on-demand, just-in-time strategy to conserve resources, reduce costs and promote production of goods precisely when and where they are most needed. A recent study from Indiana University Bloomington scientists reveals that bacteria have evolved a similar just-in-time strategy to constrain production of an extremely sticky cement to exactly the...

2011-10-14 10:05:05

An international team of researchers has invented new artificial muscles strong enough to rotate objects a thousand times their own weight, but with the same flexibility of an elephant´s trunk or octopus limbs. In a paper published online today on Science Express, the scientists and engineers from the University of British Columbia, the University of Wollongong in Australia, the University of Texas at Dallas and Hanyang University in Korea detail their innovation. The study elaborates...

2010-12-13 14:54:23

Research presented at American Society of Cell Biology's 50th annual meeting in Philadelphia Long considered a freewheeling loner, the Trypanosoma brucei parasite responsible for African sleeping sickness has revealed a totally unexpected social side, opening a potential chink in the behavioral armor of this and other supposedly solitary human parasites, according to research presented at the American Society for Cell Biology's 50th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia. "The concept of bacteria...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
Related