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Flightless birds Reference Libraries

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Royal Penguin
2006-02-20 10:58:19

The Royal Penguin (Eudyptes schlegeli) inhabits the waters surrounding Antarctica. They closely resemble Macaroni Penguins, but instead have a white face and chin instead of the Macaronis' black face. They stand up to 70 cm tall and weigh between 4 and 5 kg. Royal penguins breed only on Macquarie Island and, like other penguins, spend much of their time at sea, where they are thought to be...

Snares Penguin
2006-02-20 10:50:24

The Snares Penguin (Eudyptes robustus) is a penguin that can be found in New Zealand. It is also known as the Snares Crested Penguin and the Snares Islands Penguin. It breeds on The Snares, a group of islands off the southern coast of the South Island. This is a medium-sized, yellow-crested penguin grows to approximately 60cm. It has dark blue-black upperparts and white underparts. It has a...

Fiordland Penguin
2006-02-20 10:42:27

The Fiordland Penguin (Eudyptes pachyrhynchus) is a penguin found in New Zealand. It breeds along the coast and on islands off the Fiordland coast (i.e. south-west of the South Island) as well as on Stewart Island/Rakiura. This is a medium-sized, yellow-crested, black-and-white penguin which can grow up to approximately 60cm. It has dark, bluish-grey upperparts with a darker head, and white...

Rockhopper Penguin
2006-02-20 10:34:30

The Rockhopper Penguin (Eudyptes chrysocome) is a species of penguin which is closely related to the Macaroni Penguin (Eudyptes chrysolophus). The Rockhopper is the smallest yellow-crested, black-and-white penguin, reaching a length of 55cm. Its upperparts are slate-grey and a straight, bright yellow eyebrow ending in long yellowish plumes projecting sideways behind a red eye. This penguin...

Chinstrap Penguin
2006-02-20 10:24:52

The Chinstrap Penguin (Pygoscelis antarctica) is a species of penguin which can be found in the South Sandwich Islands, Antarctica, the South Orkneys, South Shetland, South Georgia, Bouvet Island, Balleny and Peter I Island. The name derives from the thin black band under their heads. This band makes it appear as if they are wearing black helmets, making them one of the most easily identified...

Adelie Penguin
2006-02-17 17:42:07

The Adelie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) is, along with the Emperor Penguin, one of the only two types of penguin living on the mainland of Antarctica. It is named after French explorer Dumont d'Urville's wife, Adelie. They form large colonies on the coasts of the mainland as well as on some nearby islands. There is one colony on Ross Island that consists of approximately half a million Adelie...

Gentoo Penguin
2006-02-17 17:23:31

The Gentoo Penguin (Pygoscelis papua) is easily identifiable by the wide white stripe extending like a bonnet across the top of its head. Chicks have grey backs with white fronts. Adult Gentoos reach a height of 75 to 90 cm. They are considered to be the fastest underwater swimming penguins and can reach speeds of up to 36 km/h. Two sub-species of this penguin are recognized Pygoscelis...

Emperor Penguin
2006-02-17 17:13:48

The Emperor Penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) is the largest of all penguins and is the only penguin that breeds at the height of winter in Antarctica. Emperor Penguins eat mainly crustaceans (such as krill) but will also occasionally indulge in small fish and squid. In the wild, Emperor Penguins typically live for 20 years, but some records indicate a maximum lifespan of around 40 years. (The...

King Penguin
2006-02-17 16:48:15

The King Penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) is the second largest species of penguin. At about 3 ft (900 mm) tall and weighing 24 to 33 lb (11 to 15 kg), it is second only to the Emperor Penguin in size and weight. Currently there is a world population of roughly four million King Penguins, which are divided into two subspecies (A. p. patagonicus and A. p. halli). King penguins have a diet...

Penguin
2006-02-17 16:02:43

Penguins (order Sphenisciformes, family Spheniscidae) are flightless birds found in the southern hemisphere. Species and habitats There are 17 to 18 species known worldwide, depending on whether the two Eudyptula species are counted as distinct. Even though all penguin species are native to the southern hemisphere, they are not found only in cold climates, such as Antarctica. In fact,...

Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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