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2009-03-02 10:41:55

A U.S.-led study warns the South Asian summer monsoon season, critical to agriculture in Bangladesh, India, Nepal and Pakistan, might become weaker. Experts at the Purdue University Climate Change Research Center say climate change could influence monsoon dynamics and cause less summer precipitation, a delay in the start of monsoon season and longer breaks between the rainy periods. Associate Professor Noah Diffenbaugh, whose research group led the study, said the summer monsoon affects water...

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2009-03-01 11:17:13

The South Asian summer monsoon - critical to agriculture in Bangladesh, India, Nepal and Pakistan - could be weakened and delayed due to rising temperatures in the future, according to a recent climate modeling study. A Purdue University research group found that climate change could influence monsoon dynamics and cause less summer precipitation, a delay in the start of monsoon season and longer breaks between the rainy periods. Noah Diffenbaugh, whose research group led the study, said the...

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2009-02-04 15:23:03

Crocodiles were washed onto the streets after floods ravaged northern Australia, authorities said in a warning to residents Wednesday. Over 60 percent of the northeastern state of Queensland has been declared a disaster zone, and close to 3,000 homes have been affected by flooding after two recent cyclones, according to authorities. Army troops have been called in to help with rescue, while three reports of large crocodiles washed up from flooded rivers have come in from homes in the Gulf of...

2009-02-03 09:33:53

The Monsoon and Environment Research Group of Peking University submitted a report to Chinese Science Bulletin, recently, showed that regional summer monsoon rainfall in China can be predicted by 1-2 seasons ahead by using the signals of the sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) and the subsurface temperature anomaly (STA) in the central equatorial Pacific (CEP). Several new facts have been revealed as follows.(1)    The strongest center of SSTA along the equatorial Pacific...

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2009-01-17 14:05:00

The Environmental Protection Agency said on Friday rising seal levels on the United States' mid-Atlantic coast are happening faster than the global average because of global warming.The continued rise is threatening the future of coastal communities.The EPA released a report detailing coastal waters from New York to North Carolina have crept up by an average of 0.09 to 0.17 inches a year, compared with an average global increase of 0.07 inches a year.The report was commissioned by the Climate...

2009-01-12 06:00:00

WASHINGTON, Jan. 12 /PRNewswire/ -- Heavy seasonal rain and recent wildfire damage can make for a disastrous combination. Winter Rainy Season in the Northwestern United States brings intense winter storms and the majority of annual precipitation to the region. In addition, widespread wildfires this past year have burned more than 1.6 million acres of land in California, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon and Washington. Wildfires leave the ground charred, barren and unable to absorb water. This...

2009-01-08 16:20:00

Flooding like that which devastated the North of England last year is set to become a common event across the UK in the next 75 years, new research has shown.A study by Dr Hayley Fowler, of Newcastle University, predicts that severe storms "“ the likes of which currently occur every five to 25 years across the UK "“ will become more common and more severe in a matter of decades.Looking at "Ëœextreme rainfall events' "“ where rain falls steadily and heavily for...

2009-01-08 11:15:00

When extremes of drought and flood come in rapid succession, the extent of damage to vegetation may depend in part on the sequence of those events, according to a new study published in The American Naturalist.The study, which focused on tree species common to the Everglades in Florida, found that seedlings maintained higher growth rates and were less likely to die when subjected to drought first then flood, rather than vice versa. The findings could have significant implications for...

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2008-11-21 11:10:11

Flash floods are the most common natural disaster in the United States, and because of their unpredictability they're the leading weather-related cause of death for Americans. They usually arrive with little or no warning, but a Tel Aviv University researcher is trying to predict where and when they will occur "• using lightning. Prof. Colin Price, coordinator of the international "Flash Project" and head of the Geophysics and Planetary Physics Department at Tel Aviv University, is...

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2008-11-11 10:15:00

Data from seafloor drilling in South China Sea establish new record Throughout history, the changing fortunes of human societies in Asia have been linked to variations in the precipitation resulting from seasonal monsoons. A new paper published online this week in the journal Nature Geoscience suggests that variations in monsoon climate over longer time scales also influenced the evolution of the Himalaya mountain chain, the world's highest. The climate over much of Asia is dominated by...


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Post Weather Report From August 2, 2012
2012-08-03 11:43:48

Four major events occurred yesterday, the first being the formation of Tropical Storm Ernesto, which is now located just east of the Windward Islands with winds near 45 knots. The second was the heat in the Southern Plains as many places saw temps over 100F with heat index values near 105-110 for the region. High temperatures are again one of the main story makers across the country. 100 degree temperatures continue to plague Texas and Oklahoma. Eleven out of the last 14 days in...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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