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Latest Flora of North America Stories

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2010-03-25 08:48:29

Some birds are not "bird brains" when it comes to nutrition. Scientists reported yesterday for the first time that certain birds eat berries that are high in antioxidants during their annual migration, passing up berries that are lower in these healthful substances. The behavior may help improve the birds' fitness for a long, stressful journey, they reported at the American Chemical Society (ACS) 239th National Meeting. "We know that a diet rich in antioxidants, like those found in fruits and...

2010-01-21 21:03:00

ATHENS, Ga., Jan. 21 /PRNewswire/ -- Turbulent times characterized by plummeting pine sawtimber prices could soon be over for timber sellers. A new stumpage price forecast published by Forisk signals climbing prices for pine sawtimber in the US South beginning in 2010. The ForiskFORECAST pine sawtimber price forecast and "Forecasting Timber Prices" workshop provide insights for timberland owners, investors, and wood procurement managers in planning future pricing and management strategies...

2009-11-20 13:43:00

MARICOPA, Ariz., Nov. 20 /PRNewswire/ -- The Arizona Technology Council presented Yulex Corporation with the Green Innovator of the Year award at the Governor's Celebration of Innovation gala Nov. 19 in Phoenix. The award, given each year to an Arizona-based company in the technology industry, recognizes the scientific advancements Yulex has achieved and its commitment to providing environmentally supportive and sustainable products. Yulex Corporation has made its headquarters in the...

2009-09-23 13:45:00

The American chestnut was a dominant species in eastern U.S.'s forests before a blight wiped it out in the early 1900s. Today it's being returned to the landscape thanks in part to work by a University of Tennessee Forestry alumna and the UT Tree Improvement Program (UT TIP). Once used extensively for building, for tanning leather, as an important source of food for humans and wildlife, and even as nutritious fodder for hogs, the American chestnut seemed destined to be a memory"”a line...

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2009-09-05 14:16:12

Mayapple shows potential as cash crop in US A common weed called American mayapple may soon offer an alternative to an Asian cousin that's been harvested almost to extinction because of its anti-cancer properties. The near-extinct Asian plant, Podophyllyum emodi, produces podophyllotoxin, a compound used in manufacturing etoposide, the active ingredient in a drug used for treating lung and testicular cancer. Podophyllyum emodi is a cousin of the common mayapple weed found in the United...

2009-09-01 08:07:12

The U.S. state of Maine has developed an early-warning system to spot infestations of the emerald ash borer beetle, scientists say. Because the invasive beetles are nearly impossible to detect in trees before it is too late, the Maine state forest service has launched an effort in which thousands of volunteers with nets are catching wasps who may be carrying captured ash borer larvae back to their young, The Boston Globe reported. Forest Service entomologist Colleen Teerling told the...

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2009-06-20 08:22:43

"To thine own self be true" may take on a new meaning"”not with people or animal behavior but with plant behavior. Plants engage in self-recognition and can communicate danger to their "clones" or genetically identical cuttings planted nearby, says professor Richard Karban of the Department of Entomology, University of California, Davis, in groundbreaking research published in the current edition of Ecology Letters. Karban and fellow scientist Kaori Shiojiri of the Center for Ecological...

2009-05-05 07:00:00

Results of a Randomized Study Presented at ACOG 2009 Annual Meeting Confirming Teschke's Re-evaluation of Spontaneous Reports CHICAGO, May 5 /PRNewswire/ -- Black cohosh has been widely used in Europe and also in North America to treat menopausal symptoms including hot flashes, night sweats, occasional irritability and mood swings. While extensive research has been published on this botanical, the question of liver safety has arisen in a few isolated cases. Now, with the recent publication...

2008-12-12 20:09:47

An Indiana woman is blaming a hardworking chipmunk for filling the engine compartment of her car with black walnuts. Hope Wideup of DeMotte said she connected the damage to the chipmunk after a garden glove she had seen it steal from her yard turned up under the hood of her car before the destructive cache of walnuts, the Gary (Ind.) Post-Tribune reported Friday. She said the mess and damage caused by the walnuts cost $242.08 to clean and repair, Apparently this little guy stuffed a bunch...

2008-09-30 06:00:20

By Keith Rogers By KEITH ROGERS REVIEW-JOURNAL With 70,000 to 80,000 sage grouse scampering through thickets of high desert shrubs in Nevada, a casual observer might think the chickenlike bird is hardly a candidate for listing as a threatened or endangered species. The Nevada Department of Wildlife estimates, however, are down this year from 100,000 grouse in 2005, and the ratio of chicks to hens is the lowest recorded since the early 1980s. That gives weight to arguments by...


Latest Flora of North America Reference Libraries

Monterey Pine, Pinus radiata
2014-04-27 08:44:45

Monterey Pine (Pinus radiata) is native to the Central coast of California and Mexico primarily the Guadalupe and Cedros Islands. The Monterey pine is planted extensively in Australia, New Zealand, Spain, Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, Kenya, and South Africa. The Monterey pine is closely related to the Bishop and Knobcone pine. The Monterey pine is a short to medium tree growing from 49-98 feet tall with some growing to 200 feet tall in perfect growing conditions. The crown is rounded with...

Knobcone Pine Cone, Pinus attenuata
2014-04-27 07:44:40

Knobcone pine (Pinus attenuata) grows in the mountains of southern Oregon to Baja California. This tree is usually found in pure stands but can mix in with the Bishop pine and the Monterey pine along the Oregon-California coastline. This tree grows in shallow rocky infertile soil. The knobcone pine is a relatively short lived tree living 75-100 years. The Knobcone pine grows at sea level up to 5500 feet in elevation and is a short to medium tree growing to heights of 26-79 feet with a...

Jeffrey Pine, Pinus jeffreyi
2014-04-27 07:31:31

Jeffrey pine (Pinus jeffreyi) grows in California, Nevada, and Oregon. This tree is named after botanist document, John Jeffrey. This tree is also known as the black pine. The Jeffrey pine is often confused with the Ponderosa pine. Jeffrey pine grows in high altitudes of 4900-6900 feet in the northern part of its region and 5900-9500 feet in the southern range. The trees grow primarily from southwest Oregon, through much of California, south to the northern border of Mexico. The range of...

Hartweg’s Pine, Pinus hartwegii
2014-04-22 13:27:36

Hartweg’s pine (Pinus hartwegii) is found growing in the mountains of  Mexico and Central America east to Honduras. This tree was discovered and named in 1838 by Karl Hartweg. The Hartweg’s pine is related to the Pinus Montezuma species which has shorter needles, as well as smaller cones and grows at lower altitudes. The Hartweg Pine grows at altitudes of 8200-14100 feet above sea level forming the alpine tree line in the higher mountains of Mexico. This pine tolerates dry winters,...

Arizona Pine, Pinus arizonica
2014-04-18 10:05:00

Arizona pine (Pinus arizonica) is found in the United States in northern Mexico, southeast Arizona, southwest New Mexico, and western Texas. The Arizona pine closely resembles the Ponderosa Pine found growing in the Sierra Madre Occidental in Arizona south to Durango, CO. The Arizona pine grows in high elevations from 5906-8038 feet. It is a medium to tall pine growing to heights of 82-114.8 feet tall with a trunk diameter of up to 3 feet 11 inches. The bark on young trees is dark brown...

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Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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