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Latest Flora of North America Stories

2008-09-21 09:00:17

By ERIC FEBER By Eric Feber The Virginian-Pilot The state's Department of Forestry is asking residents to get a little squirrelly. They want you to round up as many nuts as you can. And that doesn't mean you should turn in spooky ol' Uncle Elmo or your weird cousin Harold, the Virginia Department of Forestry (D.O.F.) simply needs help collecting "tree nuts," better known as acorns. As part of its year-round "Going Native" volunteer project, the D.O.F is calling on residents to help...

2008-07-24 09:00:41

By Ray Grass Deseret News For years now, the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources has been working with private landowners to help improve feeding opportunities for deer, elk and cattle. On Monday, roughly 300 acres of mountain sagebrush on private land adjacent to Hardware Ranch in Cache County was treated with an herbicide called Spike. The end result will be a thinning of the sagebrush and a rapid growth of tasty grasses and forbs, primary food sources for both wild and domestic...

2008-07-22 00:00:25

By > JOSH SISKIN I would like some advice on what kind of tree I should plant in my front yard for shade. I live in Mira Loma (Riverside County), where it is very hot in the summer and cold and windy in the winter months. I would like something fast-growing and preferably evergreen that would not hurt my plumbing. One last thing: My yard is small, so the tree should not be too large. >Rachelle Romero, Mira Loma Most evergreen trees are not known for producing shade. Exceptions...

2008-07-21 15:00:35

By Beth Partin When it comes to noxious weeds, Colorado, like many other states, suffers from an embarrassment of riches. Take myrtle spurge. It seemed perfect for a dryland garden, resembling nothing so much as a yellow-flowered sedum. But this xeriscape favorite has invaded sunny, dry areas in the foothills, where it carpets slopes and crowds out native vegetation. Despite its good looks, it's on List A under the Colorado Noxious Weed Act, which means that by law it must be...

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2008-04-11 09:25:00

Conservation group WildEarth Guardians formally petitioned the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Thursday in hopes that the government agency will offer express protection of an endangered lizard found in New Mexico and Texas.The sand dune lizard has been on the Fish and Wildflife Service's list of potential candidates since 2001. In 1997, researchers at the University of New Mexico wrote that it might be too late to prevent the lizard's extinctionWildEarth spokespersons said they want to see...

2007-09-25 18:00:27

U.S. researchers travel to Canada next spring to study simulated global warming involving about 2,000 sugar maple tree seedlings. Northern Illinois University Professors Lesley Rigg and David Goldblum have been awarded a $260,000 National Science Foundation grant to simulate global warming on sugar maple seedlings now growing in Canada's Lake Superior Provincial Park. The researchers will build rain-exclusion, temperature-controlled structures over the seedlings to simulate temperature...

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2007-03-21 15:46:43

DES MOINES, Iowa -- A new species of North American bamboo was recently discovered by Iowa State University and University of North Carolina botanists, making it the third known native species of the hardy grass in the United States. The "hill cane" was discovered in the Appalachian Mountains. It's different from the other two native species of bamboo, which were discovered more than 200 years ago, because it drops its leaves in the fall. "We tend to think that we ... know our own...

2006-07-18 07:13:54

LONDON (Reuters) - Black cohosh, a herb popular for relieving hot flashes and other symptoms of menopause, may be linked with liver damage and products containing it will in future carry a warning, Britain's drug regulator said on Tuesday. The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) said a review of all available data had concluded that liver injury resulting from black cohosh was rare but could be serious. "In the light of this advice, the MHRA is working with...

2006-05-05 10:33:39

By Anne Harding NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Some products now sold in the US as black cohosh don't contain the popular herbal medicine at all, a new study shows. The herb has been used for several decades in Europe and North America to treat menopausal symptoms and some clinical trials have suggested it can indeed help treat hot flashes. Black cohosh is becoming scarce in the wild, raising the possibility that manufacturers may turn to related Actaea species that are cultivated in...

2006-01-17 07:37:45

GRANGEVILLE, Idaho -- Northwest loggers are worried British Columbia may be forced to harvest as much as 21 million acres of forests to stop the mountain pine beetle, flooding the market and driving down timber prices. The infected forests in British Columbia make up an area roughly 40 percent the size of Idaho. To combat the beetles, the province is increasing allowable timber cuts 78 percent; big trouble for mills throughout the Northwest. "They're going to bury us in the sand," said Dick...


Latest Flora of North America Reference Libraries

Monterey Pine, Pinus radiata
2014-04-27 08:44:45

Monterey Pine (Pinus radiata) is native to the Central coast of California and Mexico primarily the Guadalupe and Cedros Islands. The Monterey pine is planted extensively in Australia, New Zealand, Spain, Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, Kenya, and South Africa. The Monterey pine is closely related to the Bishop and Knobcone pine. The Monterey pine is a short to medium tree growing from 49-98 feet tall with some growing to 200 feet tall in perfect growing conditions. The crown is rounded with...

Knobcone Pine Cone, Pinus attenuata
2014-04-27 07:44:40

Knobcone pine (Pinus attenuata) grows in the mountains of southern Oregon to Baja California. This tree is usually found in pure stands but can mix in with the Bishop pine and the Monterey pine along the Oregon-California coastline. This tree grows in shallow rocky infertile soil. The knobcone pine is a relatively short lived tree living 75-100 years. The Knobcone pine grows at sea level up to 5500 feet in elevation and is a short to medium tree growing to heights of 26-79 feet with a...

Jeffrey Pine, Pinus jeffreyi
2014-04-27 07:31:31

Jeffrey pine (Pinus jeffreyi) grows in California, Nevada, and Oregon. This tree is named after botanist document, John Jeffrey. This tree is also known as the black pine. The Jeffrey pine is often confused with the Ponderosa pine. Jeffrey pine grows in high altitudes of 4900-6900 feet in the northern part of its region and 5900-9500 feet in the southern range. The trees grow primarily from southwest Oregon, through much of California, south to the northern border of Mexico. The range of...

Hartweg’s Pine, Pinus hartwegii
2014-04-22 13:27:36

Hartweg’s pine (Pinus hartwegii) is found growing in the mountains of  Mexico and Central America east to Honduras. This tree was discovered and named in 1838 by Karl Hartweg. The Hartweg’s pine is related to the Pinus Montezuma species which has shorter needles, as well as smaller cones and grows at lower altitudes. The Hartweg Pine grows at altitudes of 8200-14100 feet above sea level forming the alpine tree line in the higher mountains of Mexico. This pine tolerates dry winters,...

Arizona Pine, Pinus arizonica
2014-04-18 10:05:00

Arizona pine (Pinus arizonica) is found in the United States in northern Mexico, southeast Arizona, southwest New Mexico, and western Texas. The Arizona pine closely resembles the Ponderosa Pine found growing in the Sierra Madre Occidental in Arizona south to Durango, CO. The Arizona pine grows in high elevations from 5906-8038 feet. It is a medium to tall pine growing to heights of 82-114.8 feet tall with a trunk diameter of up to 3 feet 11 inches. The bark on young trees is dark brown...

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Word of the Day
mundungus
  • A stinking tobacco.
  • Offal; waste animal product; organic matter unfit for consumption.
This word comes from the Spanish 'mondongo,' tripe, entrails.