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Latest Flora of the United States Stories

2010-06-09 13:20:59

Proper and timely burning of some Eastern U.S. forests could help revitalize flowering dogwood trees, which benefits a wide range of species, a Purdue University report shows. Dogwood trees act as a calcium pump, pulling the nutrient from deep in the soil and depositing it on the forest floor with their fallen leaves each autumn. It's an important source of nutrition for a variety of species in a forest ecosystem, said Michael Jenkins, assistant professor of forestry and natural resources....

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2010-04-05 06:30:00

What happens to the soil when you remove the plants? Crop residues, perennial warm season grasses, and short-rotation woody crops are potential biomass sources for cellulosic ethanol production. While most research is focused on the conversion of cellulosic feedstocks into ethanol and increasing production of biomass, the impacts of growing energy crops and the removal of crop residue on soil and environmental quality have received less attention. Moreover, effects of crop residue removal on...

2010-03-12 12:59:00

EDF, Ranchers Praise Plan to Focus Conservation Programs on Species Recovery WASHINGTON, March 12 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Conservation and rancher groups say a special initiative announced today by USDA's National Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) could help recover the greater sage-grouse. The initiative is designed to focus resources from two voluntary federal conservation programs NRCS administers: the Environmental Quality Incentives Program and Wildlife Habitat Incentive...

2010-01-21 21:03:00

ATHENS, Ga., Jan. 21 /PRNewswire/ -- Turbulent times characterized by plummeting pine sawtimber prices could soon be over for timber sellers. A new stumpage price forecast published by Forisk signals climbing prices for pine sawtimber in the US South beginning in 2010. The ForiskFORECAST pine sawtimber price forecast and "Forecasting Timber Prices" workshop provide insights for timberland owners, investors, and wood procurement managers in planning future pricing and management strategies...

2009-11-24 07:00:00

THOUSAND OAKS, Calif., Nov. 24 /PRNewswire/ -- Energy crop company Ceres, Inc. announced today that it is working with CHOREN, an international leader in Biomass to Liquids technology, to optimize energy crops for thermochemical conversion to advanced low-carbon biofuels. The two-year bioenergy project is funded in part by a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. The thermochemical process does not require enzymes or microorganisms; instead, the biomass is gasified under certain heat...

2009-11-23 11:13:37

Biomass feedstock nitrogen study compares four grasses; switchgrass is most efficient. A USDOE and USDA study concluded that 50 million U.S. acres of cropland, idle cropland, and cropland pasture could be converted from current uses to the production of perennial grasses, such as switchgrass, from which biomass could be harvested for use as a biofuel feedstock. Economically viable production of a perennial grass monoculture from which substantial quantities of biomass are removed annually is...

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2009-11-17 05:55:00

Ancient high-altitude trees grow faster as temperatures rise Increasing temperatures at high altitudes are fueling the post-1950 growth spurt seen in bristlecone pines, the world's oldest trees, according to new research. Pines close to treeline have wider annual growth rings for the period from 1951 to 2000 than for the previous 3,700 years, reports a University of Arizona-led research team. Regional temperatures have increased, particularly at high elevations, during the same 50-year...

2009-11-10 07:00:00

THOUSAND OAKS, Calif., Nov. 10 /PRNewswire/ -- Energy crop company Ceres, Inc. announced today that it plans to expand an advanced trait development project to increase biomass yields of several energy grasses by as much as 40% in coming years, while simultaneously decreasing the use of inputs such as nitrogen fertilizers. The project, which was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) from among 3,700 renewable energy proposals, will be funded in part by a $5 million advanced...

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2009-10-02 11:25:22

Using prairie plants to produce bio-energy would help bird populations threatened by the conversion of grasslands to corn, scientists in Michigan said. There are ways to grow biofuel that are more benign, David Flaspohler, an environmental scientist at Michigan Tech, said in the journal BioScience. The demand for ethanol from corn is converting land on a scale not seen since virgin prairies were plowed and huge swaths of the nation's forests were first cut to grow food crops, Flaspohler said...

2009-09-29 06:45:00

WHEATON, Ill., Sept. 29 /PRNewswire/ -- "The Golden Aspen" (published by AuthorHouse), the charming new children's book by Cheryl A. Price, follows the life of a small tree nestled within the Colorado Rockies, and its struggle to be accepted by the other trees in the mountains. The small tree's tale is chronicled through Price's whimsical prose and captured visually with lively, colorful illustrations. The small tree stood three feet tall, towered over by the taller cedars and...


Latest Flora of the United States Reference Libraries

Virginia Pine, Pinus virginiana, pollen cones
2014-05-19 09:44:09

Virginia pine (Pinus virginiana) grows in southern New York from Long Island and continues through the Appalachian Mountains to western Tennessee and Alabamain elevations as high as 2953 feet. This tree is also known as the scrub pine, spruce pine, or Jersey pine. The Harvard Arboretum in Boston, MA has cultivated Virginia pine on display. The Virginia pine is a medium sized tree growing from 29.5 – 59 feet tall with some getting as tall as 105 feet in perfect conditions. This tree grows...

Ponderosa Pine, Pinus ponderosa
2014-05-16 11:05:52

Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) is native to western North America in sixteen states as well as southern British Columbia, Canada. This tree is also known as the bull pine, blackjack pine, or western pitch, red and yellow pine, as well as Yosemite pine. The Ponderosa pine grows at sea level up to 9843 feet above sea level and can live 300-600 years. This pine is one of the largest pine trees growing to heights of 235 feet and can achieve a trunk diameter of 324 inches. The bark of mature...

Pond Pine, Pinus serotina
2014-05-16 10:40:26

Pond Pine (Pinus serotina) grows in the United States along the Atlantic coast from southern New Jersey south to Florida then west to southern Alabama. This pine grows in wet ground near ponds, and swamps and is also known as the marsh pine or pocosin pine. The pond pine is a small tree growing to heights of 82 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.6 feet. The tree tends to grow crooked and has several tops at the crown. The bark is scaly and reddish brown in color. The needles grow in bundles...

Lodgepole Pine, Pinus contorta
2014-04-27 08:06:16

Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) is found in western North America in the upper mountains and subalpine regions of Colorado’s northern Rocky Mountains. This tree is considered to be invasive in New Zealand. This tree is also known as the shore pine, twisted pine, and contorta pine as well as black pine, scrub pine, and coast pine. The Lodgepole pine grows best between 8000 and 10,000 feet above sea level. They like to grow in well-drained, slightly acidic, sandy soils on gentle south...

Knobcone Pine Cone, Pinus attenuata
2014-04-27 07:44:40

Knobcone pine (Pinus attenuata) grows in the mountains of southern Oregon to Baja California. This tree is usually found in pure stands but can mix in with the Bishop pine and the Monterey pine along the Oregon-California coastline. This tree grows in shallow rocky infertile soil. The knobcone pine is a relatively short lived tree living 75-100 years. The Knobcone pine grows at sea level up to 5500 feet in elevation and is a short to medium tree growing to heights of 26-79 feet with a...

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Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.