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Latest Flora of the United States Stories

2009-11-10 07:00:00

THOUSAND OAKS, Calif., Nov. 10 /PRNewswire/ -- Energy crop company Ceres, Inc. announced today that it plans to expand an advanced trait development project to increase biomass yields of several energy grasses by as much as 40% in coming years, while simultaneously decreasing the use of inputs such as nitrogen fertilizers. The project, which was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) from among 3,700 renewable energy proposals, will be funded in part by a $5 million advanced...

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2009-10-02 11:25:22

Using prairie plants to produce bio-energy would help bird populations threatened by the conversion of grasslands to corn, scientists in Michigan said. There are ways to grow biofuel that are more benign, David Flaspohler, an environmental scientist at Michigan Tech, said in the journal BioScience. The demand for ethanol from corn is converting land on a scale not seen since virgin prairies were plowed and huge swaths of the nation's forests were first cut to grow food crops, Flaspohler said...

2009-09-29 06:45:00

WHEATON, Ill., Sept. 29 /PRNewswire/ -- "The Golden Aspen" (published by AuthorHouse), the charming new children's book by Cheryl A. Price, follows the life of a small tree nestled within the Colorado Rockies, and its struggle to be accepted by the other trees in the mountains. The small tree's tale is chronicled through Price's whimsical prose and captured visually with lively, colorful illustrations. The small tree stood three feet tall, towered over by the taller cedars and...

2009-09-23 13:45:00

The American chestnut was a dominant species in eastern U.S.'s forests before a blight wiped it out in the early 1900s. Today it's being returned to the landscape thanks in part to work by a University of Tennessee Forestry alumna and the UT Tree Improvement Program (UT TIP). Once used extensively for building, for tanning leather, as an important source of food for humans and wildlife, and even as nutritious fodder for hogs, the American chestnut seemed destined to be a memory"”a line...

2009-09-01 08:07:12

The U.S. state of Maine has developed an early-warning system to spot infestations of the emerald ash borer beetle, scientists say. Because the invasive beetles are nearly impossible to detect in trees before it is too late, the Maine state forest service has launched an effort in which thousands of volunteers with nets are catching wasps who may be carrying captured ash borer larvae back to their young, The Boston Globe reported. Forest Service entomologist Colleen Teerling told the...

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2009-06-20 08:22:43

"To thine own self be true" may take on a new meaning"”not with people or animal behavior but with plant behavior. Plants engage in self-recognition and can communicate danger to their "clones" or genetically identical cuttings planted nearby, says professor Richard Karban of the Department of Entomology, University of California, Davis, in groundbreaking research published in the current edition of Ecology Letters. Karban and fellow scientist Kaori Shiojiri of the Center for Ecological...

2009-05-18 09:24:18

The answer to the looming fuel crisis in the 21st century may be found by thinking small, microscopic in fact. Microscopic organisms from bacteria and cyanobacteria, to fungi and microalgae, are biological factories that are proving to be efficient sources of inexpensive, environmentally friendly biofuels that can serve as alternatives to oil, according to research presented at the 109th General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology."We have been charged to develop the next...

2009-05-13 08:13:01

Acquiring cheap genome sequence data can improve the quality of feedstocks used to create biofuels, according to a new study published in The Plant Genome. With the costs of genome sequencing rapidly decreasing, and with the infrastructure now developed for almost anyone with access to a computer to cheaply store, access, and analyze sequence information, emphasis is increasingly being placed on ways to apply genome data to real world problems, including reducing dependency on fossil fuel....

2009-04-06 07:30:00

Role as Resource Supplier to Biofuels Market Part of Growth Strategy in Alternative Energy PASADENA, Calif., April 6 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- VIASPACE Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: VSPC), an alternative energy company providing products and technology for renewable and clean energy, today announced plans to expand production of its proprietary grass feedstock that is targeted for use in the production of low-carbon biofuels, including cellulosic ethanol, methanol and "green" gasoline....

2008-12-12 20:09:47

An Indiana woman is blaming a hardworking chipmunk for filling the engine compartment of her car with black walnuts. Hope Wideup of DeMotte said she connected the damage to the chipmunk after a garden glove she had seen it steal from her yard turned up under the hood of her car before the destructive cache of walnuts, the Gary (Ind.) Post-Tribune reported Friday. She said the mess and damage caused by the walnuts cost $242.08 to clean and repair, Apparently this little guy stuffed a bunch...


Latest Flora of the United States Reference Libraries

Virginia Pine, Pinus virginiana, pollen cones
2014-05-19 09:44:09

Virginia pine (Pinus virginiana) grows in southern New York from Long Island and continues through the Appalachian Mountains to western Tennessee and Alabamain elevations as high as 2953 feet. This tree is also known as the scrub pine, spruce pine, or Jersey pine. The Harvard Arboretum in Boston, MA has cultivated Virginia pine on display. The Virginia pine is a medium sized tree growing from 29.5 – 59 feet tall with some getting as tall as 105 feet in perfect conditions. This tree grows...

Ponderosa Pine, Pinus ponderosa
2014-05-16 11:05:52

Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) is native to western North America in sixteen states as well as southern British Columbia, Canada. This tree is also known as the bull pine, blackjack pine, or western pitch, red and yellow pine, as well as Yosemite pine. The Ponderosa pine grows at sea level up to 9843 feet above sea level and can live 300-600 years. This pine is one of the largest pine trees growing to heights of 235 feet and can achieve a trunk diameter of 324 inches. The bark of mature...

Pond Pine, Pinus serotina
2014-05-16 10:40:26

Pond Pine (Pinus serotina) grows in the United States along the Atlantic coast from southern New Jersey south to Florida then west to southern Alabama. This pine grows in wet ground near ponds, and swamps and is also known as the marsh pine or pocosin pine. The pond pine is a small tree growing to heights of 82 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.6 feet. The tree tends to grow crooked and has several tops at the crown. The bark is scaly and reddish brown in color. The needles grow in bundles...

Lodgepole Pine, Pinus contorta
2014-04-27 08:06:16

Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) is found in western North America in the upper mountains and subalpine regions of Colorado’s northern Rocky Mountains. This tree is considered to be invasive in New Zealand. This tree is also known as the shore pine, twisted pine, and contorta pine as well as black pine, scrub pine, and coast pine. The Lodgepole pine grows best between 8000 and 10,000 feet above sea level. They like to grow in well-drained, slightly acidic, sandy soils on gentle south...

Knobcone Pine Cone, Pinus attenuata
2014-04-27 07:44:40

Knobcone pine (Pinus attenuata) grows in the mountains of southern Oregon to Baja California. This tree is usually found in pure stands but can mix in with the Bishop pine and the Monterey pine along the Oregon-California coastline. This tree grows in shallow rocky infertile soil. The knobcone pine is a relatively short lived tree living 75-100 years. The Knobcone pine grows at sea level up to 5500 feet in elevation and is a short to medium tree growing to heights of 26-79 feet with a...

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Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.