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Latest Flora of the United States Stories

2008-01-15 13:10:00

Most of Colorado's lodgepole pine trees stand to be dead within the next 5 years.  In 1996, a bark beetle infestation was detected, and last year it spread over 500,000 acres more than previous years. Federal forestry officials say that this brings the total count of affected acres to 1.5 million. This infestation mainly affects five northern counties which straddle the Continental Divide, and has recently spread to part of southern Wyoming and the Front Range. Those effected counties...

2008-01-08 15:35:00

Following a five year study of switch grass done by the USDA's Agricultural Research Service along with the University of Nebraska, it has been determined that prairie grasses grown using only moderate amounts of fertilizer on poor land with typically low yield can produce a large amount of ethanol. Ken Vogel, a U.S. Department of Agriculture geneticist and a University of Nebraska-Lincoln professor as well as one of the researchers on the project, said that one acre of switch grass on farms...

2007-10-28 06:00:10

By Cole, Ian B Saxena, Praveen K; Murch, Susan J Abstract Plant-based medicines have an important role in the lives of millions of people. The ancient knowledge of the use of plants as medicines has led to the discovery of many important western pharmaceuticals, and the popularity of whole plant preparations for a range of therapeutic applications is growing rapidly. However, there are many challenges in the production of plant-based medicines, many of which put both the consumer and the...

2007-09-25 18:00:27

U.S. researchers travel to Canada next spring to study simulated global warming involving about 2,000 sugar maple tree seedlings. Northern Illinois University Professors Lesley Rigg and David Goldblum have been awarded a $260,000 National Science Foundation grant to simulate global warming on sugar maple seedlings now growing in Canada's Lake Superior Provincial Park. The researchers will build rain-exclusion, temperature-controlled structures over the seedlings to simulate temperature...

2007-09-15 06:00:55

By Richard Nunnally, Richmond Times-Dispatch, Va. Sep. 15--Q:I grow tomatoes every year and find those big green worms on them. Some have white lumps on their backs. I've heard they are some kind of eggs. Is that true? If so, are they harmful? Answer: The worms you're seeing are tomato hornworms. They are common and enjoy eating the leaves of tomato plants. The white lumps are the egg cases for a parasitic wasp. This wasp stings the worm and deposits its eggs on the worm's back. As the...

2007-08-23 09:04:09

SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) - A fungus scientists have dubbed "Black Fingers of Death" may turn out to be the first long-range weapon in efforts to halt the advance of cheatgrass, a destructive invasive weed, scientists say. Gonzaga University biology professors Julie Beckstead and David L. Boose were recently awarded $247,000 in federal grants for a three-year study on pyrenophora semeniperda, a tiny, naturally occurring soil fungus that attacks the seeds of cheatgrass. Working with colleagues at...

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2007-03-21 15:46:43

DES MOINES, Iowa -- A new species of North American bamboo was recently discovered by Iowa State University and University of North Carolina botanists, making it the third known native species of the hardy grass in the United States. The "hill cane" was discovered in the Appalachian Mountains. It's different from the other two native species of bamboo, which were discovered more than 200 years ago, because it drops its leaves in the fall. "We tend to think that we ... know our own...

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2007-03-10 18:20:00

NEW YORK -- America is drunk on ethanol. Farmers in the Midwest are sending billions of bushels of corn to refineries that turn it into billions of gallons of fuel. Automakers in Detroit have already built millions of cars, trucks and SUVs that can run on it, and are committed to making millions more. In Washington, politicians have approved generous subsidies for companies that make ethanol. And just this week, President Bush arranged with Brazil's President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva for...

2006-11-10 00:00:18

By SHANNON MONTGOMERY EDMONTON (CP) - Alberta wants forestry companies to step up the cutting of pine trees to help deal with a massive outbreak of destructive mountain pine beetles. Millions of the tiny insects have made their first major advance into Alberta's northern forest, settling in for the winter in up to 1.5 million trees - up from only 19,000 trees last year. The infestation has the government and industry scrambling to try and contain a scourge that has already ruined huge...

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2006-07-10 16:19:07

WASHINGTON -- Ethanol is far from a cure-all for the nation's energy problems. It's not as environmentally friendly as some supporters claim and would supply only 12 percent of U.S. motoring fuel - even if every acre of corn were used. A number of researchers, the latest in a report Monday, are warning about exaggerated expectations that ethanol could dramatically change America's dependence on foreign oil by shifting motorists away from gasoline. As far as alternative fuels are concerned,...


Latest Flora of the United States Reference Libraries

Virginia Pine, Pinus virginiana, pollen cones
2014-05-19 09:44:09

Virginia pine (Pinus virginiana) grows in southern New York from Long Island and continues through the Appalachian Mountains to western Tennessee and Alabamain elevations as high as 2953 feet. This tree is also known as the scrub pine, spruce pine, or Jersey pine. The Harvard Arboretum in Boston, MA has cultivated Virginia pine on display. The Virginia pine is a medium sized tree growing from 29.5 – 59 feet tall with some getting as tall as 105 feet in perfect conditions. This tree grows...

Ponderosa Pine, Pinus ponderosa
2014-05-16 11:05:52

Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) is native to western North America in sixteen states as well as southern British Columbia, Canada. This tree is also known as the bull pine, blackjack pine, or western pitch, red and yellow pine, as well as Yosemite pine. The Ponderosa pine grows at sea level up to 9843 feet above sea level and can live 300-600 years. This pine is one of the largest pine trees growing to heights of 235 feet and can achieve a trunk diameter of 324 inches. The bark of mature...

Pond Pine, Pinus serotina
2014-05-16 10:40:26

Pond Pine (Pinus serotina) grows in the United States along the Atlantic coast from southern New Jersey south to Florida then west to southern Alabama. This pine grows in wet ground near ponds, and swamps and is also known as the marsh pine or pocosin pine. The pond pine is a small tree growing to heights of 82 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.6 feet. The tree tends to grow crooked and has several tops at the crown. The bark is scaly and reddish brown in color. The needles grow in bundles...

Lodgepole Pine, Pinus contorta
2014-04-27 08:06:16

Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) is found in western North America in the upper mountains and subalpine regions of Colorado’s northern Rocky Mountains. This tree is considered to be invasive in New Zealand. This tree is also known as the shore pine, twisted pine, and contorta pine as well as black pine, scrub pine, and coast pine. The Lodgepole pine grows best between 8000 and 10,000 feet above sea level. They like to grow in well-drained, slightly acidic, sandy soils on gentle south...

Knobcone Pine Cone, Pinus attenuata
2014-04-27 07:44:40

Knobcone pine (Pinus attenuata) grows in the mountains of southern Oregon to Baja California. This tree is usually found in pure stands but can mix in with the Bishop pine and the Monterey pine along the Oregon-California coastline. This tree grows in shallow rocky infertile soil. The knobcone pine is a relatively short lived tree living 75-100 years. The Knobcone pine grows at sea level up to 5500 feet in elevation and is a short to medium tree growing to heights of 26-79 feet with a...

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Word of the Day
mundungus
  • A stinking tobacco.
  • Offal; waste animal product; organic matter unfit for consumption.
This word comes from the Spanish 'mondongo,' tripe, entrails.