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Latest Flower Stories

2011-12-21 11:41:39

Hay fever (runny nose, sneezing, itchy eyes) is caused by an allergy to pollen, and most commonly to grass pollen. These tiny grains bring misery to sufferers through spring and summer and pollen levels are often included as part of weather reports to help sufferers prepare. However new research published in BioMed Central's open access journal Clinical and Translational Allergy shows that, regardless of medication and other allergies, for the same grass pollen levels, hay fever symptoms are...

Genome Tree Of Life Is Largest Yet For Seed Plants
2011-12-17 04:26:21

New York Plant Genomics Consortium maps evolutionary relationships, gene functions for 150 species Scientists at the American Museum of Natural History, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, The New York Botanical Garden, and New York University have created the largest genome-based tree of life for seed plants to date. Their findings, published today in the journal PLoS Genetics, plot the evolutionary relationships of 150 different species of plants based on advanced genome-wide analysis of gene...

2011-12-01 19:06:40

Researchers have confirmed a unique behavior within the male population of tiny fig wasps that pollinate fig trees — they team up to help pregnant females, even if they have not mated themselves. Published online in the Royal Society journal Biology Letters, the study confirms that placid male pollinator fig wasps work together to chew an escape tunnel for their females, before crawling back into the fig to die - the non-pollinating variety are too busy fighting each other to help....

For Stronger Corn, Make It All Female
2011-12-01 05:00:02

A Purdue University researcher has taken corn off steroids and found that the results might lead to improvements in that and other crops. Burkhard Schulz, an assistant professor of horticulture and landscape architecture, wanted to understand the relationship between natural brassinosteroids - a natural plant steroid hormone - and plant architecture, specifically plant height. Schulz said corn could benefit by becoming shorter and sturdier, but the mechanisms that control those traits are...

2011-11-18 03:43:02

A new study of flower petals shows evolution in action, and contradicts more that 60 years of scientific thought. The findings are reported by a scientist from UC Santa Barbara and a research team from Harvard University in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B this week. Columbine flowers, known as Aquilegia, evolved several lengths of petal spurs that match the tongue lengths of their pollinators, including bees, hummingbirds, and hawkmoths. The petal spurs are shaped like a tubular...

Image 1 - Dramatic Diversity Of Columbine Flowers Explained By Simple Change In Cell Shape
2011-11-16 10:00:49

[ Watch the Video ] To match pollinators' probing tongues, cells in floral spurs elongate, driving rapid speciation Columbine flowers are recognizable by the long, trailing nectar spurs that extend from the bases of their petals, tempting the taste buds of their insect pollinators. New research at Harvard and the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) helps to explain how columbines have achieved a rapid radiation of approximately 70 species, with flowers apparently tailored...

2011-11-16 09:50:42

In an irony of nature, invasive species can become essential to the very ecosystems threatened by their presence, according to a recent discovery that could change how scientists and governments approach the restoration of natural spaces. Princeton University researchers report this month in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B evidence that destructive, non-native animals that have been deservedly maligned by conservationists the world over can take on important biological roles...

2011-11-11 14:16:18

Reproductive assurance in a self-compatible, annual, monocarpic herb, Centaurium erythraea In plants that rely on animals for pollination, the number of seeds they produce, or their relative fitness, is influenced by pollinator visits and the successful deposition of pollen. The number of visits a plant may receive depends partly on pollinator density as well as on conspecific plant density. But what if a plant happens to grow in a population that is small or has very few pollinators...

2011-11-05 01:18:44

Whether a species can evolve to survive climate change may depend on the biodiversity of its ecological community, according to a new mathematical model that simulates the effect of climate change on plants and pollinators. The findings, published in the early online edition of Evolutionary Applications, are important because some species that have survived large climatic change in the past might not be able to survive current and ongoing climate change. In the study, researchers used...

2011-10-26 13:07:32

Phylogeny constrains floral scent rewards in a specialized bee-pollinated group of oil-secreting orchids Bees, bats, and moths all follow their noses in search of food from flowers. Plants that rely on such animals for pollination often produce particular chemical scents that attract specific pollinators. However, the ability to produce certain chemicals is also determined by a plant's genetics, or phylogenetic history, which can potentially limit its ability to respond to pollinator...


Latest Flower Reference Libraries

31_3c7347f6f96c97d1f4a505a1453a8177
2005-07-13 08:42:04

Azaleas are flowering shrubs making up part of the genus Rhododendron. Azaleas were originally classed as a different genus of plant, but now they are recognized as two of the eight sub-genera of rhododendrons - subgenus Pentanthera typified by Rhododendron nudiflorum and subgenus Tsutsusi typified by Rhododendron tsutsusi. There are two types of azaleas: deciduous and evergreen. One of the major differences between azaleas and the rest of the rhododendron family is their size. Another is...

30_1f12cae0cfa114ac8945564df871c6d8
2005-06-08 20:47:33

Iris is a genus of flowering plants with showy flowers ranging in color from gold, copper-red or yellow to white, blue, blue-violet, lavender, tan, maroon and purple. Pink and apricot colored irises have also been bred in some species. The name "Iris" can be applied to the genus or to any of the species within it. It is also applied to various subdivisions within the genus. Description There are many species of iris widely distributed throughout the northern temperate zone. Their...

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Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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