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Latest Flower Stories

2013-03-05 14:06:21

New research has shown that certain Australian native flowers have shifted away from using insects as pollinators and evolved their flower color to the red hues favored by birds. In a study published in New Phytologist, biologists from Monash University and RMIT University have shown for the first time that Australian native flowers exclusively pollinated by birds have evolved color spectral signatures that are best discriminated by those birds. Dr Adrian Dyer of Monash and RMIT said...

Taxonomists Beware: The Flowers Might Just Be Fooling Us
2013-03-04 09:54:52

American Journal of Botany Floral morphologies may be less reliable than other traits in determining the relationships of papilionoid species and genera For hundreds of years, plant taxonomists have worked to understand how species are related. Until relatively recently, their only reliable source of information about these relationships was the plants' morphology–traits that could be observed, measured, counted, categorized, and described visually. And paramount among these...

The Pollination Game Is Greatly Affected By A Changing Climate
2013-03-01 12:34:02

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The relationships among species change over time as shifts in an ecosystem begin to affect the organisms living in them. Climate change has placed a new emphasis on studying these shifting relationships and a team of biologists from the Midwest sifted through historical scientific logs to find that the plant-pollinator relationships in their area have been significantly altered over the past 120 years. Working out of Washington...

Worldwide Crop Pollination Hurting Due To Loss Of Wild Bees
2013-03-01 09:30:07

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online An international study of wild insects finds that managed honeybees are not as successful at pollinating crops as wild insects, especially wild bees. Collected from 600 fields in 20 countries, the data suggest the continuing loss of wild insects in many agricultural landscapes is having negative consequences for crop harvests. The study, published in a recent issue of Science, is an urgent call to maintain and manage pollinator...

Electric Flowers Help Bees Pick Up Pollen
2013-02-22 11:25:13

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Previous research has shown that bees build up an electrical charge as they buzz through the air, but a new study from the University of Bristol in the U.K. has shown that the bees are able to use this charge to interact with nectar-bearing flowers. According to a summary of the study recently published in the journal Science, the British scientists showed that flowers actually modify their own electrical fields to attract the flying...

2013-02-01 23:04:01

Valentine´s Day is the day of the year when many people think of giving roses as a sign of love, beauty and romance, but the TickleMe Plant will change that. New York, NY (PRWEB) February 01, 2013 This Valentine´s Day - grow a TickleMe Plant that closes its leaves when tickled or blown a kiss. This sensitive plant will touch the hearts and bring a smile to the faces of those who tickle it. In fact, TickleMe Plants are the only real live plants that react to affection. The leaves...

2013-01-18 23:03:37

In The Event adds a floral cooler and new floral inventory, expanding local partnerships and diversifying designs. Salt Lake City, UT (PRWEB) January 18, 2013 In the Event, a Salt Lake City based full service event production and design house, has increased their floral inventory. They have added a new floral cooler to their warehouse, increasing their capacity for fresh flowers for events, catered affairs and businesses.  New vases and supplemental floral supplies have also been added...

Giant Tobacco Plants That Stay "Forever Young"
2013-01-10 13:56:28

Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft Tobacco plants bloom when they are just a few months old — and then they die. Now, researchers have located a genetic switch which can keep the plants young for years and which permits unbounded growth. In short, an ideal source of biomass. The life of tobacco plants is short. They grow for around three to four months, followed by flowering and then die. Their size is also limited, with plants only growing to about one-and-a-half to two meters tall. Now,...

Bumblebees Prefer More Floral Diversity, Less Pavement
2012-12-25 05:35:14

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Lower numbers of ground-nesting bumblebees, which are important native pollinators, are found in landscapes with larger amounts of paved roads and impervious construction, reveals a new study from The University of Texas at Austin and the University of California, Berkeley. According to the study, nesting opportunities for wild bees could be improved through reducing the local use of pavement and increasing natural habitat within the...


Latest Flower Reference Libraries

31_3c7347f6f96c97d1f4a505a1453a8177
2005-07-13 08:42:04

Azaleas are flowering shrubs making up part of the genus Rhododendron. Azaleas were originally classed as a different genus of plant, but now they are recognized as two of the eight sub-genera of rhododendrons - subgenus Pentanthera typified by Rhododendron nudiflorum and subgenus Tsutsusi typified by Rhododendron tsutsusi. There are two types of azaleas: deciduous and evergreen. One of the major differences between azaleas and the rest of the rhododendron family is their size. Another is...

30_1f12cae0cfa114ac8945564df871c6d8
2005-06-08 20:47:33

Iris is a genus of flowering plants with showy flowers ranging in color from gold, copper-red or yellow to white, blue, blue-violet, lavender, tan, maroon and purple. Pink and apricot colored irises have also been bred in some species. The name "Iris" can be applied to the genus or to any of the species within it. It is also applied to various subdivisions within the genus. Description There are many species of iris widely distributed throughout the northern temperate zone. Their...

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Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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