Quantcast

Latest Fluorescence Stories

2012-03-26 09:20:17

Discovery could lead to new methods for environmental remediation and speeding up chemical reactions A glow coming from the glassy shell of microscopic marine algae called diatoms could someday help us detect chemicals and other substances in water samples. And the fact that this diatom can glow in response to an external substance could also help researchers develop a variety of new, diatom-inspired nanomaterials that could solve problems in sensing, catalysis and environmental...

Image 1 - Proteins Shine Light On Cellular Processes
2012-03-22 04:12:05

A new design triples efficiency of cyan fluorescent proteins Scientists have designed a molecule which, in living cells, emits turquoise light three times brighter than possible until recently. This improves the sensitivity of cellular imaging, a technique where biological processes inside a living organism are imaged at high resolution. The results have been published in Nature Communications on 20 March 2012. The lead author of the publication is Antoine Royant from the Institut de...

Researchers Increase Speed Of Single-molecule Measurements
2012-03-19 04:22:15

New integrated circuit design could lead to cheaper, faster DNA sequencing As nanotechnology becomes ever more ubiquitous, researchers are using it to make medical diagnostics smaller, faster, and cheaper, in order to better diagnose diseases, learn more about inherited traits, and more. But as sensors get smaller, measuring them becomes more difficult–there is always a tradeoff between how long any measurement takes to make and how precise it is. And when a signal is very weak, the...

2012-02-09 00:05:03

Individual cells modified to act as sensors using fluorescence are already useful tools in biochemistry, but now they can add good timing to their resumé, thanks in part to expertise from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). With the added capability to track the timing of dynamic biochemical reactions, cell sensors become more useful for many studies, such as measurements of protein folding or neural activity. As described in the Journal of the...

2012-02-06 11:15:21

North Carolina State University researchers have created specially engineered mammalian cells to provide a new "chemical handle" which will enable researchers to label proteins of interest more efficiently, without disrupting the normal function of the proteins themselves or the cells in which they are found. Protein labeling is used by researchers in a variety of fields to help them understand how these important molecules affect the normal functioning of cells. Currently, proteins are...

2012-01-31 16:34:25

Rice University researchers show how length, imperfections affect carbon nanotube fluorescence A painstaking study by Rice University has brought a wealth of new information about single-walled carbon nanotubes through analysis of their fluorescence. The current issue of the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano features an article about work by the Rice lab of chemist Bruce Weisman to understand how the lengths and imperfections of individual nanotubes affect their fluorescence...

2012-01-02 14:30:00

The handheld Dino-Lite AM4113T-GFBW is a critical benefit to geneticists and bio-engineering researchers. Roanoke, Virginia (PRWEB) January 02, 2012 Microscope.com, in partnership with BigC.com, is pleased to introduce the Dino-Lite AM4113T-GFBW to the world of microscopy. With blue LEDs for excitation and a 510nm emission filter, this new microscope can observe green fluorescence protein (GFP) activity in live cells, a critical benefit to the geneticist or bio-engineering researcher. In...


Word of the Day
negawatt
  • A unit of saved energy.
Coined by Amory Lovins, chairman of the Rocky Mountain Institute as a contraction of negative watt on the model of similar compounds like megawatt.