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Latest Flying and gliding animals Stories

2014-03-04 12:24:07

A team of researchers exploring the aerodynamics of flying snakes finds that whirls of wind, the little vortices surrounding it, give them an extra lift. WASHINGTON, March 4, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Animal flight behavior is an exciting frontier for engineers to both apply knowledge of aerodynamics and to learn from nature's solutions to operating in the air. Flying snakes are particularly intriguing to researchers because they lack wings or any other features that remotely...

2011-07-28 12:50:53

Gripping tightly to a tree trunk, at first sight a colugo might be mistaken for a lemur. However, when this animal leaps it launches into a graceful glide, spreading wide the enormous membrane that spans its legs and tail to cover distances of up to 150m. So, when Greg Byrnes and his colleague Andrew Spence from the University of California, Berkeley, USA, were looking around for a mammal to carry the accelerometer/radio transmitter backpacks that the duo designed to track animals in the...

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2011-07-07 10:59:56

Pterosaurs, flying reptiles from the time of the dinosaurs, were not driven to extinction by the birds, but in fact they continued to diversify and innovate for millions of years afterwards. A new study by Katy Prentice, done as part of her undergraduate degree (MSci in Palaeontology and Evolution) at the University of Bristol, shows that the pterosaurs evolved in a most unusual way, becoming more and more specialized through their 160 million years on Earth. The work is published July 6 in...

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2010-09-10 08:33:53

We're all familiar with birds that are as comfortable diving as they are flying but only one family of fish has made the reverse journey. Flying fish can remain airborne for over 40s, covering distances of up to 400m at speeds of 70km/h. Haecheon Choi, a mechanical engineer from Seoul National University, Korea, became fascinated by flying fish when reading a science book to his children. Realising that flying fish really do fly, he and his colleague, Hyungmin Park, decided to find out how...

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2010-01-25 14:25:00

The scientists argue that flight originated above, in the trees; such animals would have been gliders A joint team from the University of Kansas and Northeastern University in China says that it has settled the long-standing question of how bird flight began. In the Jan. 25 issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the KU-China researchers push their research into the origins of bird flight and the early evolution of birds with decisive flight tests of a model of the...

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2009-10-14 12:50:00

An international group of scientists have uncovered a new type of flying reptile, they reported on Tuesday. Writing in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, researchers from the University of Leicester, and the Geological Institute, Beijing documented evidence of a new type of pterosaur. Scientists said that the discovery fills in the large evolutionary gap between two different groups of pterosaurs: primitive long-tailed forms and their descendants, advanced...

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2009-09-18 07:10:00

Modeling the aerodynamic secrets of one of Nature's most efficient flyers Researchers are one step closer to creating a micro-aircraft that flies with the maneuverability and energy efficiency of an insect after decoding the aerodynamic secrets of insect flight. Dr John Young, from the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Australia, and a team of animal flight researchers from Oxford University's Department of Zoology, used high-speed digital video cameras to film locusts in action in a...

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2009-07-17 11:45:00

Scientists have discovered that a tiny lizard drifts slowly to the ground like a feather when it falls.  Looking from the outside, the neon blue tailed tree lizards (Holaspis guentheri) seem adapted to flying, gliding or moving through the air as they go from branch to branch in the trees of the African forest. There have even been stories about the African tree lizard gliding through the air. However, lacking the apparent adaptations necessary to upgrade their moves from a leap to a...

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2009-06-02 13:56:41

Turbulence hampers flight for various bee species, and possibly other insects New research shows some bees brace themselves against wind and turbulence by extending their sturdy hind legs while flying. But this approach comes at a steep cost, increasing aerodynamic drag and the power required for flight by roughly 30 percent, and cutting into the bees' flight performance. The findings are detailed in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "Wind is a universal part of life for...

2009-01-07 09:38:29

Dinosaur-era pterosaurs, often referred to as pterodactyls, used their arms as well as their legs to leap into flight, a computerized model suggests. In fact, pterosaurs -- believed to have died off 65 million years ago in the same cataclysm that killed off the dinosaurs on land and plesiosaurs at sea -- had much stronger arms than legs, which is the opposite of the way birds are built, Michael Habib, a researcher at the Johns Hopkins University medical school's Center for Functional Anatomy...


Latest Flying and gliding animals Reference Libraries

Microraptor
2012-03-21 23:43:50

Microraptor, meaning “small thief,” is a genus of dromaeosaurid dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous Period (120 million years ago). This small, four-winged animal was first discovered in the Jiufotang Formation in Liaoning, China, with more than two dozen specimens unearthed. There are two known species of Microraptor. The type species, M. zhaoianus, has been hotly debated for years. It was initially placed in the genus Archaeoraptor before a more accurate description placed it in the...

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2006-12-12 13:43:59

The Feathertail Glider (Acrobates pygmaeus), also known as the Pygmy Gliding Possum, is the world's smallest gliding mammal. It is named for its long feather-shaped tail. Although only the size of a very small mouse 2.56 to 3.15 in and .35 to .49 oz (65 to 80 mm and 10 to 14 g), it can leap and glide long distances from tree to tree. It can glide up to 27 yards (25 meters). Like other gliding mammals, the Feathertail Glider has a skin membrane between the fore and hind legs. It is thicker...

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2006-12-12 13:36:41

The Sugar Glider (Petaurus breviceps), sometimes called the Flying Sugar, is a small gliding possum. It is native to eastern and northern mainland Australia, New Guinea, and the Bismarck Archipelago, and introduced to Tasmania. Physical description The Sugar Glider is around 6.3 to 7.5 in (16 to 20 cm) long, with a tail almost as long as the body. It weighs between 3 and 5.3 oz (90 to 150 g). The fur is generally pearl grey, with black and cream patches at the base of the black or grey...

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