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Latest Flyswatter Stories

1ee77bdc185650b735f6cb44d630fed21
2008-08-29 07:45:00

Ever feel the frustration of failing to swat a fly? Well, researchers say they've solved the mystery. A U.S.-based study found the fly's ability to stay alive is due to its fast acting brain and an uncanny ability to plan ahead. The research noted that at the faintest hint of a threat, the insects adjust their preflight stance to flee in the opposite direction, ensuring a clean getaway. The study said this explains why flies so easily evade swipes from their human foes. "These movements are...


Latest Flyswatter Reference Libraries

0_de10eb2e42fd06c4215a84694b608cb9
2010-11-15 17:25:25

A flyswatter, usually consisting of a small rectangular sheet of flexible material, is a handheld device for smashing flies and other insects. The material is vented, thus reducing wind drag making it move faster in order to hit the target. The beginning flyswatters were just a striking surface attached to the end of a long stick. Dr. Samuel Crumbine was trying to raise awareness of the fly problem in Kansas in 1905 when he coined the term "swat the fly". Frank H. Rose created the "fly...

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Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
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