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Latest food intake Stories

Neuroscience Study Reveals New Player In Obesity
2014-01-08 08:24:33

Tufts University, Health Sciences Campus A protein directs appetite suppressor in the brain; implications for obesity treatment A new neuroscience study sheds light on the biological underpinnings of obesity. The in vivo study, published in the January 8 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience, reveals how a protein in the brain helps regulate food intake and body weight. The findings reveal a potential new avenue for the treatment of obesity and may help explain why medications that are...

2013-10-30 10:35:36

Despite their efforts, many morbidly obese people continue to consume too much food (hyperphagia) compared to their reserves and their needs. And yet, the hunger hormone, called ghrelin, is most frequently found at a normal or even lower level in these patients. The Inserm Unit 1073 team “Nutrition, inflammation and dysfunction of the gut-brain axis” (Inserm/University of Rouen) has just explained this mechanism causing this paradoxical hyperphagia. Certain antibodies have a greater...

2013-01-24 12:51:52

Smaller bites reduce food intake even during distracted eating Eating while distracted generally makes people eat more without being aware of it, but reducing bite sizes may be able to counter this effect, according to new research published January 23 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Dieuwerke Bolhuis and colleagues from Wageningen University, Netherlands. Previous studies have shown that taking smaller bites helps people eat less. Other research has also shown that people tend...

2012-09-18 23:11:20

The absence of a specific type of neuron in the brain can lead to obesity and diabetes in mice report researchers in The EMBO Journal. The outcome, however, depends on the type of diet that the animals are fed. A lack of AgRP-neurons, brain cells known to be involved in the control of food intake, leads to obesity if mice are fed a regular carbohydrate diet. However, animals that are deficient in AgRP-neurons but which are raised on a high-fat diet are leaner and healthier. The differences...

2012-07-05 22:41:57

Feeling full involves more than just the uncomfortable sensation that your waistband is getting tight. Investigators reporting online on July 5th in the Cell Press journal Cell have now mapped out the signals that travel between your gut and your brain to generate the feeling of satiety after eating a protein-rich meal. Understanding this back and forth loop between the brain and gut may pave the way for future approaches in the treatment and/or prevention of obesity. Food intake can be...

2011-07-12 12:39:47

New animal research demonstrates mechanisms that are involved in suppressing food intake and preventing obesity with exercise Research to be presented at the upcoming annual meeting of the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior (SSIB), the foremost society for research into all aspects of eating and drinking behavior, finds that alterations of meal-related gut hormone signals may contribute to the overall effects of exercise to help manage body weight. Regular exercise is important in...


Word of the Day
penuche
  • A fudgelike confection of brown sugar, cream or milk, and chopped nuts.
'Penuche' is a variant of 'panocha,' a coarse grade of sugar made in Mexico. 'Panocha' probably comes from the Spanish 'panoja, panocha,' ear of grain.
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