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Latest Food irradiation Stories

2008-08-22 18:00:10

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it will allow the sale of fresh spinach and iceberg lettuce treated with radiation to kill bacteria. The New York Times said it is the first time the U.S. government has allowed produce to be irradiated at levels high enough to kill E. coli and salmonella. Critics have expressed concern that irradiation could lower nutritional value and create unsafe chemicals. Dr. Laura Tarantino, director of the Office of Food Additive Safety at the FDA, told...

2008-08-22 12:00:38

To: NATIONAL EDITORS Contact: Brian Kennedy of Grocery Manufacturers Association, +1- 202-639-5994 Technology approved for control of food-borne pathogens in fresh iceberg lettuce and spinach WASHINGTON, Aug. 22 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Robert Brackett, chief science officer for the Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA), today released the following statement in response to the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) decision to allow ionizing radiation to be used for controlling...

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2008-08-22 10:10:00

Radiation may be the cure to consumer worries about E. coli and germs on fresh spinach and iceberg lettuce. On Friday, the Food and Drug Administration will issue new regulations allowing spinach and lettuce sellers to take that extra step. It's a long-awaited move amid increasing outbreaks from raw produce. Radiation does not excuse dirty produce, warned Dr. Laura Tarantino, FDA's chief of food additive safety. Farms and processors must continue to abide by standard rules to keep the...

2008-08-22 09:00:10

By Lauren Neergaard Associated Press WASHINGTON -- Consumers worried about salad safety may soon be able to buy fresh spinach and iceberg lettuce zapped with just enough radiation to kill E. coli and a few other germs. The Food and Drug Administration today will issue a regulation allowing spinach and lettuce sellers to take that extra step, a long- awaited move amid increasing outbreaks from raw produce. It doesn't excuse dirty produce, warned Dr. Laura Tarantino, FDA's chief of food...

2008-08-22 06:00:28

By Julie Schmit The Food and Drug Administration has approved use of irradiation on spinach and lettuce to kill dangerous bacteria, but companies may have a tough time selling the idea to consumers. The FDA's decision, effective today, adds iceberg lettuce and spinach to the short but growing list of foods approved for irradiation, including meat, poultry and some shellfish. While a handful of companies have succeeded in selling irradiated ground beef since it hit the market in...

2008-07-29 09:00:54

By LAURAN NEERGAARD By Lauran Neergaard The Associated Press WASHINGTON Could food producers literally squeeze the salmonella out of a jalapeno? Or zap the E. coli from lettuce without it going limp? Headline-grabbing food poisonings from raw foods are prompting new interest in technology - from super-high pressure to irradiation - to get rid of some of the bugs. It won't be a panacea: Far better to prevent contamination on the farm than to try to get rid of it later. "This is...

2008-07-29 09:00:00

WASHINGTON -- Could food producers literally squeeze the salmonella out of a jalapeno? Or zap the E. coli from lettuce without it going limp? Headline-grabbing food poisonings from raw foods are prompting new interest in technology -- from super-high pressure to irradiation -- to get rid of some of the bugs. It won't be a panacea: Far better to prevent contamination on the farm than to try to get rid of it later. "This is never an excuse for a dirty product," warns University of Minnesota...

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2008-07-29 00:40:00

Attention grabbing food poisonings in recent days have sparked new interest in using technology to rid raw produce of unwanted bacteria. Experts say it's easier to prevent contamination on the farm than to try to get rid of it later. "This is never an excuse for a dirty product," warns University of Minnesota infectious disease specialist Michael Osterholm. Farmers allege it's impossible to prevent all contamination in open fields. Popular ready-to-eat foods including pre-washed and bagged...

2008-06-27 09:02:50

New U.S. invention kills food-borne pathogens in minutes WASHINGTON, June 25 (Xinhua) -- Researchers from University of Georgia have developed a new technology that can rapidly reduce contamination of dangerous bacteria on food, the university announced Wednesday. The new antimicrobial wash uses a combination of ingredients that kills bacteria within one to five minutes from application. It can be used as a spray and immersion solution and can rapidly kill Salmonella and E. coli on...

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2008-04-10 09:40:00

Washing fresh fruits and vegetables before eating may reduce the risk of food poisoning and those awful episodes of vomiting and diarrhea. But according to new research, described today at the 235th national meeting of the American Chemical Society, washing alone "” even with chlorine disinfectants "” may not be enough. Studies show that certain disease-causing microbes are masters at playing hide-and-go seek with such chemical sanitizers. These bacteria can make their way inside...


Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
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