Quantcast

Latest food web Stories

Image 1 - Land Animals Suffered Catastrophic Losses After Permian Period
2011-10-26 06:31:51

The cataclysmic events that marked the end of the Permian Period some 252 million years ago were a watershed moment in the history of life on Earth. As much as 90 percent of ocean organisms were extinguished, ushering in a new order of marine species, some of which we still see today. But while land dwellers certainly sustained major losses, the extent of extinction and the reshuffling afterward were less clear. In a paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B,...

ccb30b6d8f51fd9f11e5d2aeaf422803
2011-05-13 03:11:59

Scientists have known for two decades that sulfur compounds that are produced by bacterioplankton as they consume decaying algae in the ocean cycle through two paths. In one, a sulfur compound dimethylsulfide, or DMS, goes into the atmosphere, where it leads to water droplet formation "“ the basis of clouds that cool the Earth. In the other, a sulfur compound goes into the ocean's food web, where it is eaten and returned to seawater. What they haven't known is how sulfur is routed one...

4ae335c2a92fea6dd84722c3d7e2e0f11
2011-03-05 10:41:50

Sea-ice algae "“ the important first rung of the food web each spring in places like the Arctic Ocean "“ can engineer ice to its advantage, according to the first published findings about this ability.The same gel-like mucus secreted by sea-ice algae as a kind of antifreeze against temperatures well below minus 10 C is also allowing algae to sculpt microscopic channels and pores in ice that are hospitable to itself and other microorganisms.Altering ice to their benefit should help...

2010-11-17 21:46:57

The most widely adopted measure for assessing the state of the world's oceans and fisheries led to inaccurate conclusions in nearly half the ecosystems where it was applied according to new analysis by an international team led by a University of Washington fisheries scientist. "Applied to individual ecosystems it's like flipping a coin, half the time you get the right answer and half the time you get the wrong answer," said Trevor Branch, a UW assistant professor of aquatic and fishery...

5b30e3d53ee50f91bc703fbbbefa85d11
2010-11-08 12:15:00

Scientists have tracked how certain nontoxic elements of oil from the BP spill quickly entered the food web in the Gulf of Mexico. The new study suggests the 172 million-gallons of oil spilled into the Gulf in April have become food for plankton. "Everybody is making a huge deal of where did the oil go," chief study author William "Monty" Graham, a plankton expert at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab in Alabama, told the Associated Press (AP). "It just became food." The study didn't specifically...

2010-06-25 16:17:47

People who fish for a living pursue top profits, not necessarily top predators, according to the first-ever analysis of worldwide catch and economic data for the past 55 years. This differs from the observation raised 10 years ago that humans were "fishing down" the food web. It was assumed that catches of the predators at the top of the food chain, such as halibut and tuna, were declining after fishers started landing more fish from lower on the food chain, such as herring and anchovies. The...

2010-05-18 08:22:30

Study suggests pollution reductions could help restoration efforts A new study to be published in the academic journal Reviews in Fisheries Science recommends that efforts to restore the endangered California delta smelt and other declining pelagic fish should more sharply focus on reducing nutrient pollution to the species' native waters. The research indicates these fish populations would greatly benefit from reductions in the amount of nitrogen flowing into the Sacramento-San Joaquin...


Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.