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Last updated on April 18, 2014 at 13:22 EDT

Latest Forage Stories

2013-01-25 16:20:54

HALSEY, Ore., Jan. 25, 2013 /PRNewswire-iReach/ -- With spring right around the corner, thoughts of planting should be on everyone's mind. The always present question is what to plant? Do you leave everything the same? If there was a lack of forage for your animals to graze on last fall, chances are you should renovate your pasture. You may be scratching your head what to do with your thinned alfalfa stand: establish a new field or stretch one more year with low yield? You may find yourself...

Bumblebees Prefer More Floral Diversity, Less Pavement
2012-12-25 05:35:14

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Lower numbers of ground-nesting bumblebees, which are important native pollinators, are found in landscapes with larger amounts of paved roads and impervious construction, reveals a new study from The University of Texas at Austin and the University of California, Berkeley. According to the study, nesting opportunities for wild bees could be improved through reducing the local use of pavement and increasing natural habitat within the...

Selenium Impacts Honey Bee Behavior And Survival
2012-04-26 06:48:50

UC Riverside entomologists develop 'proof of concept' that selenium may negatively impact honey bee populations at selenium-polluted sites Entomologists at the University of California, Riverside have a "proof of concept" that selenium, a nonmetal chemical element, can disrupt the foraging behavior and survival of honey bees. Selenium in very low concentrations is necessary for the normal development of insects – and humans – but becomes toxic at only slightly higher...

2012-03-12 19:49:51

A new study out of Wellesley College sheds light on the link between genetic diversity and healthier bee colonies–by revealing the makeup of the microscopic life found inside the guts, on the bodies, and in the food of these insects. For the first time, scientists discovered that genetically diverse populations of worker bees, a result of the highly promiscuous mating behavior of queens, benefited from diverse symbiotic microbial communities, reduced loads of bacteria from pathogenic...

Bees Seek Adventure, Studies Show
2012-03-11 05:38:49

Humans aren´t the only species on Planet Earth to seek thrills and adventure. A new study posted in the journal Science explains that honey bees are just as likely as human beings to seek an adrenaline high. Molecular pathways in the brain that are often associated with thrill-seeking were found in honey bees as well. Often thought to be diligent in roles given to them by the hive, this new study shows that honey bees may have wants and desires other than serving the queen of the...

2012-02-14 14:07:56

Humans move between ℠patches´ in their memory using the same strategy as bees flitting between flowers for pollen or birds searching among bushes for berries. Researchers at the University of Warwick and Indiana University have identified parallels between animals looking for food in the wild and humans searching for items within their memory — suggesting that people with the best ℠memory foraging´ strategies are better at recalling items. Scientists asked...

Honeybee Deaths Linked To Seed Insecticide Exposure
2012-01-13 04:31:14

Honeybee populations have been in serious decline for years, and Purdue University scientists may have identified one of the factors that cause bee deaths around agricultural fields. Analyses of bees found dead in and around hives from several apiaries over two years in Indiana showed the presence of neonicotinoid insecticides, which are commonly used to coat corn and soybean seeds before planting. The research showed that those insecticides were present at high concentrations in waste...

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2011-05-19 08:04:49

Bees can find their way home from an amazing 11 kilometers away over several days' travel, thanks to their ability to remember landmarks and read information from the sky, a new study shows. Vision scientists have found more reasons for the honeybee's incredible knack of navigating cross-country"“ these creatures often rely on the position of the sun, the polarization of light in the sky, the panorama view of the horizon and landmarks including towers, mountains or lakes. Led by...

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2011-02-13 08:57:40

The application of a naturally occurring pheromone to honey bee test colonies increases colony growth resulting in stronger hives overall, according to a new study conducted by scientists at Oregon State University and Texas A&M University. The study, which appeared this week in the journal, PLoS ONE, comes amid national concern over the existence of honey bee Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) "“ a combination of events that result in the death of a bee colony. The causes behind CCD...

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2010-10-17 10:45:00

University of North Carolina, Greensboro researchers are studying native grasses to develop a better understanding of the workings of fungal endophytesLegend has it that five railroad surveyors killed by Indians in 1854 in New Mexico lost their lives because they unwittingly allowed their horses to graze on "sleepy grass" the night before. The next morning, under attack, the surveyors jumped on their horses to escape--but the animals were frozen in place. Without the means for a quick...


Latest Forage Reference Libraries

Honeybee
2005-09-08 09:11:58

The honeybee is a colonial insect that is often maintained, fed, and transported by farmers. Honeybees are a subset of bees which fall into the Order Hymenoptera and Suborder Apocrita. Of the approximately 20,000 known species of bees, four are considered honeybees: Apis florea, Apis dorsata, Apis cerana, and Apis mellifera (Western honeybee). It is thought that they have been domesticated at least since the time of the building of the Egyptian pyramids. Honeybees store honey (which is...

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