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Latest Foraminifera Stories

Fossil And Molecular Evidence Important For Studying Evolution
2013-08-10 05:19:24

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The fossils of microscopic aquatic creatures, whose shells resemble grains of sand to the naked eye, could help shed new light on the process of evolution, according to new research published Friday in the journal Methods in Ecology & Evolution. As part of their research, University of Southampton evolutionary ecologist Dr. Thomas Ezard and his colleagues are analyzing the remains of the one-millimeter large planktonic...

Ancient Stromatolites May Have Been Edged Out By Foraminifera
2013-05-29 05:47:20

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Stromatolites, “layered rocks” made of calcium carbonate, were the earliest visible manifestation of life on Earth. A team of researchers, including scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI); Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); the University of Connecticut; Harvard Medical School; and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, suggest that the disappearance of stromatolites may have been driven by...

2013-02-07 15:02:51

Researchers from the University of Bonn found out that tiny foraminifera in the oceans can save islands The climate is getting warmer, and sea levels are rising — a threat to island nations. As a group of researchers lead by colleagues from the University of Bonn found out, at the same time, tiny single-cell organisms are spreading rapidly through the world's oceans, where they might be able to mitigate the consequences of climate change. Foraminifera of the variety Amphistegina are...

Giant Amoebas Found Deep in Mariana Trench
2011-10-23 05:33:05

During a summer expedition to the deepest region on the planet, the Mariana Trench, a team of researchers and engineers witnessed a breed of giant amoebas known as xenophyophores living at depths that had never been recorded before, various media outlets reported over the weekend. The team, which consisted of scientists representing the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and National Geographic engineers, used untethered landers known as dropcams, lights, and digital video...

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2010-09-16 11:42:26

By Robert Sanders, University of California, Berkeley Millimeter-size marine organisms called foraminifera have been used to monitor pollutants in marshes and oceans, and could help to assess recovery in the Gulf of Mexico following the three-month long Deepwater Horizon oil spill. That was the message from a French/American team of researchers who recently reported on the health of French marshes and mudflats 32 years after the Amoco Cadiz spilled 220,000 tons of oil along the Brittany coast...

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2010-02-12 09:27:15

Evidence from the Challenger Deep "“ the deepest surveyed point in the world's oceans "“ suggests that tiny single-celled creatures called foraminifera living at extreme depths of more than ten kilometers build their homes using material that sinks down from near the ocean surface. The Challenger Deep is located in the Mariana Trench in the western Pacific Ocean. It lies in the hadal zone beyond the abyssal zone, and plunges down to a water depth of around 11 kilometers. "The...

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2009-07-14 10:50:00

Drifting across the world's oceans are a group of unicellular marine microorganisms that are not only a crucial source of food for other marine life "” but their fossils, which are found in abundance, provide scientists with an extraordinary record of climatic change and other major events in the history of the earth. Now, planktonic foraminifera "” single-celled shell building members of the marine microplankton community "” have given up a secret of their very own.A team...

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2009-03-09 09:55:00

A new study found that ocean acidification caused by climate change is stripping away the protective shell of tiny yet vital organisms that absorb huge amounts of carbon pollution from the atmosphere, the AFP reported. The study found that the calcium carapace of microscopic animals called foraminifera living in the Southern Ocean have fallen in weight by a third since the start of the Industrial Revolution. The tiny organisms inhabit the surface waters of oceans around the world and are an...

2005-10-31 13:00:38

In 2004 and now in 2005, the hurricane seasons have been horrifyingly intense "“ so how bad is the long-range forecast? Based on a century of data, meteorologists currently believe that a 30-year lull in hurricane activity is over and we are at the beginning of a new multi-decade period of larger and more frequent storms. However, there is other data that suggests we may also be coming to the end of a thousand year period of greatly diminished hurricane activity, making the outlook even...

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2005-02-03 13:53:58

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Tiny single-celled organisms, many of them previously unknown, have been discovered beneath nearly seven miles of water in the deepest part of the ocean. A sample of sediment collected from the Challenger Deep southwest of Guam in the Pacific Ocean Islands yielded several hundred foraminifera, a type of plankton that is usually abundant near the ocean surface. "On the species level, all the species we found from the Challenger Deep are quite new," researcher Hiroshi...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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